100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 26, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


4

V

PAGE SX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1953

A

__________________________________________________________I_________________________________-____-_____--___

NOVEL THESIS:
Stage Crew Stars in Movie

By PAT ROELOFS
"Lights, camera, action!"
With this command, Charles
Hoefler, Grad., focused his 16 mm.
camera on the partially finished
stage setting in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
THE USUALLY unsung heroes
Tofa dramatic production, better
known as the crew, were stars of
the movie entitled "Design, Con-
struction, Assembly and Shifting
of the Stage Scenery for Faust."
They were working on the
scenery for the forthcoming pro-
duction of Gounod's opera,
"Faust" which will open at 8
p.m. Friday and play Saturday
and Monday through Wednes-
day nights in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
The impressive title, and the
movie, show a development of a}
particular set from the time the
idea was conceived by the scene
designer, until its application on
the stage.
This film will be the first of its
kind recording one complete dra-
matic production from beginning
to end, and is going to be sub-
mitted later this month as Hoef-r
ler's master's thesis in speech.
1ers m * * *
THE IDEA of using a moving
picture for a thesis has a definite
purpose according to Hoefler. He
plans to use the finished film as
a teaching device. He further feels
that the film will be a valuable
reference for the University con-
cerning the production of "Faust."
The silent film, in black and
white, wilt run about 25 min-
utes. Estimated cost of the en-
tire thesis project is $70, Hoef-
ler reported.
The movie will show construc-
tion of "Faust" sets, which include
Faust's study, a tavern, church,
prison and garden scenes. A "plug"
set, designed by Jack Bender, play
production art director, accom-
modates the rapid changes neces-
sary in the opera.
Three basic arches are used for
the entire show, with flown props
and backdrops filling in to alter
the scenes. A special technical re-
hersal is being held in order to
perfect the timing in scene chang-
ing.
Hoefler believes that he is the
+ first person to make a movie for
a thesis, but feels that film tech-
niques should be used more often
in the speech department, not only
in filming future productions, but
also in public speaking courses.
SL Lectures
To Be Opened
By Connable
(Continued from Page 1)
While on campus as a student,
Regent Connable was, in addition
to being a Daily night editor and
president of the Student Council,
a participant in the Men's Glee
Club and Union Opera. He be-
longed to Sphinx and Michigamua
and was affiliated with Delta Kap-
pa Epsilon.
On The Daily, Regent Con-
nable, considered a logical con-
tender for the top spot, was sur-
prised by a dark horse, Phil
Wagner, now Editor of the Bal-
timore Sun. He turned down an
appointment as Editorial Direc-
tor to accept the Student Coun-
cil position.
Regent Connable received an
MBA at Harvard in 1927. He is
past president of the Association
of Governing Boards of State Uni-
versities and Allied Institutions, an

important forum for exchange of
ideas and information among state
universities.
In addition, he served a wartime
stint as state OPA director.

Editor To Talk
About Religion,
Communism
Barbara Ward Jackson, assist-
ant editor of "The London Econo-
mist," will deliver two lectures on
the religious implications of the
Communist challenge to the free
world at 8 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday, Mar. 3 and 5, in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Tuesday's topic will be "Are To-
day's Problems Religious?" and
the subject of Thursday's lecture
is "Moral Order in an Uncertain
World."
MRS. JACKSON, a noted eco-
nomic authority, is the author of
several books, among them "The
West at Bay" and "Policy for the
West."
Mrs. Jackson has built up a
large following in her American
audience through contributing
articles to various national maga-
zines.
Sponsored by the Mott Founda-
tion, Mrs. Jackson's talks will in-
augurate a series of lectures de-
signed to bring outstanding per-
sonalities to the University each
year for a week's visit.
Under the sponsorship of the
economics club Mrs. Jackson will
speak on "Problems of Investment
in Underdeveloped Areas," at 8
p.m. Wednesday at the Rackham
Amphitheater.

