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October 08, 1952 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-08

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WEDNESDAY, OC BER $, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1952PAGE FIVE

Joint Men's Concert
Planned with Cornell

Annual I-Hop Scheduled for Saturday in League

0

As a feature of the Cornell
weekend, the University Men's
Glee Club will give a joint con-
cert with the Cornell Men's Glee
Club at 8:30 p.m. Saturday, No-
vember 8, in Hill Auditorium.
This is the second year the two
musical groups have joined forces.
Last year the concert was pre-
sented to an audience at Ithaca,
New York, where the Michigan-
Cornell game was played.
RESERVED SEAT tickets will
be sold in the price ranges of
$2.20, $1.50 and 90c..
2 The University Men's Glee
Hillel Holds
Registration
For Courses
Registration for classes in per-
sonal adjustment, Hebrew, basic
Judaism and the psychology of
religion will take place between 7
and 9:30 p.m. tonight at the Hillel
building, 1429 Hill Street.
Courses are free to all members
of Hillel, but there will be a2
4 charge for those who are At
members. This is the samq price
as a membership.
The times and days classes will
meet will be announced after re-
4 gistration. Each course will be
scheduled at times convenient to
the majority of students registered
for it.
Purposes of the course in per-
sonal adjustment are to explore
one's self and to strive for great-
er maturity, to discuss common
problems and solutions for the
young adult, and to aid in clarify-
ing personal and social values. The
project will be presented in great-
er detail at 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.
tomorrow at Hillel by Professor
r Hutt.
Classes in Hebrew will be con-
ducted for beginners and advanced
students. The class for advanced
students will be in conversational
Hebrew and will be conducted by
an Israeli student.

Club is the oldest musical or-
ganization on the campus, with
a 94-year background dating
back to 1859.
The Glee Club has appeared in
concerts from New York City to
Portland, Oregon. In addition to
its concert tours, the organization
has performed for the media of
radio, television,, recordings and
motion pictures.
* -.* *
LAST FEBRUARY a movie short
entitled "Songs of the Campus"
was released, and featured tradi-
tional songs sung by the Glee Club.
The Men's Glee Club is a
student managed, self-perpetu-
ating organization. The officers
and members are responsible for
the managing of personal ap-
pearance tours throughout the "
state and country, as well as
the arrangements for the club's
many other activities.
Last year the club made ten
out-of-town trips, travelling 4,500
miles, and presented over 30 con-
certs. The high point of the sea-
son was a 2,000 mile eastern tour
which included concerts in such
cities as New York, Philadelphia,
Washington, Pittsburgh and Cleve-
land.
* * *
DAVID CALAHAN, '53, newly
appointed senior manager of the
Glee Club, has announced the
plans for the 1952-53 season. In
addition to the Michigan-Cornell
concert an ,extensive concert tour
between semesters in February is
planned. This will take the club to
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Louis,
Memphis and other midwestern
cities.
Europe is the goal for a club
tour in the near future, possibly
next summer, stated Merle Nelson,
retiring manager.
Since 1947 the Men's Glee Club
has been directed by Philip Duey,
professor of voice in the School of
Music. Before taking over this po-
sition Mr. Duey had followed a
career as a professional singer.
Last spring he was a soloist in
the May Festival, along with a
number of stars of the Metropoli-
tan Opera.

-Daily-Lary Wilk
POSTERS PRODUCED-Members of the committee plan posters
for the League Fall Dance, which will be presented from 9 to 12
p.m. Saturday, October 18, in the League Ballroom. Bill Kline and
his orchestra will provide the music for the annual girl-bid affair.
The theme of the dance will be "Pink Lemonade."
*. * * *
'PINK LEMONADE':
League Plans Underway
For Annual Girl-Bid Dance

"Pink Lemonade" will be the
theme of the annual League Fall
Dance to be held from 9 to 12!
p.m. Saturday, October 18 in the
League Ballroom.
Lavender, yellow and blue horses
will prance gaily on a pink and
white carousel in the center of the
ballroom.
IN THE CORNERS of the room
will be bright balloon trees carry-
ing out the pastel, carnival-like
atmosphere.
Decorating the bandstand will
be pink and white scallops and
two huge glasses of pink lemon-
ade with giant straws sticking
out the tops.
Bill Kline and his orchestra will
provide the music for the annualj
girl-bid event.

THIS YEAR, as before, gift cer-
tificates will be given to the
houses selling the most tickets to
the dance in proportion to the
number of girls living there.
Last year's dance set an Ori-
ental mood with an Arabian
genie holding a silver sword
guarding the entrance.
The theme, "One Night In 1000,"
was further carried out by Arabian
figures and scenes from the Arabi-
placed on either side of the band-
an Nights, depicted on murals and
stand.
* * *
DECORATIONS also included
an Arabian tent to house the fez-
wearing bandmen.
The programs for the dance
featured a red cellophane cover
with an Arabian lamp on it.
At the previous year's dance a
Halloween theme was carried out
by bats, witches, ghosts and jack-
o-lanterns.
Last year $10 and $5 gift cer-
tificates were awarded to the
houses selling the most tickets to
the dance.
Merit-Tutorial
There will be a mass meeting
for all coeds interested in work-
ing in the League Merit-Tutor-
ial office at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the League Undergraduate
Office. Coeds interested in gain-
ing experience in League activi-
ties by working in the office
may attend this meeting.

Annual I-Hop, presented by the
independent men and women and
open to the entire campus, will
take place from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.-
Saturday on the second floor of
the League.
Tickets are being sold at $2.50
per couple in Angell Hall, the
League and in the men's resi-
dences. They will also be available
at the door.
* * *
THE DANCE has been informal
and it has been requested that
women attending the dance do not
wear corsages. Women students
will be given late permission until
1:30 a.m. for the dance.
Don Bari and his orchestra
from Detroit will play for the
1952 I-Hop. His band has been
featured throughout the state
and has appeared on campus
twice last year.
His orchestra specializes in the
type of arrangements that please
most dancers. A variety of current
popular hits and old favorites will
round out the evening of dance-
able music.
PAUL McDonough and his com-
bo will also add to the musical va-
riety of the evening. He has played
for a number of campus dances
last year.
By having two bands, the
committee hopes everyone's
taste in dance music will be
satisfied.
Square Dancers
To Hold Meeting
To Organize Club
Square dance enthusiasts will
answer the call of "swing your
partner" at the organizational
meeting of the Folk and Square
Dance Club to be held at 7:30 p.m.
today in the WAB.
Sponsored by the Women's Ath-
letic Association, the club wel-
comes all students, beginning as
well as experienced square dancers.
Both men and women are in-
vited to join the club, one of the
eight WAA co-recreational organ-
izations.
The Folk and Square Dance club
meets every Wednesday during the
year.
Instructions will be offered in
many dances, including f o 1 k,
square, reel and round dances.
Invitations have been sent out
to members of other clubs and
campus groups to attend the meet-
ings of the club.
In past years the Folk and
Square Dance Club has sponsored
various activities, including a Hal-
loween party and entertaining at
open houses at the Intramural
Building.
This year the club, with Allen
Van Liere as manager, will parti-
cipate in these and other enter-
tainment programs.
During Orientation Week, the
group presented a square dance in
the parking lot between the Na-
tural Science and Chemistry
Buildings. Transfer students were
especially invited, but the large
group attending included fresh-
men and orientation leaders.

I-Hop, whose theme is Blue Ho-
rizon, will be presented the night
of the Michigan-Indiana football
game, and an invitation will be is-
sued to guests from the University
of Indiana.

PROCEEDS from the
traditionally given to a
organization.
In 1950 they went

Phoenix Project and last year
they were given to the Universi-
ty's Fresh Air Camp, which pro-
vides camping experience for
underprivileged children.

THE FORMAL OP
L of
TONIGHT
7-9
To view the new lines the new colors-t
our lovely fall collections of clothes by foremo
Come in with all your friends and make this a ga
be informal modeling of our new fall f ashio
throughout the evening.
We're looking forward with BOO

ENING
NEW LOCATION
South Forest
off S. Univ.
he new smartness of
st fashion designers.
la occasion! There'll
ns and door prizes
R PRIZES

dance are
charitable
to the

Decorations will be modernistic,
and feature artistic "mobiles," a
space modulator, and various ef-
fects with lighting.
BEHIND the bandstand in the
ballroom yarn stretched on a
wooden rrame will represent lines
reaching to infinity. The band will
be silhouetted against a luminous
moon in front of the dark blue
background.
These same effects will be pro-
duced on a smaller scale in the
Hussey Room, where Paul McDon-
ough's combo will play.

In the Michigan Room a lighted
pool with bubbles floating up and
down in the water will dominate
the scene. Tropical fish will com-
plete the atmosphere of a tropi-
cal climate.
A fountain with mist produced
by dry ice will fill the center of
the concourse, and foliage, and
park benches will be placed around
the fountain.
Last year the theme was Kick-
Off and featured scenes familiar to
students on the day of the big
game.

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pleasure to your visit. 1. A "Mynette
2. A "Sacony"
DON'T miss our 3. A "Luxite'
CELEBRATION! 4. A box of P-
-- 5. A beautiful
6. A "Koret"
PARKING SPACE pleet ski
at rear of building 7. HolIy craft
jewelry

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blouse
slip
ioenix hosiery
silk sarf'
Tub-i-nyl perma
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and Lothar Davids f

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ant a ate?
There's a real deal cooking for November 8! . . . the Cor-
nell-Michigan football game in the afternoon and a sensa-
tional performance in the evening! The Cornell Men's Glee
Club is going to sing in a combined concert with the U. of M.
Men's Glee Club at Hill Auditorium at 8:30 P.M. It will be
a terrific week-end, and will be climaxed by a tremendous
concert on Saturday night. To assure a good seat get your
ticket right away. Use the convenient order blank below:
CORNELL-MICHIGAN GLEE CLUB CONCERT
Ticket Order Blank -- I
! 1
j University of Michigan Men's Glee Club j
j 4020 Administration Building
IAnn Arbor, Michigan
j Enclosed $ --.. in payment for ___ _ tickets as follows: j
I j
j ___at $2.20, Block A (Three central sections of main floor, and first
eight rows of three central sections of first balcony.)
at $1.50, Block B (Two side sections of main floor and first bal-
cony, and last seven rows of three central sections of j
j first balcony.)
I 1

4
411

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THE SUEDE LEATHER JACKET
a cajal wit a distinctive manner
Top tailoring and rich suede combine in a jacket that belts
close or is worn straight and boxy like a shirt. Water-

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