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November 22, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-22

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Badgers Meet Gophers
_ In Top Big Ten Action

By DICK LEWIS
When Michigan rooters huddle
in the Buckeye Stadium stands to-
day, they'll have their fingers
crossed, their prayers said, and
their heads facing West where
Wisconsin encounters upset-mind-
ed Minnesota at Madison.
And the Gophers will have more
than talented Paul Giel on their
side. Its been 40 years sonce the
Badgers have annexed a Big Ten
title, and the Wisconsin eleven
has never made a trip to the Rose
Bowl classic.
NEVERTHELESS, Wisconsin is
rated a solid two-touchdown fav-
orite to quell the Ski-U-Mah
threat and gain at least a share
of the 1952 conference crown.
With fullback Alan (The
Horse) Ameche and quarterback
Jim Haluska in the lineup, Coach
Ivy Williamson's charges are a
good bet to capture the 20th in
a 61 game series.
Ameche is the Western Confer-
ence rushing leader with 596 yards
in 121 carries for a 4.93. Haluska
ranks fouith in passing, hitting on
62 of 101 tosses for 734 yards, six
touchdowns and a .714 percentage.
* * *
GOPHER HOPES rest with Giel,
who does everything but put the
ball in play. He has hit confer-
ence lines for -344 yards in 96 at-

temupts and has racked up 186'
yards on 19 of 46 pass completions.
Giel, who accounted for 238
of Minnesota's 293 yards gained
against Nebraska last Saturday,
is the league's second-best punt-
er with a 39.6 average.
The Old Oaken Bucket and a
mathematical chance for the Big
Ten title will be up for the grabs
when down-trodden Iowa goes
against injury-ridden Purdue in
the Boilermaker lair.
* * *
PURDUE WILL be shooting for
its fifth successive Bucket victory,
while the Hoosiers take aim on
their second league win.
Mainstays of the Indiana at-
tack are Gene Gedman, all-con-
ference fullback candidate who
leads the Big scorers for all
games, and diminutive Lou
D'Achille, a left-handed passerj
who has found 51 of 101 re-
ceivers on the season.
The Boilermakers counter with
the practically unstoppable duo of
quarterback Dale Samuels and end
Bernard Flowers.
* * *
SAMUELS HEADS the pack of
loop chuckers with 62 completions
in 102 tosses for 721 yards, seven
touchdowns and 61 per cent ac-
curacy.
Flowers has nabbed 24 passes

four of them for six-pointers, for
four touchdowns.
Coach Stu Holcombe's offense
also boasts fullback Max Schmal-
ing who has netted six touch-
downs in five conference outings.
MIRED DEEP in the second di-
vision, Illinois and Northwestern
engage in a meaningless contest
at Champaign. A Wildcat win
would deadlock the two squads for
a possible spot in the basement.
Up at East Lansing, Michigan
State is rated an easy choice to
dump Marquette and chalk up
its second consecutive unblem-
ished season.
Victory for the Spartans would
run its victory skein to 24 straight,
the longest unmarred string in
football today.
Notre Dame clashes with
Iowa's Hawkeyes at Iowa City in
other mid-west action. The two
have tied for the last two years.
On the West Coast, the game
of games is on tap for a nation-
wide television audience. More
than 100,000 fans will jam Los
Angeles' Memorial Coliseum to
watch Southern California and
UCLA, both undefeated, fight it
out for the Rose Bowl.

TUG HOLDS TALE:
Wilson To Announce
Bowl Choice Monday
By ED WHIPPLE IN ACCORDANCE with custom,
Daily Sports Editor Wilson said, details of the vote will
The Big Ten's selection of its not be announced.
Rose Bowl representative will be There are a whole host of
officially announced at noon Mon- "IF'S" that could become real-
day (Central Standard Time), ac- ity this afternoon.
cording to K. L. Wilson, Confer- If Michigan beats Ohio State
ence Commissioner, regardless of and Wisconsin beats Minnesota,
what teams win today. the Wolverines and Badgers tie for4
By Monday, Wilson said yester- the championship;
day, a complete ballot will have If Wisconsin wins and Michigan
peen received from the conference loses, Wisconsin 'is undisputed
Athletic Directors who are dele- champ;
gated to select "the most repre- If Michigan wins and Wisconsin
sentative team" from the Confer- loses, Michigan is undisputed
ence for Bowl participation. champion;
* *k',

TOM WITHERSPOON
. . . offensive halfback

I

CLASSIFIEDS

LOST AND FOUND

T H I S EXCLUDES Illinois.
wuhich participated last year, andI
Michigan State, which by terms
of the inter-Conference agree-
ment is not eligible for participa-
tion until January 1, 1954.
The previous pact with the
Pacific Coast Conference con-
tamed a clause to the effect the
Big Ten could designate any
team it desired. But that stipu-
lation was removed when the
current agreement was signed
last year.
If there is an undisputed cham-
pion, the vote by athletic directors
will be a mere formality. How-
ever, a tie seems likely between
Michigan and Wisconsin. The Rose
Bowl representative in that event
won't be known until Monday
noon.

it Michigan and Wisconsin
lose, and Purdue triumphs,
Minnesota and Purdue tie for
the title. Only those four teams
have a mathematical chance for
any part of the title;
If Michigan, Wisconsin, and
Purdue all lose, then Minnesota is
undisputed champion;
If any of the top five teams tie,
then the standings would be more
confused than ever.
BIG TEN STANDINGS

W L
MICHIGAN ..,...4 1
Wisconsin .......4 1
Purdue ..........3 1
Minnesota .......3 1
Ohio State ......4 2
Illinois ..........2 4
Iowa ............2 5
Indiana .........1 4
Northwestern ....1 5

T
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0

Pct.
.800
.800
.700
.700
.667
.333
.286
.200
.167

LOST-Sterling thistle designed linked1
bracelet, last Saturday, in or near
stadium. Keepsake. Reward. 6243
Evenings. )56L
LOST - Field Glasses. Purdue game.
Reward. 3V.H-4752. )57L
LOST-Powder blue orlon sweater in
black bag in vicinity of State Street.
Call 3-8451 after 6 p.m. )58L
PERSON who got wrong coat at Drakes3
on Nov. 19th call Jack at 3-2225. )59L
LOST-Gold bow knot pin. Thurs. eve-
ning. Call 2-9129. )60L
LOST-Men's wrist watch in arboretum
area. Reward. Call 6484. )51L
FOR SALE
2 END rABLES, contemporary wrought
Iron and walnut designers' models:
reasonable manogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. 12
STUDENTS-Up to 3 off on diamonds,
watches, rings, electric shaver, silver-
ware, appliances and all other jewelry
items. Any nationally advertised pro-
ducts at these savings. Ph. Ed Neback.
Lit. '53, 3-1713. ) 159
21 x 314 PACEMAKER speed graphic,
fully equipped, like new. Phone Henry
Arnold 3-4141 )40L
PARRAKEETS, babies and breeders, ca-
naries, singers, cages and supplies. 305
W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )85
EVERGREENS
Plant till ground freezes hard.
Spreading & upright junipers 2.25, 7.50
Spreading & upright yews 2.25, 3.25
Mugbo (dwarf Pine) ........2.50, 4.50
Pyramidal & globe
Arbor Vitae ............2.50, 5.00
Call M. Lee 8574 or U. ext 2410., 91
FOR SALE-1951 Anglia 35 mpg like
new. Call 3-3177 after 4 p.m. )98
GET YOUR official Michigan ring at
Burt Patts. 1209 S. University, phone
8889. )97
MEN'S Gabardine dress pants $5.65.
well tailored, assorted colors. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington St. )99
1948 AUSTIN, two door. Call 2-2177
after 6 p.m.
CANARIES, beautiful singers and fe-
males. Also new and used bird cages.
Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th. )66
1931 MODEL A Fordor Ford. Runs well
and is in good condition. Phone
3MA-4343. )100
MARTIN CORONET, like new, with ac-
cessories and case, reasonable. Ph.
3-4440. )01
$1,000 1OWN--Cozy 4 rooms and bath,
immediate possession. Ph. 2-6697. )102
1 SOUTHERN Muskrat Coat size 14-16.
Excellent condition. Ph. 2-4014 after
4 p.m. 910 Green St. )103
GERMAN 35 m.m. camera. Many fea-
tures. Bargain price. Ph. 2-8754. )104
GRAY, genuine kidskin % fur coat. Call
Dexter 3DE-5501 after 3:30 p.m. )105
FOR RENT
GUEST HOUSE for rent.' Three rooms
and a bath $60 month, water furnish-
ed. Call 8696 daytime and 2-4632
evenings. )6F

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS-
Reserve roomis now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William inear
State). Phone 3-8454. 12R
PERSONAL
GIRLS TO MODEL WANTED - Earn
money posing for advertising photo-
graphs; some experience helpful but
not necessary. Phone Thomas F. Lacy
Advertising 3-1447 for appointment.
)31P
MEET George Meader at the Union
Sunday, Nov. 23 at 3:00 P.M. )34P
ROOM AND BOARD
SINGLE ROOM & BOARD for research
or professional man. Also double for
two (can part pay with duties in
house). Live with congenial cultured
group on campus. 520 Thompson. )4X
HELP WANTED
WANTED - Experienced salesman f(r
part time help. Must be here for
Xmas. A. A. Cut Rate. 113 So. Main.
139H
PART TIME window trimmer wanted,
male preferred. Also can do other
work if desired. Wilkinson Luggage
Shop, 3-4013. )48H
SALES LADIES-Full or part time. Ap-
ply at Dixie Shops, 211 S. Main. Phone
3-2186.
MAN for part time lab work, must have
knowledge of quantitative analysis
methods. Here is an opportunity for
some good practical experience in in-
dustrial plating by working four hours
a day. Apply Universal Die Casting
& Manufacturing Co., 232 Monroe St.,
Saline, Mich. )548
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sale and service.
Morrill's
314 S State St., Phone 7177. )88
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Freepick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020:
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & T.V.
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T.V.
"Student Service"
1215 So., Uni., Ph. 7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )15B
ALTERATIONS-Ladies' coats shorten-
ed, alteration evening dresses, suits,
etc. Alta Graves, 2-2678. 510 Catherine
St. off N. State. )22B
GOOD Rental Typewriters available at
reasonable rates. Office Equipment
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Phone 2-1213.
)4B
MISCELLANEOUS
BEEN MEANING to find out about our
student faculty and regular specials,
haven't you? Well, if you are not do-
ing anything why not inquire now.
Student Periodical Agency, 6007. )17M
TOPPER
Division and Liberty
Spaghetti and Meat Sauce
Served in the old Italian manner.
)19M

WAYNE MELCHIORI
. . . offensive center

Y
Maize and Blue Cagers Ready
For Frosh, Marquette Scraps

GREATEST IN LONG SERIES:
Michigan Edged Bucks in 1926 Thriller

Ever try to keep a band of fired-
up basketball players in peak con-
dition without actually scrimmag-
ing another team?
That's the problem Michigan
coach Bill Perigo is facing daily
down at Yost Field House. His
hustling, cagers haven't gone
through more than offensive and
defensive half-court drills over
the past week.
BUT THE fast-breaking Wolver-
ine hoopsters get a chance to break
loose next Tuesday night when
they encounter a strong freshman
unit on the Field House hardwood.
Game time is 8 p.m.
This contest will serve as a
preview of things to come when
the Maize and Blue opens its
1952-53 court campaign on
December 1 against an invading
Marquette five.
Perigo points out that the fresh-
man scrap will show whether or
not his charges have been staling
off. The figures, certainly, show
otherwise.
SINCE THE start of practice
sessions early in October, the spir-
ited Wolverines have steadily in-
creased in their field goal and free
throw percentages. Shots have been
picking up to the point where the
16-man combine has reached a
keen edge.
Things got so spirited Thurs-
day that forward candidate Paul
Geyer sustained a possibly-frac-
tured nose. The Toledo, Ohio
junior got smacked in the
schnozzola with an errant el-
bow.
Otherwise, the Wolverines are
? in top-notch condition. Forward
John Codwell has fully recovered
from a slow-healing leg muscle in-
jury that hampered him early in
the fall,
S* * *
FROSH MENTOR Dave Strack
is quite optimistic about the
chances of his yearlings to knock
off the varsity.
He's got a banner crop of pros-
pects this year. Foremost among
these are Jim Barron and Tom
Jorgenson, a pair of hustlers
hailing from Chicago.?
Barron possesses a good eye, an
accurate jump shot and holds
down one of the freshman guard
posts. He played at Chicago Fen-
wick where his team never lost a
game while he was in the lineup.
JORGENSON OWNS the most
impressive high school record of
all the newcomers. A boy with tre-
mendous potential, Jorgenson
made all-city Chicago and second
team all-state Illinois at his for-
ward spot.
Highland Park's contribution
to the first year clan is Dave
Parks, 6-4 all-state Michigan
center who rates as a top-notch
rebounder. -
An erstwhile center who aver-
aged 21 points per contest at Falls-
burg, N. Y., High School has been
converted from theepivot slot to
the backcourt. Pepper-pot Bob
Laskowitz, a quick playmaker, has
been impressive in recent work-
outs.
Frank Mcore, 6-2 forward from

Canton, Ohio, rounds out the
freshman starting five.
Also prominent in frosh plans
are forward Gary Morrison, all
Class B conference at Battle Creek
Lakeview, 6-7/z Jay Vauter from
Arlington Heights, Ill., Tom Sing-
er, formerly of South Bend Cen-
tral and Bill Whiteaker of River
Rouge.
Willowy Harvey Williams, a 6-8
center who was out of school last
year after performing briefly in
1950, is back for another whirl.

RALPH STRIBE
... there in spirit

Seven Year Winning Streak
Over Buckeyes Endangered
(Continued from Page 1)
THE DEFENSIVE PLATOON which must stop Borton and Co.
will be the same fielded in previous contests.
Headed by rugged Captain Tim Green the Maize and Blue
warriors boast the best defensive record in the Conference, hold-
ing the opposition to an average of 3.73 yards per play.
The rest of the Wolverine defensive line lists Gene Knutson at
the other end post, Balog and Art Walker at tackles, and guards Don
Dugger (brother of Ohio State's Dean) and Ron Williams.
MICHIGAN'S PASS DEFENSE which has limited five Conference
opponents to an average of less than five yards per pass play has been
working all week to stop Borton's aerial thrusts.
Either Lowell Perry or Sophomore Dah Cline will get the call
at safety. Defensive halfbacks will be Dave Tinkham and Don
Oldham, and Roger Zatkoff and Laurie LeClaire will again team
as linebackers.
Offensively, attention will be focused on tailback Ted Kress who
is only 273 yards short of Tom Harmon's Michigan record for total
yardage in one season. The lithe junior triple-threat has run and
passed for 1,099 yards in eight games this season.
* * * *
TEAMING WITH KRESS at halfback will be either senior speed-
ster Frank Howell or freshman sensation Tony Branoff. Both Howell
and Branoff average better than four yards per try and have scored
four touchdowns between them.
Ted Topor will call the signals, run, pass and block from his
familiar quarterback post. Dick Balzhiser, last week's leading
ground gainer, will get the nod at fullback.
The Maize and Blue will probably counter Ohio State's pass blitz
with some aerial fireworks of their own. Offensive ends Perry and Tad
Stanford give passers Kress, Topor and Branoff better than average
targets.
The job of opening holes in the Buckeyes' bulky forward wall
falls to Michigan tackles Ben Pederson and Dick Strozewski, guards
Bob Timm and Dick Beison and center-delux Dick O'Shaughnessy.
In the traditional rivalry which dates back to 1897 Michigan has
won 32 games, Ohio State 12, and there have been four ties. The Wol-
verines have scored 828 total points to the Buckeyes' 346.

By IVAN KAYE
Ancient gridiron adversaries
Michigan and Ohio State will write
the forty-ninth chapter of one of
the game's most illustrious rival-
ries today at Ohio Stadium in.
Columbus.
Once again this year, as in so
many years past, the contest car-
ries championship implications. A
Michigan victory will insure at
least a share of the conference
crown for the Maize and Blue.
* *. *
OF ALL THE great title strug-
gles held in the Buckeye horse-
shoe, perhaps the greatest was the
storied clash between Michigan
and the Scarlet and Grey in 1926.
Both teams entered the stad-
ium carrying perfedt confer-
ence records. The showdown was
at hand. To the victor would go
the championship of the West.
The giant concret arena was
jammed with 90,437rfans. The eyes
of the nation were focused on
Columbus. Fielding Yost's Michi-
gan squad boasted the greatest
passing combination in football,
Benny Friedman to Bennie Ooster-
baan.
OHIO COACHED by Dr. John
W. Wilce, had a powerful runner in
Marty Karow and a great place
kicker in Myers Clark.
The Buckeyes, fired to the hilt
and playing before a homecom-
ing crowd, all but ran the Wol-
verines out of the stadium in the
first quarter. Karow led a
crunching 75 yard touchdown
drive, andsbefore the stunned
Michigan squad could recover,
Clark booted a 23 yard fieldgoal
to give a 10-0 lead.
Michigan stormed back to a
touchdown with Friedman throw-
'---- Ph. 3-5651

ing 38 yards to Oosterbaan, who
raced alone behind three Ohio ae-
fenders into the end zone.
4 4 S
THE TWO SQUADS battled on
even terms until just before half-
time, when Michigan recovered a
Karow fumble on the Buckeye 44.
With time running out, Friedman
decided to try for a fieldgoal in
hope of evening the score.
With the Ohio defenders
swarming over Oosterbaan to
avert what they thought would
be a trick pass play, Friedman
had enough time to power a tre-
mendous kick over the crossbar
for the tying points.
Late in the third quarter, Fried-
man threw to Oosterbaan to put
michigan in the lead 17-10. Thus
it went until the waning moments
of the fourth quarter when the
Buckeyes rose to their greatest
heights. Karow lead the Scarlet
and Grey on a brilliant 68 yard
march that ripped the vaunted
Michigan forward wall to shreds.
ENDING
TODAY
WAR1NE R'S
''-"\ MERRIEST
:C/NIN-CO OR
MUSICAL!
COLLEGE H[P -k INJVS

WITH 25 SECONDS left in the
game, the Ohio fullback smashed
across for the touchdown that
made the score 17-16. All that was
needed for a successful conversion,
and the Buckeyes would tie for
the Big Ten title and achieve an
undefeated season.
Myers Clark, who had kicked
the fieldgoal, was called upon to
tie the score. In the gathering
dusk, he barely lifted the ball
off the ground. Seconds later
the game was history. Michigan
17, Ohio State 16.
A jubilant Fielding Yost embrac-
ed Dr. Wilce at the center of the-
field. The Michigan coach mutter-
ed "John, it should have been a
tie." The good doctor was silent.
He knew what the future held, for
within another year he was to re-
turn to the medical profession.

ENDING TODAY

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ENDING TODAY

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