Children's Clinic

LINGUISTICS CLUB:
Kiddle Explains Conflict
In Spanish Verb Form

4

Prof. Lawrence B. Kiddle of the
Spanish Department discussed the
use of 'vos' as opposed to 'tu' in the
formation of the Spanish verb last
night before the Linguistics Club.
Used in parts of South and Cen-
tral America in the formation of
Set Radcliffe'
Interviewing
Mrs. Clement A. Smith will in-
terview women interested in the
Radcliffe College Graduate Man-
agement Training Program from
3 to 5 p.m. today and from 10 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Bu-
reau of Appointments.
The program includes courses
taught by members of the Har-
vard Graduate School of Busi-
ness Administration and two per-
iods of field work.
The first field assignment of
four weeks concerns personnel re-
lations with manual laborers. The
second period of six weeks involves
administrative experience.
Interview appointments may be
made through the Bureau at Rm.
3528, Administration Bldg.

the second person, Kiddie dis-
cussed the social implications and
traced the history of the word
'vos' through its stages of meaning.
ORIGINALLY indicating for-
mality, then insult, the use of
vos' finally fell into disuse in
Spain. However, Kiddle pointed
out that it was brought to the
Western Hemisphere during the
period of Spanish colonization,
and today is a subject of contro-
versy in the Spanish speaking
countries of Central and South
America.
Basing his conclusions on a
study of students from Span-
ish-American Spanisli speaking
countries made here at the Uni-
versity, Kiddle divided these
countries into three main groups,
those in which the 'vos' form is
used exclusively, those in which
only the 'tu' form is used, and
those in which both forms are
in conflict.
With Peru as the center of con-
flict, Kiddle pointed out that in
areas where the 'vos' form is not
standard it is generally considered
more crude than the 'tu' form, and
for this reason will probably fall
into eventual disuse.

vil

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
FILL 'ER UP-Wide eyed and wide mouthed, five-year-old David
Wall stoically receives the undivided atfention of Robert Everett,
'53D, 'in the University's Dental Clinic for children. Senior dental
students spend 16 hours per week during a five week period in the
clinic which handles children from pre-kindergarten years until
the age when their permanent teeth begin to appear.

--Daily-Malcolm Shatz
STAGE CREW SETS SCENE FOR 'FAUST'

4

FEW FACILITIES:
City Planners Deplore Lack
Of Men's Recreational Areas

F

The City Planning Commission
has charged that the University,
with 28 per cent of the total Ann
Arbor population, has "overlooked
the necessity of providing recre-
ational areas adjacent to men's
dorms."
Evaluating Ann Arbor's recrea-
tional facilities, the Commission
pointed out that although the city
has 857 acres of land in-park and
recreation areas, playground facil-
ities are still inadequate, both for
children's playgrounds and for
men students in the University.
* * *
IT EXPLAINED that the reason
for the conflict is that 707 acres
of the land are in the form of
large parks such as the Arboretum,
University and municipal golf
courses, and the Botanical Gar-
dens.
University officials generally
agreed with the commission's
statements but said that noth-
ing can be done about the prob-
lem at the present.
Manager of service enterprises,
Frank Shiel, said, "I go right
along with the city planning com-
French Talks
To Be Given
Mlle. Elizabeth Nizan, former
actress and "societaire" of La
Comedie Francaise, will give a lec-
ture-recital at 4:15 p.m., today in
Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
She will give scenes from Mol-
iere's "Les Precieuses Ridicules"
and "Les Femmes Savantes."
Mlle. Nizan will present "Les
Comediens et leurs Auteurs"at
11:10 a.m. tomorrow in Rm. 3-S
of the Union and "Actualite de la
Fontaine" at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
The lecture-recitals are present-
ed under the auspices of the De-
partment of Romance Languages.
The first and third lectures will be
open to the public, while the sec-
ond will be reserved for faculty
and students in French.

