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October 11, 1952 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-11

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V

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OC'T'OBER 11, 1952

PAGE FOUR SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1952

NON-ACADEMIC ORGANIZA TIONS: .
Radio, TV Units Exist Independently

By VIRGINIA VOSS
The University's extensive radio
and television broadcasts repre-
sent the campus to an increasing-
ly wide state #udience, but with
few exceptions they are produced
and presented by groups uncon-
nected with the student body.
This policy of separating speech
department functions from actual
broadcast schedules has been fol-
lowed for 25 years by the Univer-
sity and is generally used by the
rest of the nation's campuses. Ac-
cording to most officials concerned
with radio and TV production, it
is the only successful way to do ex-
tensive broadcasting.
* * *
BOTH THE University's radio
station, WUOM, and the two-year
old television unit are non-aca-
demic producing organizations re-
sponsible only to a public service
coordinating body and the Board
of Regents, and independent of the
speech department in financial
and personnel considerations.
Integration between broad-
casting units and academic pro-
grams is achieved in. several
ways. Personnel-wise, the direc-
tor of TV production for, the
University, Prof. Garnet R. Gar-
rison, is also head of radio and
TV education in the speech de-
partment.
The television service's biggest
current shoWa, a weekly telecourse
which to date has presented 1751
professors, would be lost without
"faculty talent" to deliver its ed-
ucational talks and prepare sup-
plementary written material.
IN THE RADIO field, stationI
WUOM finds more opportunities
to use student material in its 65
hours a week on the air than does
the TV unit, which is limited by
lack of a local station to three
weekly shows.
According to WUOM director
Waldo Abbot about 125 students
are used yearly in radio produc-
tion. Drama shows are put on by

# * *

* * *

-Daily-Alan Reid
TELECOURSE LECTURER PHILLIP TAYLOR REHEARSES IN ANGELL HALL STUDIOS
-* * * 4>* * *

State To Take
19-Year-Olds
In Draft Soon
LANSING (P)-A draft of 19-
year olds will be necessary in
Michigan by January, Lt. Col. Ar-
thur A. Holmes, state selective
service director, said yesterday.
Col. Holmes said that between
2,400 and 2,500 men must be
called from Michigan as a part
of the national draft call for 47,-
000 men in December.
He said that about 3,500 men
turn 20 years old each month in
Michigan but because of defer-
ments and other reasons only
about 1,200 are eligible for the
draft.
"We are running out .of 20-year
olds," he said. "This means we
must take about another 1,200 each
month from the 19-year old
group. It will be a couple of
months, however, before we elim-
inate all the 20-year olds."
Col. Holmes said that only a
change in national draft policies
would avert the 19-year old draft.
There is no indication of such a
change, he said.
M~cCormick
Plans rTo Pick
His Candidate
NEW YORK (MP)LPublisher Rob-
ert R. McCormick of the Chicago
Tribune yesterday said he will
editorially endorse a presidential
candidate before Nov. 4.
McCormick was on his way to
New Haven, Conn., for a 'reunion
of the class of 1903 at Yale.
McCormick said the Republican
presidential candidate, Dwight D.
Eisenhower, was making a "very
surprisingly good" campaign to
date. He told newsmen his plans
for a third major political party
will remain unchanged if Eisen-
hower is elected.
"I want to see what he will do
as president," he added.
"He is very strong and will car-
ry the Midwest. I can't speak
about the West or the rest of the
nation."
Rhodes Awards
Extended for Vets
Under a new ruling, trustees of
the Rhodes Scholarship fund have
extended the age limit for veterans
of the Korean conflict.
A candidate who would other-
wise be over the 25-year-old age
limit, but who had had at least 90
days of active service in the U.S.
Armed Forces since June 27, 1950.
may deduct the period of his
service from his actual age if by
so doing he will qualify under the
regulations.
Any man elected as a Rhodes
Scholar who must go into the
armed forces will be allowed to
use the grant whenever he is free
to do so.

