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November 22, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-11-22

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1952

RESEARCH RESULTS:
No Political Change in AEC

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
fourth in a series of articles dealing
with Phoenix Project progress de-
signed to give a picture of research
efforts in both the physical and social
sciences.
By VIRGINIA VOSS
Periodical change-overs in pub-
lic offices affect most government-
al studies, but a Phoenix project
investigating- political aspects of
atomic energy willi have to con-
Government
Draft Policy
Under Fire
The Government's policy of
granting draft deferments was cri-
ticized this week by the president
of Harvard University, the Asso-
ciated Press reported.'
President James B. Conant said
that the manner in which defer-
ments now are being granted is
symptomatic of the unwillingness
of the American people to "face
up to the threats to our security-
to face up to the long-term impli-
cation of a divided world in an
atomic age."
"Congress and the Administra-
tion have decided to take the cal-
culated risk of leaving close to
2,000,000 men (actually 1,700,000)
in a deferred status as regards
military service for the next two
years,"Conant told the board of
trustees of the Committee for Eco-
nomic Development.
"Many of these will never be
called if present deferment poli-
cies are continued; they are to all
intents and purposes exempt."
"What is required for the mor-
ale of the young men is a clear
outline of what lies ahead-a plan,
a fair plan and a certain one."
IIe declared, "Boys now in their
early teens ought to be able to
know under what alternatives they
can plan their education anl when
they will be called."
Prof. Slosson
To Give Tanlk
Prof. Preston Slosson, of the his-
tory department will speak on
"Racism in South Africa," before
the campus UNESCO group at 8
p.m. tomorrow at the Internation-
al Center.
According to Richard LaBarge,
president of the council, Prof.
Slosson will present a brief sum-
mary of the historical background
leading to the recent- flare-ups in
South Africa, and then discuss
the present political situation in
this area.
Refreshments will be served fol-
lowing the address. "Students, fa-
culty members, and townspeople
are invited to attend the lecture,"
LaBarge said.
At the business meeting follow-
ing Prof. Slosson's speech, a new
secretary for the UNESCO council
will be chosen.
SDA To Discuss
McCarran Bill
Prof. John P. Dawson, of the!
Law School will address a meeting
of the Students for Democratic Ac-
tion, on the topic of the McCar-
ran Bill at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, in
the Union.
After Prof. Dawsons speedh, the
SDA will hold a regular business
meeting, at which time they will
consider a program for the re-
mainder of the semester.

Sweater Hop
The annual Union Sweater
Hop will be held from 9 p.m. to
midnight today in the Union
Ballroom.
Local merchants will be on
hand at the dance to award
prizes to the couple sporting
the most original sweater at-
tire.
Re . afIer

Secretary-Appointee Wilson
To Accompany Ike to Korea

tend with few Eisenhower admin-
istration changes in 1953.
The group has found both the
Atomic Energy Commission and
the Joint Congressional Commit-
tee on Atomic Energy to be rela-
tively free from political fluctua-
tions.
THE $17,800 project is an ex-
ample of Phoenix' attempts to de-
termine the implications atomic
power has in social science fields.
1Project researchers feel there is
a greater need for stimulation of
work along this line.
Typical of the 54 studies al-
lotted Phoenix funds, the public
administration project works as
an "interdisciplinary" study, in-
cluding three political scientists
and two economists on its staff
along with advisors from several
other departments.
One of the staff-men, Prof.
Richard A. Tybout of the eco-
nomics department, has under-
graduate training. in engineering
which was put to use when he
served on an Army group investi-
gating residual radiation in Hiro-
shima and Nagasaki after the
atomic bombings.
THE three-month old project
has barely had time to compute
the first statistic in its analysis of
such factors as political party and
pressure group influence on Atom-
ic Energy Commission policy.
Policy, in this case, becomes a
Fellowships,
Research Get
Fund Grants
(Continued from Page 1)
mark include: $2,969.19 for the
Stream Analysis Research Fund;
$2,673.15 for the Edwin S. George
Reserve Improvement- Fund; $2,-
500 for a five-year continuation of
the Borden Undergraduate Re-
search Award in Medicine; and a
$2,500 sum from David Gray, Jr. of
Detroit for financial assistance to
students.
Three pharmaceutical chem-
istry fellowships will be renew-
ed with $1,700 and two $1,500
sums from the Monsanto Chem-
ical Corporation and the U-
John Co. respectively.
Thousand dollar sums went to
the Palentology Accessions Fund
and the Varsity "M" Club Schol-
arship.
AMONG grants of less than
$1,000, the University Alumni Fund
division of the Development Coun-
cil received its first contribution-
a $200 sum from the University of
Michigan Club of Lansing.
The Regents also okayed the
offer of the Class of 1953 to fill
a gap in University tradition by
replacing the recently removed
seal in front of the Library with
a similar memorial.
Fourteen committee appoint-
ments to the Board in Control of
the University Hospital, and to
the Executive Committees of the
Summer Session, the Clements Li-
brary Associates and the School of
Dentistry were approved by the
Regents yesterday.
The granting of five leaves of1
absence, two of them for military
purposes, completed Regents ac-
tion.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

unique consideration since the
AEC is one of the few govern-
mental areas "not subject to the
usual dynamics of full public
criticism and scrutiny, accord-
ing to full-time staffer Jason L.
Finkle.

DETROIT-(1')-On his trip to
Korea President-Elect Gen. Dwight
D. Eisenhower will have the com-
pany of the man he has chosen as
his Secretary of Defense.
The Secretary-Appointee, Gen-
eral Motors' President Charles E.
Wilson, will make the trip with
Eisenhower.

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There exists what Finkle called AFTER FIRST refusing to make
the "sacred cow" attitude toward Tany direct comment on a report
atomic energy policy which pro- Lecture that Wilson would go along, the
duces a general public apathy to- ---- corporation later confirmed it.
ward the commission's workings Rep. George Meader. of the Sec-
leading to a different pattern of ond Congressional District, will
pressure group influences. give his "Personal Predictions Olson To Tali
Although the project's research Concerning the 83rd Congress," at
director Prof. Morgan Thomas of 3 p.m., tomorrow, in Room 3S ofCt
the political science department the Union before a gathering of on erence
pointed out that security regula- the Young Republicans.
tions have not yet restricted the Ned Simon, president of the YR Prof. Willard C. Olson, dean of
group's study, the tight lid Club, announced that the meeting the School of Education, will be
kept on closed hearings of the is open to Democrats as well as essayist at the two-day- 11th An-
Joint Congressional Committee on Republicans. He also pointed out nual Post-Graduate Dental Re-
Atomic Energy is expected to that a Sunday meeting is unique view of the Detroit District So-
make observation more difficult. to the club. He said that if the ciety Monday in Detroit.
The methodology involved is a discussion proved a success, the His topic will be "Your Child
combination of social and scien- YRs would continue to schedule Patient."
tific analysis. Significant persons future meetings on Sundays. On the day after the meeting,
on the AEC and in Congress will Rep. Meader, who defeated his Prof. Olson will leave for Paris,
be interviewed, experts will be Democratic opponent Prof. John P. France, to serve as a representa-
called in for conferences and all Dawson of the Law School in the tive of the U.S. National Commis-
published hearingsof the commis- recent congressional campaign, sion for UNESCO at a three-weeks
sion will be scrutinized by a sci- has just returned from Washing- Conference on Education and
entific method known as "content ton where he had been terminat- Mental Health of Children of Eur-
analysis." ing his work in the 82nd Congress. ope.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

G
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A GM spokesman, in keeping
with strict security measures
being applied to details of the
general's trip, went no further
than a simple confirmation.
The only quotation attributed to
Wilson, 62-year-old head of the
big corporation, was a "yes"-
he had been "asked to go" and
he had accepted.
It was not even divulged who
specifically had made the request
of Wilson.
Up until the final confirmation
the company had avoided either
confirming or denying the pub-
lished report.
"I can't answer that question,"
was the only authorized comment
from Wilson.
Robert Q. Lewis
To P ig 'M'Opera
Robert Q. Lewis, alumnus of the
of the University and well-known
entertainer will appear on Arthur
Godfrey's program at 8 p.m. Mon-
day, and will publicize this year's
Union Opera "No Cover Charge."
"No Cover Charge" will be per-
formed Dec. 10, 11, 12.

Driving home
for
Thanksgiving?
, DRIVE CAREFUL
and
* BE SAFE!

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TnE ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Streets

State Street at Nickels Arcade

1108 South University

' Daily Classifieds Bring Quick Results *

1, .

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
21 a.m. on Saturday.)
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1952
VOL. LXIII, No. 53
Notices
Late permission for women students
who attended the Horowitz concert
Wednesday night, Nov. 19, will be no
later than 11:20 p.m.
Late permission for women students
who attended the Oratorical Associa-
tion Lecture on Thurs., Nov. 20, will
be no later than 10:50 p.m.
Teaching Positions Sn Texas. The
University Bureau of Appointments has
recently received notices of several va-
cancies in Texas. Qualified persons whoe
are interested in teaching in Texas are
advised to contact the University Bu-
reau of Appointments and Occupation-
al Information, 3528 Administration
Building or telephone University ex-
tension 2614.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of Fine Arts. "Indian In-
fluence on the Pre-Buddhist Art of Chi-
na," Dr. Alfred Salmony, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Fine Arts, New York Univer-
sity, Mon., Nov. 24, 4:15 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheater.
Academic Notices
Orientation seminar in Mathematics
will meet on Mon., Nov. 24, at 3 p.m. in
3001 Angell Hall. The group will discuss
the Axiom of Choice and Logical Dif-
culties. Dr. Rainich will lead the dis-
cussion.
Interdepartmental Seminar in Meth-
ods of Machine Computation. Meeting
of Mon., Nov. 24, postponed because of
conflict with Engineering faculty
meeting. The seminar subject will be
given at the beginning of next semes-
ter.
Events Today
Faculty Sports Night. I.M. Building,
7:30-10:00 p.m. All equipment will be

available for faculty families. For fur-
their information call Mrs. Dixon, 25-
8475.
Newman Club. Watch the Michigan-
Ohio game with friends and faculty
members at the Clubrooms of St. Mary's
Chapel. Refreshments. Game time is 2
p.m.
Saturday Luncheon Discussion, Lane
Hall, 12:15 p.m. Speaker: The Rev. Ed-
ward Burkhardt.
Beacon. Lunch at noon in the League
Cafeteria. Adjourn at 1:15 to Profes-
sor Price's studio in Burton Tower
to read a play.
Coming Events
Speech and Hearing Society. Meeting
Mon., Nov. 24, 7:30 p.m., East Confer-
ence Room of the Rackham Building.
Le Cercle Francais will meet at 8
p.m. Mon., Nov. 24, in the League. The
skit which was presented at the Monte-
Carlo Party will be regiven and otherI
entertainment wil be provided. All stu-
dents are invited.
Hillel is sponsoring a "Rikud" on
Sun., Nov. 23, from 7:30-10:30 p.m. This
will be an evening of dancing, refresh-
ments, and games with prizes. Every-
one is invited.
Hillel Music Committee will meet
Mon., Nov. 24, in the Hillel music room
at 7 p.m. All members and those
who wish to work on the committee
please be present.

Young Democrats will meet on Mon.,
Nov. 24, at 8 p.m. in the Union, Room
3-D. Prof. Samuel Eldersveld, of the
Political Science Dept., will speak on
the implications of the recent, elec-
tion and propose a positive program
for action. All those interested are in-
vited.
Young Republicans. There will be a
general club meeting Sunday afternoon
at 3 p.m. in Room 3-S of the Union.
The speaker will be Congressman George
Meader, from this district. The topic
will be "The New Republican Legisla-
tive Program." Refreshments. New
members are ,nvited.
Phi Lambda Upsilon. Meeting, Mon.,
Nov. 24, Rackham Bldg., West Confer-
ence Room, 7:30 p.m., Dr. Lloyd Kempe
wiil speak on "Microbiology in Chemis-
try and Engineering."
The DINNER
BELL
Open 5 P M -8 P M. Sun.
WHOLESOME MEALS
Priced 60c-$1.50
808 $South State

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WHERE TO WORK?

With so many positions available today, this is a
problem that faces many young women. These are
a few of the things that you may require of your job:

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Nov. 23-Soul and Body.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 A.M.: Student Bible class, 1st Samuel.
11:00 A.M.: "Priorities."
7:00 P.M.: Prof. Arthur Dunham, of the 'Dept.
of Sociology, will discuss, "The Conflict be-
tween Individualism and Social Responsibility."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Leonard Parr
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship: Sermon "Thanks-
giving-ond a Spirit of Acceptance," Rev. De-
Witt C .Baldwin, Director of Lane Hall and
the Student ReligiousrAssociation.
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES GUILD
7:00 P.M.: The group will meet to sort, mend,
and pock clothes for overseas.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Rev. Henry J. Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Rev. Wm. S. Baker, Student Minister
Sunday Morning Service: 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.,
Henry Kuizenga preaching, "Thanks, Destiny
and Faith."
Sunddy Morning 10:00, Student Bible Seminar.
Sunday Evening, 6:30, Westminster Guild.
Speaker-Rev. Kenneth Reeves, Director of
the Board of Student Work of the Presbyterian
Board of Christian Education, from Philadel-
phia, Pa.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mrs. W. S. Bicknell, Parish Assistant
Mr.sE. J. Schuss, Student Advisor
Miss Jane Townsend, Organist
FIRST UNITARIAN .......... ....
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group-Mr. W. S.
Bicknell reviewing Fahs' "Today's Children and
Yesterday's Heritage," chapter, "It Matters
How We Get Our Beliefs."
11:00 A.M.: Services. Sermon "Unity of Spirit"
by Rev. Edward H. Redman.
5:00 P.M.: Jr. AUY at home of Mrs. Paul Dwyer.
7:15 P.M.: Unitarians students. Square Danc=
ing at home of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Whitaker,
406 Lenawee Drive, Phone 5745.
Monday-8 P.M.: Annual Meeting of the Con-
gregation.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:0 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast).
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis.
5:15 P.M.: High School Club.
6:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club (Univ. students),
Canterbury House. Mr. W. Lloyd Berridge
will be the speaker.
8:00 P.M.: Eveting Prayer, Chapel.
Wednesday 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
Thanksgiving Day 9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
Friday, 12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council).
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Sunday 9:25 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 A.M.: Services at Center & Trinity Church.
10:45 A.M.: Zion Church.
7:00 P.M.: Student Talent Program.
Tuesday 7:30 P.M.: "Teachings of the Denom-
inations."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers-
9:35 A.M.: Discussion Class, Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Dr. Large preaching "This I Believe";
Worship.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45'P.M.: Worship and Program-C. Grey
Austin will lead a discussion following up on
Rev. Pike entitled, "The Individual and .His
Faith."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "Thanksgiving in Thought, Word, pnd
Deed."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Illustrated lecture
by Missionary John Wilenius, on furlough from
mission work in the Far East.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
7:00 Tonight: Rev. Richard Rohland of Protes-
tant Youth Organization.
Sunday, 10:00 A.M.: Bible School--Missionaries
in all departments.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship Service. Guest
speaker, Mr. Wilbur Sutherland, General Sec-
retary of Canadian Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship.
6:00 P.M.: Grace Bible Guild supper.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service-Rev. Earl Gilmore
of Rural Bible Mission.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday. Thanksgiving Prayer
and Praise Service.

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Good wages

Regular salary increases
Congenial co-workers
Pleasant surroundings
Chance for advancement
Permanent employment
We can offer all of these things to qualified young
women. We have openings in November and Decem-
ber for telephone operators and clerical employees.
M~ichigan2 ell elephone Co.
323 E. Washington

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George W. Barger, Minister
Sunday, November 23
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: Let's Talk Turkey.
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
Mar ilynn Williams, Associate Director
Tuesday Student Tea: 4:30-6:00.
Sunday, Nov. 23, 7:00 Congregational Church.
The group will sort, mend and pack clothes
to go overseas.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service, Sermon by Rev.
A. H. Meyer, a guest minister from Detroit,
"Our Home."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild at Lane Hall.

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y.M.C.A. AUDITORIUM
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Thursdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth"
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