mission in their recommendation.
There are not scattered playground
facilities where the public needs
them."
But he pointed out that the
University does not at the present
have land that it can convert into
playgrounds unless someone gives
it as a gift.
ISA Election
Results Given
Results of the International Stu-
dents' Association's House of Rep-
resentatives election were an-
nounced last night.
National candidates chosen are
as follows: Brazil, Julio de Car-
valho, Grad.; Canada, Murray
Copeland, Grad.,' John Clements,
'56NR and Daphne Price, '55; Col-
umbia, Fernando Sabbagh, Grad.;
Germany, Sigurd Dulz, Grad., and
Greece, George Zotiades, Grad.
Others elected were: Israel, Yor-
am Gorin, '55E; Korea, Yong Suk
Kuh, '56BAd.; Latvia, Maiga Jes-
alins.. United Kingdom, James
Ferguson, '56; Venezuela, Jose Sal-
azar, '53; Egypt, Aly Roafat; Leb-
anon, Labib Bardawil, E Spec.;
Iraq, Anastas Farjo, '55E; Thai-
land, Patiphat Arayasastra, '53
BAd.; Japan, Yukihisa Suzuki, '54
and Toru Yamamotu, Grad.
Regionally-elected representa-
tives are these: Asia, Gordon Gap-
per, Grad. and Robin Weerakoon,
Grad.; Europe, Jean Gilbert, Grad.,
Edouard Planchon, '54 and Irm
Vanden Berge, '56, and Latin
America, Gil Cardenas, '54E and
Jose Teran, '54A&D.
Group Continues
Shakespeare Play
The Arts Theater's production
of William Shakespeare's "Much
Ado About Nothing" will continue
its engagement at the theater at
209% E. Washington through Sat-
urday.

What
does a

.;, f
' r
$'

C.VA.
Engineer,..

...........

4
-4
A
A
-I

i

1

Using the basic principles of engineering and science he designs,
develops and tests jet aircraft or guided missiles for specific military
missions. His tools are his college training, the company's 35 years of
experience in fighter aircraft design, the knowledge available from basic
and applied research in many fields, the excellent facilities for research
and testing and the cooperative efforts of his fellow engineers. Under
youthful leadership he perfects his technical skill and develops his
ability to direct others in the design and production of jet aircraft and
guided missiles.
Engineering the jet aircraft and guided missiles of tomorrow
requires the application of knowledge from many fields. Technical
assignments are available in such types of work as the design and analy-
sis of specialized electronic components, structural and hydraulic testing,

4

4

ONE STOP at
Packard Laundry
takes care of all 3.
and fast!

4],

L
LOOKI NO
FOR
SOMETH ING?
This classified ad was
answered after only one day.

A

F
C
/
0

LAUNDRY
1/2-Hour Service
Using Maytag Automatic Washers . ..
that wash clothes realty clean tServe
yourself, WASH & DRY in less than 1
hour. No risk of damage to your daintiest
washables.
DRY CLEANING
10% Discount
Cash and carry discount for expert, guar-
anteed work by Michigan Dry Clean-
ers Co.

R. C. BLAYLOCK, A. E., Michigan
University, Assistant Chief Engineer,
Chance Vought Aircraft, will interview
graduates of the class of '53 in the
Placement Office, MARCH 5-6. Mr.
Blaylock is looking forward to the
opportunity of discussing with you your
future as a Chance Vought Engineer.

structural and mechanical design, applied aerodynamics, power plant
analysis and testing, stress and vibration analysis and flight testing.
If you are receiving a degree in Aeronautical Engineering, Mechan-
ical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mathe-
matics or Physics, we invite you to discuss your future in the aviation
industry with us. Contact your Placement Director for an appointment
for your interview with the Chance Vought Aircraft representative.

4i

-j

r

I

n v r 9% a" 94 no r% t so AV% rR 1

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan