100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 26, 1953 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE VE

_

Bunyan Reported Camping in Arb

'U' Foresters
Plan Dance
F For Saturday
There was a mass exodus from
campus today as the word got
around that Paul Bunyan has
set up a temporary winter camp
in the Arboretum.
Foresters confirmed the report
and say that Paul is occupying a
specially-made shack that has
been constructed for him on the
banks of the Huron River.
THE ARB closely resembles
Paul's legendary home in the Land
of the Big Trees, although quarters
are a little cramped for the colos-
sal lumberman.
The Huron River does not quite
measure up to Niagara Falls which
Paul uses as a shower-bath, but
members of the Forestry Club are
! trying their best to make him com-
fortable.
He will appear on campus from
.p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday to at-
tend the annual all-campus Paul
Bunyan dance given in his honor
at Barbour-Waterman Gymnasi-
um by the Forestry Club.
Members of the natural re-
sources school remember oth-
er visitssbythe giant lumber-
jack, and will spin a tale for
hours about his antics.
One forester tells about the
time a student had thedhonor of
escorting Paul to the dance. He
forgot to plan his route before-
hand and came by way of the en-
gine arch.
Paul, being a good sport and not
wanting to embarrass his host, at-
tempted to go through, but got
stuck in' the middle.
STUDENT
SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
REPAIRED
RENTED
' SOLD
BOUGHT
Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago
Tape and Wire Recorders
MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
IN PERSON-Paul Bunyan has arrived in Ann Arbor in time to
attend the Paul Bunyan Dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday
in Barbour-Waterman Gymnasium. Paul dwarfs Burton Memorial
Tower but is finding his quarters in the Arb fairly comfortable.,

Annual Ball
To Be Given
By Assembly
Coeds Choose Escorts
To Visit Exotic Land
Of The Wizard of Oz
In 44 B.C. Calpurnia told Cae-
sar to beware the Ides of March;
today a new warning "Be aware of
March 7," is being directed at Uni-
versity women by members of the
Assembly Ball committee.
Having the welfare of the indi-
vidual coed in mind, members
point out the evil that befell Cae-
sar when he ignored his warning
in a hope that University coeds
will not make the same mistake.
The mystery behind the Assem-
bly warning has finally been re-
vealed.
Coeds now have the opportuni-
ty to ask the man of their
choice to a major social function,
the annual Assembly Ball to be
presented from 9 to 1 a.m. Satur-
day, March 7, on the entire sec-
ond floor of the League
This dance will provide coeds
with a.chance to go out with that
shy boy in "Poli. Sci." or to pay
back someone for his J-Hop or
Paul Bunyan dance bid.
Although traveling cuts heavily
into the pocketbooks these days,
students may journey to the "land
of Emerald Enchantment" and dis-
cover the many wonders of this
unique empire simply by purchas-
ing a ticket to the dance.
For the $2.50 admission price
couples will receive a green key
in the form of a program which
will allow them to follow the yellow
brick wall and meet many of their
old friends from the land of Oz.
Direct from the pages of Frank
Baum's famous book, "The Wiz-
ard of Oz," the tin woodsman,
scarecrow and cowardly lion will
be prepared to greet all partygo-
ers in the ballroom.
Tourists will also have an op-
portunity to renew old acquaint-
ances from Ann Arbor, as Paul
McDounough and his orchestra
will be on hand to play danceable
American tunes.
From not too far off strains of
Dixieland music in the style of
the Ann Arbor Alleycats will be
detected.
Familiar faces will also make
their appearance as members of
this year's Union Opera cast per-
form during intermission.
Tickets for this semi-formal
dance may be purchased from rep-
resentatives situated in all the
women's residence halls and at the
League beginning Monday.
Paul Bunyan
There will be a meeting of the
members of the natural re-
sources school at 7:30 p.m. to-
night in 2082 Natural Science.
Final plans will be discussed
for the Paul Bunyan dance.
Dates and wives of members
are invited to attend.

Fred Waring will return to the
town where he began his career
when he arrives in Ann Arbor for
concerts to be held at 7 and 9:30
p.m. Saturday, March 14, in Hill
Auditorium.
Mail orders for the performance
are now being accepted at 1020
Administration Building. Ticket
prices are $2.40, $1.80 and $1.20.
ACCOMPANYING Fred Waring
will be the complete cast of his

-

were an immediate hit with the
students, according to Mr. Hoag,
with their theme song "Sleep."
They played it as a final number
for their performance instead of
ending with the loud jazzy num-
bers usually played.
* * *
MR. HOAG considers Waring
"a grand guy-the type that never
forgets a friend" and says, "He's
as quiet and reserved today as he
was then-even though he has be-
come so successful."
Waring has always had a soft
spot in his heart for the Univer-
sity. His first Hollywood film
"Varsity Show" was based on the
University and had a theme of
Michigan memories.
From Ann Arbor, the Waring
troupe went to Detroit for a two
week stand at a movie theatre.
From there they gradually worked
their way up to the Roxy Theatre
in New York and a European tour.
THIS TOUR of the Pennsylvan-
ians will be theirsfirst coast-to-
coast concert tour since 1937. They
will visit 58 cities in 24 states cov-
ering 17,000 miles by plane, train
and bus.
The cast of the show con-
sists of 60 performers, including
the glee club, orchestra and the
individual soloists.
In making such an extended con-
cert tour, Waring is fulfilling a
long-standing desire to travel
widely. It is his conviction that in
personal contact with his audi-
ences during such concerts all the
warmth and geniality of showman-
ship is exposed.
** *
IN RECENT YEARS the Waring
name has become associated with
choral work and he has held chor-
al workshops in which he has
shared his techniques with direc-
tors from across the nation.

The Pennsylvanians had to
audition 32 times for their first
radio job, since sponsors didn't
feel that choir singing would be
successful on an evening radio
spot.
It was for his first break on ra-
dio that Waring devised the char-
acteristics that have since become
his musical trade-mark - long
hums, sudden changes of volume
and tempo on hymns and jazz
tunes alike and uxusual phrasing.
THE WARING concert will fea-
ture several soloists, including Po-
ley McClintock, who was one of
the original members of Waring's
first band. Poley presides over the
drums in the orchestra.

Also to be in the spotlight are
Keith and Sylvia Textor, who
offer duets in close harmony,
and Virginia Morley and Liv-
ingston Gearhart, another team
who are featured as duo-pianists.
"The girl with the bangs," Joyce
DeYoung, has become well-known
through the Waring television
show. She is a featured contralto
with the Pennsylvanians.
Tom Waring, Fred's brother, was
also an original member of the
first Pennsylvanians and played
the piano with the orchestra until
recently when he retired because
of ill health.
He now writes and arranges mu-
sic for the glee club and orches-
tra.

THE REPORT has lost a lot in
the telling, they say, but it took
24 foresters and a Model T to get
him the rest of the way through.
All lumbermen like to tell how
Paul is supposed to have formed
Pikes Peak when he piled rocks
around his pike pole.
The Mississippi River, they ex-
plain, was formed when one of
Paul's water wagons sprang a leak.
One day when Paul was feeling
particularly sad, his tears formed
the Great Salt Lake.
~ *.*
THE GRIDDLE on which his
cooks made the pancakes for his
breakfast was so big that they had
to tie slabs of bacon on their feet
and skate around to grease it.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

It was half a mile long and too
wide to see across.
Paul started on his way to Ann
Arbor early last week, foresters
report. They first learned he was
on his way when several large
footprints were discovered, and
three University professors were
dispatched to determine the truth
of the tale.
Seismographic stations out West
recorded land tremors, and final-
ly a report came from Moose, Wy-
oming, that two small boys had
looked out their window early one
morning and had seen his huge
figure receding in the distance.
* * *
FORESTERS HERE say they
knew all the time that Paul was
on his way to Ann Arbor, and that
all this alarm was only because no
one would believe them.
Meanwhile, as the campus was
getting ready for the eventful
weekend axes appeared on trees
and people began wearing blue
jeans and plaid shirts to class.
The Forestry Club declared this
week "Plaid Shirt Week" and all
natural resource students are to
wear this costume only.
The report has come in that the
new costume is so popular it has
been adopted by "Lit School" stu-
dents, who gladly discarded their
suits and silk ties for the time be-
ing.
Official garb for the dance will
be plaid shirts and blue jeans, for
the women as well as men.

Fred Waring, TV Cast To Perform at Hill;
Men's Glee Club, Panhel To Sponsor Show

FRED WARING
television show, more popularly
known as the Pennsylvanians.
Waring's first professional
performance was given at the
University for J-Hop in 1922,
His band was hired as a "sec-
ond" band to support a name
band employed for the dance.
The band consisted of 10 men
who had gained their previous ex-
perience by playing at fraternity
parties at Pennsylvania State Col-
lege.
* * *
GERALD HOAG, who was and
still is the manager of a local
movie theatre came to the J-Hop
to take movies. It was the custom
then to show movies of campus
happenings in the local theatres.
He was impressed with the
unique rhythm of the band and
signed them up for a one week
stand at the Majestic Theatre
on Maynard St. in Ann Arbor.
Waring and his Pennsylvanians

We're on our
way to
ZIEGLER'S
for the Best
Sandwiches in town
Come along
and see for yourself
C

, ?
.5 0
-0f
..
.a
. .,
j
: !
r \\
\y 7
ff
®' , (
" "}
; _ /
L e / ,.+

I

IcPI'44 Capo~.

ZI E GL ER'S elejtau an
120 W. Liberty
You must be 21 to drink.

IZFA

Seminar

1-11

Consult with your Balfour manr for his Story on
Diamonds . . . We offer a complete selection of
top quality Wedding and Engagement rings at
very low prices . . . Every customer assured of
personal service and The BALFOUR Guarantee
of quality on every purchase. -
L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY
1321 South University-Ann Arbor, Michigan
"Home of the Official Michigan Rings"

I

0* for all your

Phone 3-1733

BOB CARLSON, Manager

To BeginFriday
The Central States Regional
Seminar of IZFA will take place
from Friday night through Sun-
day at the Hillel building, 1429
Hill St.
The first session will begineat
7:45 p.m. Friday night with serv-
ices and a discussion by Prof. G.
E. Mendenhall, of the department
of Near East Studies, on "Ancient
Israel-Historic Approach to the
Modern State."
Following services, there will be
Israeli singing and dancing.
Services will be held Saturday
at 9 a.m. Following them Sherm
Leiber, IZFA National President
will speak. At 1:30 p.m. there will
be a discussion of the problems of
contemporary Israel.
Prof. N. M. Efimenco, of the de-
partment of political science, will
discuss the political aspects of
modern Israel; Prof. William Ha-
ber, of the economics department,
will speak on the economics situ-
ation in Israel; and Dr. M. L. Hutt,
of the psychology department will
discuss the psychological factors
affecting the integration of new
immigrants. A question period will
follow.
At 9 p.m. Saturday night there
will be social dancing and a show-
ing of the film, "House on the
Hill."
At a brunch on Sunday, chapter
reports will be read and regional
officers elected.
All sessions are open to the pub-
lic.

COFFEE HOUR - Hillel will
sponsor the weekly SRA Cof-
fee hour at 4 p.m. Friday at Lane
Hall.
* * *
SPRING WEEKEND - There
will be a meeting of the Spring
Weekend central committee at 7
p.m. tonight in Rm. 3D of the
Union. All members are requested
to attend.
, INTERNATIONAL CENTER -
There will be a tea from 4:30 to
6 p.m. today in the International
Center for foreign students and
America nfriends. As special guest
will- be Tula, Mexican Indian danc-
er. Everyone is invited to attend.
SCROLL SCHOLARSHIP - Ap-
plications for the annual Scroll
scholarship are available in the
Undergraduate Office of the
League.
Any affiliated junior woman is
eligible for the $100 scholarship,
which is awarded on basis of
leadership, character, service and
need. Funds for the scholarship
were raised by selling subscrip-
tions to the "Michigan Alumnus."
Interested women should return
their applications by Monday to
the Undergraduate Office and
should sign up for an interview at
that time.
Interviews will take place from
3:30 to 5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday
and from 7:30 to 9p.m. Wednesday
night at the League.
I ' ,e

MARCH 4-5
MARCH 4-5
MARCH 5-6
MARCH 9-10

Shell representatives
will visit your school

4M

as follows-

Shell Oil Co.-Manufacturing
(Refining)
Shell Chemical Corporation -
(Manufacturing & Marketing)(
Shell Oil Co.-Production De-
partment (Oil Field ProductionY
Shell Research and Development

PRINTING NEEDS

/
e^'. raM
. .
~
" :

S. FOREST
Just off
S. U.

" Programs
" Tickets

FOR INTERVIEWS WITH STUDENTS
RECEIVING DEGREES
IN THE FOLLOWING FIELDS --
Chemistry - Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial,
Mechanical and Metallurgical Engineering - Physics.

9 Posters

I
I
5 -

11

Ramsay Printers, Inc.

. "..

Ia Ca'4a

119 East Liberty St.

Phone 7900

1

I

I

i1-.

I'-

SN
OFFICES
We are receiving, urgent calls
from employers for business-
trained young men and young
women to fill positions such as
these:

11

for the best
SPAGHETTI
and RAVIOLI
in town.
Ia Cafja
122 W. Washington
BEER 9 WINE SANDWICHES

CHEMISTS, PLEASE SEE
DR. L. C. ANDERSON, AND
ENGINEERS AND PHYSICISTS SEE
MISS POST IN DEAN BROWN'S
OFFICE FOR APPOINTMENTS
AND FURTHER DETAILS.
You Can Obtain a Copy of
Our Booklet, "Opportunity
With Shell" at Either Office.

SIHEl

We Have Everything
in the way of career opportunities

-

I

I

TOWt

the 4-season
dressmaker

Hours: Mon.
Noon - 5:30
Tues. thru
Sat.
9:30-5:30

We will continue our additional training throughout March
in preparation for our summer business. If you are interested
in work that is interesting, pleasant, and profitable, investi-
gate immediately in the passibility of a position for you!
For those of you who have had PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE,
did you know that Michigan Bell will give you a liberal in-

ST EN OGRAPH ER
BOOKKEEPER
OFFICE MACHINE OPERATOR
ACCOUNTANT
SECRETARY
Starting salaries range up to
$250 per month. Many posi-
tions offer excellent opportuni-
ties for rapid advancement;
most offer a 40-hour week, paid
vacations,. pleasant. working
conditions,
YOU CAN QUALIFY QUICKLY

ENSIAN PRICE RISE
Tomorrow -Friday, Feb. 27th
From $5 to $6

I

(Nj- * }1

it

111i1 I

I

I

I

I

4 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan