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October 11, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-11

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

_________________________________________________________ U

Sectional Games
Top Grid Card
Penn-Princeton, Maryland-Georgia
Oklahoma-Texas, Outstanding Tilts

Presbyterians Capture
Second Straight Victory
Lutherans, Nakamuras, Foresters Gain
Triumphs in Independent Football Contests

ELKIHE

NEW YORK (IP)-Three games
that have everything and one that
will have everybody make up the
big four of college football today
for the season's first Saturday
when football will draw undivided
attention.
The three that combine tradi-
tion, red hot rivalries and mighty
teams are Princeton vs. Penn in
the East's Ivy League, Maryland
vs. Georgia in the South and Okla-
homa vs. Texas in the Southwest.
THE OTHER is the weekly "tel-
evision game" between Michigan
* * *
Badgers Vie
lxwithBucks
COLUMBUS (R5) - Wisconsin,
with its eye on the Rose Bowl,
and Ohio State, with its eye on anj
upset, clash today in the Big Ten's
top tilt before a crowd of some 79,-
000.
The unbeaten Badgers, rated No.
1 in the co ntry, were favored to
win by at l ast a touchdown. But
the Bucks, smarting from last
week's 21-14 loss to Purdue, are
conceding nothing.
* * *
THE COLD figures don't give
the Bucks much of a chance. But
it was the same a year ago when
the Bucks were soutplayed from
start to finish and emerged with
a 6-6 deadlock.
Coach Woody Hayes of the
Bucks defied tradition last night
by telling a business men's club:
"Give us the same breaks we had
a year ago, and we'll beat Wiscon-
sin Saturday."
WISCONSIN hasn't won on the
Ohio field since 1918, and hasn't
copped the Western Conference
crown since 1912, but Ivy William-
son's classy crew has a hunch this
is the year to end the long famine.
Williamson, quietly confident,
told nwesmen he thought he had
a pretty good team, that morale
was excellent any physical con-
dition good, and "We have a
pretty good backfield to advance
that ball."
The bristling backs-Sophomore
Jim Haluska at quarter, Juniors
Jerry Witt and Harland Carl at
the halves and Sophomore Alan
Ameche at full--is fourth in na-
tional offense with 447.5 yards per
game.

State and Texas A. & M. at East
Lansing, Mich., which will be
watched by countless fans who
can't go to other games-and prob-
ably by many who could.
In the Ivy League, where foot-
ball again has become a by-
product of academic progress,
Penn and Princeton are the only
teams strong enough to break
into the headlines nationally.
Princeton, boasting a 24-game
winning streak, was ranked tenth
in the nation in the Associated
Press poll this week. Penn only
drew passing mention, but in try-
ing to pick the winner, the experts
had to settle for a tossup.
PRINCETON, according to ri-
val scouts, is the only Ivy team
that really can "move" on offense.
But Penn, with two slambang full-
backs, Joe Varaitis and Don Zim-
mer, contesting for the No. 1 spot,
plus Bones Adams, Bill Deuber,
and Walt Hynoski, could break
loose any time.
The Quakers have a big of-
fensive line and a strong de-
fensive unit to back it up.
Princeton may have to weaken
its attack to build up its defens-
ive platoon.
Texas and Oklahoma haven't
lived up to their pre-season ratings
yet. Texas dropped a tough one to
Notre Dame and Oklahoma was
tied by Colorado. But they have a
pair of potent teams.
* * *
IN A RIVALRY that dates only
from the 1948 Gator Bowl game,
Georgia, an impressive winner of
three games, figures to give fourth-
ranked Maryland a real tussle in
a duel between two exceptional
passers, Maryland's-Jack Scarbath
and Zeke Bratkowski of Georgia.
Michigan State, rated No. 1
in the pre-season polls, dropped
behind Wisconsin this week aft-
er barely squeaking past Michi-
gan and Oregon State. Texas
A. & M. doesn't figure to be as
strong as those two, but should
provide enough action for the
televiewers.
Defending its top ranking and a
share of the BigTen lead, Wiscon-
sin plays rugged Ohio State at Co-
lumbus while challenging Pardue
takes on Iowa.
OTHER GAMES of special in-
terest will send California, the No.
3 team in the weekly ratings,
against Oregon; fifth-ranked
GeorgiavTech against a possible
toughie, Tulane; Duke, No. 6,
against South Carolina, and Kan-
sas, No. 9, against Iowa State.

FRANK HOWELL
... hampered halfback
Hurley Gains
Starting Role
In Backfield
Pederson Moves
Into Guard Spot
(Continued from Page 1)
Teaming with Hurley in the
offensive backfield will be Ted
Topor at quarterback, Ted Kress
in the tailback berth and fresh-
man Tony Branoff at wingback.
Kress' 3.5 rushing average is
tops for Michigan's starting
backfield. Lefty Topor paces
Wolverine passers with 202 yards
on 22 throws.
Michigan's offensive forward
wall will feature ends Lowell
Perry and Tad Stanford, tackles
Dick Strozewski and Pederson,
guards Bob Timm and Dick Bei-
son, and pivot man Dick O'-
Shaughnessy;
* * *
THE MAIZE and Blue defensive
backfield may well be the key fac-
tor in Wolverine victory plans.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan and his
assistants have been working all
week on pass defense, realizing
that they must stop D'Achille aid
Company if they are to bounce
back into the win column.
Linebackers Rog Zatkoff and
Laurie LeClaire will once again
man the linebacker positions.
Veteran Dave Tinkham will team
with Russ Rescorla, Branoff or
Don Oldham at defensive half-
back, and Perry and Oldham
will probably alternate at safety.
Frank Howell, still hampered by
an ankle injury incurred in the
MSC battle, has responded to
treatments and may see limited
action at defensive halfback.
* * *
CAPTAIN Merritt Green is a
doubtful starter at defensive left
end. A sprained ankle suffered in
practice may force the senior
flanker to remain on the sidelines.
If so, he will likely be replaced by
Jim Bates, a sophomore wingman
from Farmington, Mich.
Rugged Gene Knutson will again
fill the right end post. Defensive
tackles will be sophomore Art
Walker and Jim Balog, 210-pound
junior letterman. Don Dugger and
Bob Matheson will answer the call
at guard.
Both squads boast better than
average punters. Michigan's Bill
Billings has compiled a fine 44.0
average on nine boots this season.
Hoosier Florian Helinski, the Big
Ten's best freshman punter in
1951, has toed seven kicks 296
yards, an average of 42.3.
The Wolverines hold a 15-4
game edge in a series dating back
to 1900. Indiana's last win over
Michigan was a 13-7 triumph in
1945. Michigan holds a 469-87
edge in total points over the years.

