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October 08, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

six

THEr MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1952

FORMER DETECTIVE:
HeuselBegins Security Officer Job
The former veteran police detec-
tive took a copy of a map used to 4U:;;.$.:. :.
guide freshmen around campus out'
of his new drawer and studied it ?
building by building.>
"This is what I'm chiefly con-
cerned with," he pointed out.
Retired detective captain of the
Ann Arbor Police Force Albert
Heusel has become thoroughly ac-
quainted with every campus build-
ing from Angell Hall to TCB since
he was hired by the University Au-
gust 1 to fill the newly-created
post of plant department security
officer.
SINCE his appointment, Heusel
has found his main job to be su-
pervising the University's 18-man .,:.:
night-watchman force and learn- :
in'g the vast system of buildings.
and equipment his force patrols.
Heading night watchmen not=
only means checking on his '::
force's after-dark rounds, Heu-
sel explained. One of his more
inglorious jobs has been to build
up a sort of educational program
to urge building occupants to
close windows and doors at l
night.

Art Festival

I

Th'e

Nominee's

T o Be Held
Next Week
As a gesture of good will with
reference to the recent signing of
the Japanese peace treaty, a three-
week Japanese festival will be held
at the University beginning Sun-
day.
Joint sponsors of the festival are
the University Museum of Art, Col-
lege of Architecture and Design,
Center for Japanese Studies, and
the Ann Arbor Citizens Flower
Show.
OPENING the unique festival
will be a three-day show of rare
and unusual chrysanthemums to
be displayed at 3:30 p.m. Sunday
in the main lobby of Alumni Me-
morial Hall.
Two demonstrations of Japa-
nese flower arrangement by Mrs.
Tomoko Yamanoto, leading ex-
ponent of the art in America,
will be the special feature of the
flower show.
Mrs. Frank N. Wood of Ann Ar-
bor will speak on "The Traditions
of Japanese Flower Arrangement"
at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium.
Prof. James N. Plummer of the
fine arts department will continue
the festival when he speaks on
Japanese sculpture at 4:15 p.m.
Thursday in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
The highlight of the festival will
be the presentation of Japanese
flowering cherry trees by His Ex-
cellency Eikichi Araki, Japanese
ambassador at 3:30 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 19.

Life -A Local

Try ng
Swizple

S
r 1 1
{i
X 1
11111

"

t
A

Heusef's 28 years of experience
with the local police delartment
won't be wasted in his new job.
Filling a post' created to "improve
security relations covering Univer-
sity property in Ann Arbor," Heus-
el will be working as the chief con-
tact man between local police and
the University. ,#
His contact work has so far ex-
Vanded no further than informing
police of illegally parked cars, con-
gestion at loading docks and cam-

--University Photo Nservice
ALBERT HEUSEL, NEW 'U' OFFICIAL

* * * 4
pus thefts. But Heusel's position
is the first at the University to cen-
tralize in one person responsibility'
for maintaining close contact with
the Ann Arbor police.
* * *As
ACOORDING to University vice-

* * ,*
president Wilbur K. Pierpont, the
creation of Heusel's position is a
"phase of a cooperative plan to
improve police protection of Uni-
versity property," made increas-
ingly necessary by expansion of
campus buildings and grounds.

i.

THE NEXT GENERATION PEERS INTENTLY AT "THEIR MAN" FOR THE NEXT PRESiDENT

Overstreet Says 'U.S. Culture,
Conununication Now Adequate'

Our culture and communication
mediums are adequately meeting
their responsibility of helping the
American people to become more
mature, H. A. Oversteet, famed
author-psychologist said yester-
- day.
Overstreet, author of the best
selling book, "The Mature Mind,"
plus other books on personal phi-
losophy and psychology, said that
television, radio and the newspa-
pers accomplish this because they
bring people closer together.
* * *
"TELEVISION is doing the re-
NV1SA Efforts'
To Cooperate
With IUS Fail
(Continued from Page 1)
Further projects were devel-
oped on the regional and nation-
al levels The New England re-
gion inaugerated a conference
on American foreign, policy
which brought a large number
of outstanding speakers togeth-
er to discuss a wide range of
foreign policy topics.
Opened to the public with great
success, the conference. will prob-
ably become one of the major cul-
tural activities of the New England
region.
The Michigan region handled
planning for Indian Student
Scholarships last year, but later
the project was extended to sever-
al other areas. Through this plan,
a number of advanced Indian stu-
dents will be able to do technical
work in this country.
Other regional and national
programs included book ex-
changes with Latin American
universities, Cuban student tours
and attendance at various stu-
dent conferences.
NSA is presently making ar-
rangements with the State Re-
partment to have its representa-
tives recognized as official dele-
. gates to international conferences
to which American student repre-
sentatives are invited.

markable by bringing the individ-
ual face to face with other indi-
viduals who are completely out of
range of his seeing," he said.
Through this, the writer-lecturer
explained, the audience learns
about many people in terms of
their personal qualities, thus be-
coming more sensitive in judging
personalities.
"It doesn't matter whether
whether programs are good or
bad," Overstreet asserted. "The
important thing is that they ex-
tend the range of our knowl-
edge."
Commenting on the role of the
press, he cited three things on
which newspapers should concen-
trate:
First is to insist on complete ac-
curacy in news reporting, present-
ing a "clear picture" of the situa-
tion.
Each paper should also turn its
editorial columns into a "kind of
daily town meeting"-to make an
effort to present informed discus-
sion of issues, Overstreet empha-
sized. One of the most important
developments of modern journal-
ism has been the introduction of
the columnist, he noted.
The third thing which the press
should emphasize, he said, is "to
represent steadily and consistent-
ly a point of view."
Registration
For jobs Set
University seniors and graduate
students interested in employment
after graduation can register Oct.
13 and 14 in the Rackham Lecture
Hall during the annual placement
meeting of the Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Informa-
tion.
Those interested in administra-
tive and teaching positions on ele-
mentary, secondary and college
levels may register at 4 p.m. Oct.
13.
Applicants for general, business,
government and technical posi-
tions should register at 4 p.m.,
Oct. 14.

Open Letter to Students' Wives
Michigan Bell Welcomes You
to Ann Arbor
If you are a former telephone operator and would
like to work while your husband attends school, come
in and see us. Every girl with previous telephone
experience is still a "telephone woman" to us, and
we can offer immediate employment to those who
are qualified.
Inquire at:
Michigan Bell telephone Co.
323 East Washington
Only 21 blocks from campus
- m

k

A
DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Pictures by
DON CAMPBELL

I'

STEVENSON ENDS ANOTHER PLANE RIDE, BEGINS ANOTHER STOP-OFF TOUR

SPECIAL CLASSES
offered by
HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
3-4129

k

REGISTRATION:

Except when otherwise indicated

II .1

Wed., Oct. 8... .7 to 9:30 P.M.
1. GROUPS FOR PERSONAL
ADJUSTMENT
Conducted by Prof. Max Hutt & Dr. M. Gurin
PURPOSE: A. An opportunity to explore one's
self and to strive for greater maturity.
B. A discussion of common problems and solu-
tions for the young adult.
C. Aid in clarifying personal and social goals.
PROJECT will be presented in greater detail on
Thurs., Oct. 9 at 12:30 P.M. and also at 1:30
P.M. at Hillel by Prof. Hutt.
2. ELEMENTARY HEBREW
For Beginners.
3. CONVERSATIONAL HEBREW
For advanced students.
Conducted by an Israeli.
4. BASIC JUDAISM
A course in the customs, religious practices and
history of the Jewish people. Rabbi Lymon.
5. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF
RELIGION

1

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CASHMERE BLEND
WITH FINEST AUSTRALIAN WOOL
AND MOHAIR

FINAL PREPARATION FOR...

... ONE OF THE DAY'S MANY SPEECHES

NAVY
and
PALE GREEN

$ 795
WORTH
MUCH
MORE

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1 ('fl/.WOLf

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