Japanese flower arrangements
will be the opening theme of the
three-week Japanese Festival,
with a display of rare and unusual
chrysanthemums beginning 3:30
p.m. tomorrow in the main lobby
of Alumni Memorial Hall.
A highlight of the three-day
flower show will be a demonstra-
tion on flower arranging 3:30 p.m.
tomorrow and Monday in Alumni
Memorial Hall. The demonstrator,
Mrs. Tomoko IKamamoto, is a
leading exponent of the art in
America.
The flower show will continue
with a speech by Mrs. Frank N.
Wood of Ann Arbor at 4:15 p.m.
Tuesday in Architecture Auditori-.
Tau Beta Pi
Adds Chapters
Tau Beta Pi, national engineer-
ing honor society, added two new
undergraduate chapters last week
at its 47th national convention,
held in Norman, Oklahoma.
The new chapters are at Fenn
College, Cleveland, Ohio, and Ohio
University, Athens, Ohio.
Frederick J. Kohlmeyer. '53
M.E., president of the local Gam-
ma chapter, represented the Uni-
versity.
Prof. A. D. Moore of the engi-
neering college presided over the
business meetings of the conven-
tion and also delivered a lecture
on fluid mapping.

um. Mrs. Wood will talk on "The
Traditions of Japanese Flower Ar-
rangements."
The Festival, something new to
the University campus, is being
presented during the next three
weeks as a good will gesture in re-
lation to the signing of the Japa-
nese peace treaty recently. Spon-
sors of the event are the Ann Ar-
bor Citizen's Flower Show, Uni-
versity Museum of Art, College of
Architecture and Design and the
Center for Japanese Studies.
Film To Continue
The SL-Cinema Guild will con-
tinue its showing of "Jenny La-
mour" tonight at the Architecture
Auditorium.
Winner of the international
grand prix, the movie stars Louis
Jouvet and Suzy Delair.
"Bashful Ballerina," starring
Imogene Coca, is also on the pro-
gram.

Rare Flower Display To Open
Japanese Festival Tomorrow

'Don Juan'
Extra Run
Scheduled
An extra performance of George
Bernard Shaw's "Don Juan in
Hell" will be presented here by the
Drama Quartet, the University
Oratorical Association announced
yesterday.
An unusually heavy demand for
tickets made it necessary to add a
performance, officials said.
Programs are now scheduled for
Nov. 5 and 6. The Nov. 6 program
is an extra lecture, not a part of
the regular lecture series.
Appearing in the program will
be Charles Boyer, Vincent Price,
Cedric Hardwicke and Agnes
Moorehead. Price replaced Charles
Laughton who has motion picture
commitments during November.
The quartet is presenting the
Shaw drama on a nation-wide
tour.
Tickets for the Nov. 6 produc-
tion will be on sale at the Hill Au-
ditorium box office, beginning 10
a.m. Tuesday.

I

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HOME STYLE EVENING MEALS
"Try our special sfeak sandwich"
HOMEMADE PIES and CAKES
Dinner 5:00-9:00 -- Lunch 11:00-2:00
Closed Mondays - Plenty of Free Parking Space
3452 WASHTENAW RD. TEL. 2-6838

4

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Student Radio Guild members;
a number of student announcers
and operators are employed; and
student talent is utilized in mu-
sical programs and some educa-
tional broadcasts.
Cooperation between the speech
department and broadcasting
units is also accomplished through
the necessity of sharing facilities.
In the process of converting the
former Dolph Funeral Home to an
expanded new TV studio, provision
is being made for seminar rooms
and student observational quar-

ters, according to TV 'production
supervisor Hazen Schumacher.
The upshot of the speech de-
partment-broadcasting unit re-
lationship is that) academic pro-
grams serve only as training
ground for professional station
work. With increased education-
al broadcasting on radio and TV,
a devolpment born of the aware-
ness that University instruction
should extend beyond its campus,
some broadcasting officials predict
that there will be a greater neces-
sity to draw on student material.

INTERNATIONAL IN SCOPE:
NSA Represents 750,000 Students .

Chest Drive
Nets $6,000
A total of $6,000 in donations
has been collected in the first three
days of the University Community
Chest Fund Drive.
The campaign has been divided
according to the different build-
ings on campus. North Hall was
the first building to turn in a re-
port of 100 per cent donations from
all its faculty members and cleri-
cal employees on the first day of
the campaign. Two other buildings
turned in reports of 100 per cent
donation the next day. They were
Clements Library and the Alumni
Catalog office, located in Alumni
Hall.
The emphasis this year, said
Mrs. C. James Idema, who is as-
sisting Prof. Robert S. Fox of the
School of Education with this
campaign, is not the amount of
the donation, but rather that each
faculty member and employee
make some donation. This year
the donations seem slightly above
those of last year's campaign.
The services of the Chest Fund
which benefit the faculty members
most are those which go to the
Perry Nursery school. Faculty chil-
dren compose a majority of the
children attending the Nursery
daily.
Sign up for Senior Pictures, 1
p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Deadline is Fri., Oct. 17.
- - - - - - -

Editor's note: This is the third in
a series of articles on the National
Student Association. Today's story
describes the organization and func-
tions of NSA.
. By HARRY LUNN
More than 250 student govern-
ments representing 750,000 stu-
dents are associated together in
the National Student Association.
Altogether, one fifth of the na-
tion's schools and colleges wtih
one third of the student popula-
tion have joined the only national
student organization since its
founding in 1946.
NSA ORIGINATED after 25
American student leaders attend-
ed a World Student Congress in
1946 at Prague and decided that a
similar organization should be
founded in this country. During
the latter months of 1946 they laid
the groundwork for the Associa-
tion, and the first national con-
gress was held the following sum-
mer.
The University Student Legis-
lature has been a member of
NSA since its inception.
NSA has two basic functions: it
works for the improvement of in-
dividual student governments and
represents American students on
the national and international
level.
School of Nursing
Enrollment Rises
Freshman enrollment in the
School of Nursing has increased
sharply since the announcement
of the school's new degree pro-
gram, Prof. Rhoda Reddig, nursing
school director, said yesterday.
Prof. Reddig reported that this
year- there are 151 freshman stu-
dents enrolled in the freshman
class, largest in the history of the
school. Total enrollment is 399.
She said that the high enroll-
ment figures were probably the re-
sult of the new curriculum offer-
ing a four year program leading
to a Bachelor of Science degree in
nursing which has replaced the;
five year program.
Pharmacy Talks
To CloseToday
Retail pharmacists start the
last day' of this year's College of
Pharmacy lectures with a meeting
today at 9:30 a.m. in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The annual lecture series opened
with a meeting yesterday after-
noon and a dinner meeting last
night.
I EUXY d'h1UEU' I

These two duties involve an in-
numerable series of projects on
the local, regional, national and
international levels. However, the
real potentialities of NSA have
been hampered by a lack of funds.
WHEN IT WAS first formed,
the organization had one presi-
dent and four vice-presidents,
each of whom received a salary.
In the last few years NSA has
not been able to afford a staff
of this size, so only the presi-
dent and one vice-president have
worked full time and received
salaries. The three other vice-
presidents served on a part-
time basis and remained in
school.
Over the protests of the Michi
gan region, the NSA Congress.this
summer added another paid vice-
president to the national staff.
The Michigan region and several
other groups felt the group could
not afford this additional'expense.
Ironically enough, the Congress
later elected former SL president
Leonard Wilcox, '52, to the paid
vice-presidential position. He will
receive a yearly salary of $2,000
for his full time work.
.* * *
ANNUAL DUES will net the or-
ganization an estimated $10,000 a
year. At present SL pays $150 of
this total as their share. Formally
the Legislature was required to
pay as much as $369 a year in
dues, but as more schools joined
the Association, per capita dues
were lowered.
Other revenues for the year
are estimated at around $3,000,
Orchestra To Give
Children's Concert
The Universit'y of Michigan
Symphony, under the direction of
Wayne Dunlap, will present a
"young people's" concert 3 p.m.
Wednesday, in Hill Auditorium.
School children of Ann Arbor
and vicinity. have been invited to
attend.
II.

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I I I 1111 1 W ill 11111 IN

but expenses will probably run
close to $19,000 leaving a deficit
of $6,000 which will be made
up from Congress fees and the
travel bureau.
In the past, NSA has had trquble
keeping within its budget, but this
year the national committee has
tried to set its financing on firm-
er footing.
SL vice-president Phil Berry,
Grad, worked on this project at
the Congress this summer. The
two main problems as Berry sees
them re keeping accurate books
and budgeting realistically.
In order to get enough money
to finance their future projects,
NSA is currently working to'get
grants from various charitable and
educational foundations in this
country.
Soph Cab Tryout
Schedule Changed
Soph Cab floorshow tryouts
which were originally schdduled
for Monday, Tuesday and Wednes-
day of next week will not be held
at that time.
Dance tryouts, instead, will be
held Mon. Oct. 20 7-9:30 p.m.,
Tues. Oct. 21, 7-9:30 p.m.and
Wed., Oct. 22, 7-9:30 p.m. Tryouts
for speaking and, singing parts
will be held Mon. Oct. 20 3-5 p.m.
7-9:30 p.m., Tues. Oct. 21 7-9:30
p.m. and Wed. Oct. 22 3-5 p.m. 7-
9:30 p.m. All tryouts will be held in
the League.
Barristers Elect
Students to Society
Fifteen law students were elect-
ed to the Barristers Society. The
students are: Joel Biller, Frank
Zagelmeyer, John Ryder, John
Hayward, Richard Barnett, War-
ren Urbom, John Lowry, Charles
Oldfather.
Also, James Gamble, Ward
Koehler, George Miller, Alan Kid-
ston, Fred Johnson, Richard Rohr
and Robert Beach.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Oct. 12-Are Sin, Disease, and Death Real?
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings from
7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30 to
4:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
9:45 A.M.: Student Bible Class: "Exodus."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship: "The New and the
Old."'
7:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild: (in the Chap-
man room) "The Basis of Authority and Reli-
gion" Prof. Wm. Frankena, Head of Dept. of
Philosophy.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday at 4:30: Open House after the Game. . .
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the Rev.
R. W. Hahn, D.D., of Chicago, Exec. Secy. of
the Student Service Commission.
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program (6:30), with -Dr.
Hahn as speaker.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw.Ave.
Rev. Henry J. Kuizenga, Minister
Rev. Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
Rev. Wm. S. Baker, Student Minister
Sunday Morning Service: 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
Dr. H. J. Kuizenga preaching.
"The Disenchanted."
Sunday 10:00 Student Bible Seminar.
6:30 Westminster Guild. Fireside Program by
Fellowship Committee.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mrs. W. S. Bicknell, Parish Assistant
Mr. E. J. Schuss, Student Advisor
Miss Jane Townsend, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group-Edward H.
Redman will discuss: "Financing a Building
P ragram."
Unitarian Church School.
11 A.M.: Service of Worship. Sermon: "For Hu-
m.anism and Against Atheism" by Edward H.
Redman.
6-8 P.M.: Junior AUY.
7:15 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group at Lane Hall
Upper Room. Prof. Mischa Titiev: "What Is
Religion?"
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Wi!liam and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8:00 A.M., 9'30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P M.
Newman Club Rooms in Basement of Chapel.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Students
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast at Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Henry Lewis.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
4:00 P.M.: Student Confirmation Class, Canter-
bury House.
5:15 P.M.: High School Club.
6:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club Meeting. "The
Church Sings" will be presented by Miss Ada
Ames and a group of members.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer, St. Michael's Chapel.
Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday (St. Luke) 7:00
A.M. Holy Communion followed by Student
Breakfast; Friday 13:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Phone 7622
Sunday-9:15 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
7:00 P.M.: LSA Meeting-Speaker, Prof. Preston
Slosson of the History Department.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M.: "Teachings of the Various
Denominations."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A M.: Discussion Class. Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: "The Jesus Who Frightens
Us." Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Professor John
'W. Reed will speak on "The Meaning of Chris-
tian Committment."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Sts.
Rev. George W. Barger, Minister
Sunday, October 12
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Our Expanding Christ."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
CONGREGATIONAL DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
Marilynn Williams, Associate Director
Wyn Price, Assistant
Tuesday Student Tea: 4:30-6:00 Guild House.
Sunday, Oct. 12, 7:00, Congregational Church.
Marilynn Williams speaking on "Christianity
and Politics."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.

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Ann Arbor Bank
State Street Office
330 South State
Ann Arbor

Main Teller

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
Waiter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
423 South Fourth Ave.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service Sermon: Your Fam-
ilv nn- Th-r m ilipsof a: + nrth_

'

C'['t' I Ir R1rNXA

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121

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