By ARNOLD SARYA
Gil Rodger's passing sparked the
Presbyterian grid squad to its sec-
ond straight win of the season as
it downed International Center,
25-0, yesterday afternoon.
Rodger tossed to Dick Little in
the end zone for the first tally and
also connected with Little for the
extra point. Later in the first half,
Rodger completed an aerial to
Russ Williams to give the Presby-
terian squad a 13-0 half-time lead.
IN THE SECOND half, Rodger,
intercepted a pass and went over
for the third touchdown of the
game. He threw another pass to
Little to complete the scoring for
the day.
The Lutheran Student Associ-
ation team conquered the Ha-
waiian squad, 12-0. Boyd Hart-
man hit Jim Wiggert in the
end zone with a 25 yard pitch
just before the whistle at the
half.
At the start of the next half,
LSA drove down field, but lost the
ball on downs. On the next play,
Frank Norman recovered a fumble
and brought the pigskin to the Ha-
waiian five yard line.
*; * *
TWO PLAYS later, Hartman
ran around right end into pay
territory to give LSA its last tal-
ly.
In the lowest scoring contest
of the day, Nakamura Co-op de-
feated Lester Co-op 2-0. Harry
Weston tagged Dick Hostetler
who was dropping back for a
pass in the end zone, to account
for Nakamura's two points.
Pharmacy was shutout as the
Foresters scored 14 points in the
second half. Both Jack Williams
and Jack McArdle plunged over
the goal line for the Foresters'
tallies. The same two men made
their own extra points.
* *
THE CLOSEST game was be-
tween Standish-Evans and Can-
terbury as the former edged out
a 7-6 triumph in overtime play.
Standish-Evans' Bob Steven and
Frank Greene of Canterbury
scored the touchdowns.
The tilt between Newman and
Michigan Christian Fellowship
resulted in a 13-12 score favor-
Brown KO'd
By Araujo
In New York
NEW YORK P)-One .flashing
left hook to the jaw by George
Araujo knocked out Joe Brown of
New Orleans in 1:2 of the seventh
round of a nationally telecast ten
rounder at St. Nicholas arena Fri-
day night. Araujo, a 7 to 5 under-
dog, weighed 132%2 to Brown's
134%.
* * *
THE SUDDEN finish to what
had been a dull fight, brought the
crowd of 2,099 gross gate $4,402
to its feet.
Araujo, a 21-year-old light-
weight contender from Provi-
dence, made a lightning turn
near the ropes and shot a left
to his 26-year-old rival's jaw.
Brown fell over the middle rope
and then sagged to the floor. He
got on his knees at six and bare-
ly raised himself up as refree Ray
Miller counted ten and waved him
out.
Late Grid Scores
Bucknell 19, Temple 12
Boston U. 9, Miami 7
V. M. I. 28, Florida State 7
Boston College 20, Drake 14

ing Newman. Tony Steimle made
the vital point for the victors.
The remaining game in the In-
dependent League was between
Actuaries and Roger Williams, as
the former ended on the heavy
end of a 13-0 score.
The protested game of last
Tuesday between Sigma Phi and
Phi Kappa Sigma was replayed
yesterday at South Ferry Field.
Sigma Phi scored the only tally
of the game when Bruce BradshawI
ran for five yards to make the
score 6-0.
'Eager Aggies
Hope to End
MSCStreak
EAST LANSING-(P)-A hun-
gry Texas A & .M team, with its
hopes riding on a T attack, in-
vaded the home grounds of Mich-
igan State College yesterday.
The eager Aggies from College
Station, Tex., are planning to pass
like crazy in an all-out try to turnz
Saturday's television Game of the
Week into the football upset of
the week.
* * *
"THEY'RE real eager," said
Head Coach Ray George of his
Texans. "We have a lot of con-!
fident sophomores and with luck
they figure they can beat any-
body. They're not coming up here
just for the ride."
In contrast, Coach Biggie_
Munn's Michigan State team is
well stocked with experienced,
and some think game-weary,
Seniors. Michigan State is shoot-
ing for its 18th straight win.
"They're all way up when they
meet us," said Munn. "That's the
trouble with having a high rat-
ing and a string like we have. The
pressure keeps mounting and
everyone is gunning for you."
*6 *$ *
ALTHOUGH the last 17-14 win
over Oregon State was far from
impressive, Michigan State, in
second place in the Associated
Press poll, was the solid pre-game
favorite.
Texas A & M stock rose to-
day, however, when it was
learned that two key players
sidelined by injuries earlier this
season probably would be suit-
ed for the game.
Making the plane trip with the
42-man squad were end Eric Mill-
er, a top pass receiver, and offen-
sive guard Marshall Rush, one of
the few line starters back from
last year.
* * *
SCOUTING reports here indi-
cate the Texas strategy will be to
fill the air with footballs all af-
ternoon with hopes of completing
enough passes to offset the strong-
er Michigan State ground attack.
Quarterback Ray Graves, who
works from the T formation, is
expected to do most of the pass-
ing. MSC scouts say Graves, a
fast and tricky runner, is a
double threat since most of the
plays leave him the option of
carrying the ball.
Tom Yewcic, new at quarter-
back this season, will do the'pass-
ing for Michigan State. The main
Michigan State power, however, is
expected to be generated by
Munn's platoons of talented backs.
Sign up for Senior Pictures, 1
p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Deadline is Fri., Oct. 17.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Parker 51 pen with name on bar-
rel. Call Judith Palmer 2-6723. )11L
LOST-Red leather billfold, Wednesday.
Please return to Mary Sue Shoop
2-3912. )12L
FOR SALE
2 END TABLES, contemporary wrought
iron and walnut designers' models;
reasonable mahogany bowls and oil
painting. 9455, Mr. Hoffman. )2
UNDERWOOD portable typewriter in
good condition. Phone 2-2377 between
1-3 p.m. or evenings. ?25
TAILS and accessories, size 38-40. $20.00.
,Excellent condition. Bob Benson 2-3776.
)30
FOR SALE-Diamond engagement ring.
Never worn. Beautiful, flawless. Need
tuition money. Pay cash or on time
running as lang as through June. Call
3-2904. )9
UNIVERSITY of Michigan pottery ash
tray. Regular 1.25 Special, 75c. Bur
Patts. 1209 South University. )39
SMALL gate-leg table, swivel desk chair,
and large white gas range and other
household articles. 562 S. Seventh.
Ph. 5330. )38,
Sign up for Senior Pic-
tures, .. p.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Deadline is Fri., Oct. 17.
r ~

FOR SALE
EVERGREENS
Spreading Juniper(3 kinds) $2.25-$7.50
Upright Juniper (3 kinds) $1.95-$5.00
Pyramidal Arborvitae...... $2.00-$5.00
Common Arborvitae (5-7 ft.) .. $2.50
Mugho (Dwarf) Pine ...$2.00-$4.50
Scotch Pine (4-7 ft.) Youdig ....$1.95
Samples at 1422 wash. Hts.
Call Michael Lee, 8574. )3
TUX, Size 39, seldom worn, excellent
condition. A real bargain. Call Dick,
2-8809. )40
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State). Phone 3-8454. )2R_
FOOTBALL weekend guest rooms avail-
able. Student Room Bureau. Phone
Don Tewes, 3-8454 8 a.m.-11 p.m. J3R
SINGLE ROOM-Hollywood bed, maid
service, hot plate privileges, refrigera-
tor privileges, modern bathroom facili-
ties, near campus. Call 2-7108 and ask
for John Black. )8R
WOMAN to share attractive apt. Ph.
3-2539 after 5. )14R
LARGE DOUBLE ROOM-On Campus
for two girls. Kitchen privileges. In-
quire 312 S. Thayer after 6 p.m. )15R
ROOMS FOR RENT-Three male stu-
dents. Cooking privileges. Half block
from campus. 417 E. Liberty. )16R
ROOM AND BOARD
CO-EDS!! Inexpensive meals. We have
room for one roomer, 5 boarders. Owen
Co-op, 1017 Oakland. Call 7211. )3X
PERSONAL
KEEPSAKE, REWARD-Will person who
bought 1921 silver dollar, with initial
"E" on face, from State Street bank,
phone 2-2982.
AFTER hitch-hiking in Europe, Amer-
ica and Alaska, two Michigan sopho-
mores would like to hitch-hike to the
Northwestern games with two coeds.
For references and more information
write Box 2 Michigan Daily. )13P

