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February 17, 1952 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

ONE OF THE COUNTRY'S BEST:
University 'Hides' Wood Tech Lab
a

By MIKE WOLFF
Tucked behind Victor Vaughn
House in the former University
Hospital steam plant is the brick
and. wood building that houses
the little known Wood Technology
Laboratory.
The laboratory has become "one1
of the best equipped of its kind in
the country" since its founding in
1928, according to Prof. William.
Kynoch, chairman of the wood
technologydepartment.
"Its primary use is to train stu-
dents to function in technical ca-
pacities - in the nation's rapidly
growing wood industries," Prof.
Kynoch explained.
IN STUDYING the physical and
chemical properties of wood and
its industrial applications, the
plaid-shirted wood technologists
utilize modern equipment along
with the conventional hammer and
saw. Two dialectric heaters that
dry glue in Fifteen seconds with
radio frequency waves are the lat-
est of the department's acquisi-
tions.
The laboratory's facilities are
also devoted to research on the
many problems of wood techno-
logy. Sponsored by the National
Association of Furniture Man-
ufacturers, an adhesive-testing:
machine is under construction
by Alan A. Marra, research en-
gineer at the laboratory.
Efforts are underway at the la-
boratory to utilize sawdust and
wood chips for making boards.
This is an attempt to combat theE
vast waste of wood in industry.

Norway Choir Will Sing at Hill
One of the most famous choirs in Europe, the Singing Boys of
Norway, will present the eighth Choral Union Series concert at 8:30
p.m. Wednesday in Hill Auditorium.
Under the direction of Ragnvald Bjarne, the group will sing a
variety of numbers, ranging from "Echo" (two choruses in eight parts)
by Di Lasso, to "Ku Baane," a Norwegian Folksong. Other features
of the program will be violin solo "Violin-Romance in D" by Svendsen,
piano solo, "The March of Sinclair" by Grieg, and vocal solo "Hear
My Prayer" by Mendelssohn.

Hill Auditorium - Ann Arbor
MONDAY, MARCH 7 -8:00 P.M.
THE PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION
PRESENTS

A

DOBL TH AUH*TI YAR

-Daily-Larry Wilk
REGISTERER'S AID-Members of the Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity nan their information
booth to help students find their lost ID cards-or themselves--amid the tangles of registration.

AND HIS NEW
MUSICA LDEPRECIATION
NE x REVUE of1952N gG$s
Ja"tewg THE CITY SLICKERS and COMPANY OF 44

-

Service Fraternity Aids Stu

dents

-s

M.

Students who struggled through
the inevitable lines at registration
last week were given the chance
to solve some of their problems at
the information booth run by the
Alpha, Phi. Omega service frater-
nity.
APO is a national service fra-
ternity composed of students with
a background in Scouting who de-
sire to render service to their
school and community.
THE FRATERNITY is now look-
ing for new pledges. Students who
are interested may attend an op-
en 'meeting at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
Rm. 3-KLM of the Union, accord-
ing to Ed Lokker, '53 Ed., presi-
dent of the local chapter.
"Members may belong to a so-
cial fraternity but they must have
been affiliated with the Scouting
movement at some time," Lokker
said.
The information booth at regis-
tration is only one of the numer-
ous services conductedrannually
by the Michigan chapter.
Members engage in such var-
ied activities as helping to police
' the SL elections, serving as
guides at the annual freshmen-
principal conference and setting
up the familiar "Keep Off the

Grass" signs that dot the cam-
pus every spring.
In past years a portion of the
money received by the fraternity
for handling the coat-checking
concession at J-Hop has been do-
nated to national charities and to
providing magazines for patients
at lo'cal hospitals.
Receipts from this year's J-Hop
will be used in part to cov4r opera-
tional expenses of the "Ugly Man"
contest to be held in April. Funds
from the contest will be used for

more than 700 sets of finger-
prints.
Assistant Registrar Edward G.
Groesbeck is the fraternity's pre-
sent faculty advisor. Many faculty
members, such as Norman L. Wil-
ley, retired professor of the Ger-
man department, have been ofj
service to the APO in past years.
T
Congress Mcay
Probe Nunan

I---------------------------------
MAIL ORDERS NOW - USE THIS FORM
I Checks payable to Panhellenic Association.
( Send to Panhellenic Assn., Michigan League, Ann Arbor
ENCLOSED with self-addressed, stamped envelope find I
($ for tickets at $1.80 for main floor seats.
$($ for tickets at $1.80 for center 1st balc. seats
$ for tickets at $1.50 for remainder 1st balc. seats
_$ _ for tickets at $1.20 for 2nd balcony seats
These tickets will admit me to the 8:00 p.m. show.
Name I
Address

WOOD RESEARCH--This is not a man from Mars but a student
at the Wood Technology Laboratory examining lumber being dried
in the laboratory's drying kiln. His asbestos suit, worn to with-3
stand the 180 degree temperature, has its own built-in air supply.

some charity
Foundation for
sis.

as the National
Infantile Paraly-

* * *

THE LOCAL
Phi Omega,
founded in the

chapter of AlphaI
Gamma Phi, was
fall of 1940 with

an elaborate installation banquet
in the Union Ballroom.
Although its early headquar-
ters were confined to the cellar
of a West Side office building
the men undertook such pro-
jects as a drive to secure stu-
dent and faculty fingerprints for
the civilian identification files
of the FBI. University former
president, Alexander G. Ruth-
ven, was the first to be finger-
printed in the drive, that netted

At present, a thousand pieces of
In Tax Ca$e furniture are being rotated be-
tween rooms under summer and
WASHINGTON - Con- 'winter conditions to determine the
ability of furniture to withstand
flicting statements over a mid- the varying humidity undergone
west brewery's tax case yesterday in the average home.
heightened prospects for a Con-
gressional investigation of Joseph Studeftsrlark
D. Nunan, Jr., former Internal St d n s M r
Revenue Commissioner.f
Day ofPrayer
This latest flareup was touched
off by Senator Williams (R-Del.)
when he reported in a Senate In observance of the annual
speech that Nunan was given spe- World Student Day of Prayer, a
cial permission to represent the special interdenominational serv-
now defunct Indianapolis Brewing ice will be held at 7 p.m. today
Co. Williams also questioned in the Methodist Church, 120 S.
whether the government got what State.
was due it.I The service that will be used
Nunan promptly denied he ever was written intGeneva, Switzer-
represented the brewery, or ac- land, for special international use
cepted fees from it. He said he did today. Foreign students wil par-
not recall ever asking permission ticipate here, reading scriptures
to represent it. in many different languages.
The service is sponsored by the
Inter-Guild Association and fea-
Local Voters tures a liturgical combined choir.

Florida Bombings
The Rev. Joseph Barth, of Mi-
ami, Florida, will discuss the ef-
fects of the Florida bombings on
his community and the rest of the
world at 2 p.m. today at Lane
Hall.
Dr. Barth, a Unitarian minis-
ter, is sponsored by the Unitarian
Student Group,
--
STUDENT

i

NEW SHIPMENTS of
USED TEXTBOOKS
arriving daily!
NEW BOOKS IF YOU PREFER
For that hard-to-find textbook

SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS

I

I

"+./

REPAIRED
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT

Campus Art Museum Oldest
Public Gallery in Michigan

Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago Wirerecorders
MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177

i

a

Collections dating back nearly
100 years make the Museum of
Art at the University the oldest
public art gallery in Michigan.
Exhibition space specifically for
the Museum's collections was not
set aside until five years ago,
when it was reorganized as a
separate unit.
Now, at least once a month;
new exhibits are on display to the
public at Alumni Memorial Hall
from 9 to 5 p.m. during the week
'Y and from 2 to 5 p.m. on Sundays.
These are-usually rented from na-
tional art agencies.
The Museum's chief purpose,

according to Director Jean Paul
Slusser, is to give students direct
acquaintance with original works
of art. Although it doesn't ex-
pect to compete with the great
metropolitan galleries, he says,
the Museum still faces the need
of expanding its collections.
Gifts are frequent and most
welcome, Prof. Slusser says. By
budgeting exhibition expenses,
the Museum manages to purchase
additions which have been con-
centrated in the three categories
of drawings and prints of all per-
iods, modern sculpture and mod-
ern painting.

;{r S{}:>":i":}i":7""i:Si":: c
.~~~ rr .r
ii
V~ r
Y?
: 9

To Go to Polls
(Continued from Page 1)
H i s opponent, Mummery, al
University alumnus, has "never
been completely pleased" with
Council operations and wants to
find out how it works.
* * *
THE FIFTH Ward contest finds
two University men shooting for
the Dembcratic aldermanic nomi-
nation, Dean Coston, a 28 year old
radio engineer at station WUOM,
and Hugh F. Pierce, a lecturer in
the School of Education.
In his campaign statement
Coston said, "If I am nomina-
ted I will exert every effort to
encourage registration and vot-
ing .. . in the ward so that our
Councilmen can be made more
aware of the problems and de-
sires of the citizens in the Fifth
Ward."
The ,42 year old Pierce, has de-
clared he'll try to "make the tax
dollar go as far as possible . . .
The only way to do this is by ef-
ficiency in city government."
-The polls will be open from 7
a.m. to 8 p.m. tomorrow.
Lecture on Egypt
Colin Roberts, reader in papy-
rology of Oxford University, will
lecture on "Literature and Society
in Graeco-Roman Egypt" at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The lecture is sponsored by the
department of classical studies.

Following the service at 8 p.m.
in the Wesleyan Guild lounge,
The Rev. Roy Burkhart, minister
of the Community church in Co-
lumbus, Ohio, will speak on
"Courtship to Marriage."

Read and Use
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