PERSONAL
Life Life Life Life Life
is is is is is
9c 9c 9c 9c 9c
Student Periodical Agency, 6007 )13P
HELP WANTED
NEED 3 or 4 apple pickers after or be-
tween classes. Experience preferred.
Phone Whitmore Lake 5601, John
Mitacek, 9385 Spencer Rd. )7H
CAMPUS GIRLS interested in extra
money. Beauty counselors can use 25
snappy, peppy co-eds to sell lipstick,
deodorants etc. in spare time. Call
2-1729. )20H
WANTED-Commercial Art Student to
work with free lance writer of chil-
dren's stories. Ph. 3-1669. )23H
PHOTOGRAPHER to take Hayden House
pictures. Call 2-4591-318 Hayden. )22H
TYPIST WANTED-Full time preferred,
part time will be considered if avail-
able for 15 to 20 hours per week, good
salary. Apply at Follett's Book Store.
322 S. State.
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING - Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
TAILORING, alterations, restyling, spe-
cializing in children's apparel. Accur-
ate fittings. Phone 9708. )9B
ALTERATIONS - Ladies' garments,
prompt service. Call 2-2678. Catherine
St., near State. )1B
MISCELLANEOUS
PLAYTIME CARE OF CHILDREN
In my home. Educational toys, play-
ground equipment. Sat. also. Phone
3-1037. )1M
TOPPER
Division and Liberty
Pasties served every Wed. evening.
Come in and get acquainted. Ph. 8073.
)9M
BARBER SHOP HARMONY -- Students
cordially invited to meeting of S.P.E.-
B.S.Q.S.A., 8:30 P.M. Tues., Schwaben
Hall, 217 South Ashley. )10M

Starting
TODAY

F~1Eh U

Late Show
Tonight
at 10:50

tthey+ conquered the
Northwest I
In he pi
r} tradition o
- yThe Covered
Wagon and
: 'Cimnarron"
'Nothtit too bne -p i
oortov... . OWARD A K
neitheryoar color
t' nor Wiel
starring,
KIRK DOUGLAS . DEWEY MARTIN
-ELIZABETH THREATT
A ARTHUR JIUNNICUTIT

ON SATURDAY NIGHT
It's Topflight .. .
DANCING
at the Union Ballroom...9-12

hW the rod M
,
UNUSUAL TIME SCHEDULE
Shows Today Only at
1:10-3:30-6:00 - 8:25 - 10:50

M=16

D11fflOv f! 11 -;.,
R Ki '
RAR
7CM

Ph. 5651
0 rph

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Cm An Intimate'
Bringing Cinema
ENDS SUNDAY From All N

F R'L8EGR3-SATON p*'"I"
IN C
ANYTIN
CTANH 1APPEI
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Theatre
a Triumphs
,ations
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Coming Sunday
RITA
HAYWORTH
in
"AFFAIR IN TRINIDAD"

MEMO

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Cinema SL Gilt{

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-

ENDS TONIGHT
"THE GIRL IN WHITE"
-- PLUS -
"LURE OF THE WILDERNESS"

-

THE ARTS THEATER
opens its fall season with
"CROSS PURPOSE"
by ALBERT CAMUS
October 17 through November 2
$5.00 Season Memberships now on sale at
The Theater, Bob Marshall's, Wahr's, Music Center

j;
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ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
Friday -Saturday
from 5:30 on
5ennY ~ TAQQ1NG
SUZY DELAIR
WINNER
OF THE
Complete Shows at GRAND PRIX
30,:15,9:30INTERNATIONAL
Feature at 5:30, 7:50, 10:15

I

or

-STARTS SUNDAY
M-G-M's GAY
ROMANCE WT MUSC BY
JEROME KERN
starring
KATHRYN GRAYSON
RED SKELTON
HOWARD KEEL
Marge & Gower Champion
Ann Miller
Zsa Zsa Gabor-Kurt Kasznar
PLUS

11

Resuming.
TWO-HOUR

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Farm
Cupboard
Food You'll
Remember

DRY CLEANING SERVICE
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE
Service Available

*1

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