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May 02, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-02

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D

FRIDAY, MAY 2,1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TIE MORNING LINE

SWolv rine

Nine

Meets

Iowa

Today

v

By TED PAPES

* * *

<">

IT IS WITH SOME MEASURE of reluctance that this writer closes
the book on the Morning Line with this edition.
As followers of Daily sport pages well know, a new sports editor
has been appointed. Just as sons are entitled to grow taller than their
fathers, so Ed Whipple and his two able associates, Dick Sewell and
John Jenks, can be expected to provide a greater service to Michigan
sports fans during the next year.
After three years as a sportswriter for this paper, there are certain
summary observations which I would like to pass along to our readers.
Sports 'Belong' at Michigan
FIRST OF ALL, there is the firm conviction that varsity and intra-
mural athletics have an essential and well-deserved place in college
life here.
The University covers such a wide expanse of area and population
that student unity is achieved only with great difficulty. If there is
any feeling which brings together the business student, the scientist,
the artist and all the other classifications on the campus, it is the
common concern over the outcome of a Wolverine football game or
hockey match.
Besides this effect on the general student community there
are certain benefits to the individuals in competition, Allen Jack-
son's editorial not withstanding.
That is not to say there are no athletic 'bums' under the Michigan
banner. There are. But in my experience as a writer following the
Wolverines I was especially impressed by the high calibre man who
consistently made the first teams. A big peicentage of the players are
well rounded personalities who conduct themselves as gentlemen.
Two men I shall never forget. They are Bennie Oosterbaan
and Ernie McCoy whose philosophies I would back to the hilt
whether they won championships or lost every game they played.
They are big league coaches who still have time to consider per-
sonalities. Players are something more than machines when oper-
ating under their direction.
Unlike many sports figures in high places, they are not too "big"
to give the public consideration. These are things which a sports-
writer can feel as he goes about his work.
* * *
Still Room for Improvement.
UNFORTUNATELY THERE ARE certain bad features which auto-
matically accrue to any school system which embraces inter-
collegiate athletic competition. Some players inevitably lose their pers-
pective and attach too much importance to their sports career. Some
coaches, especially minor ones, have delusions of grandeur and visual-
ize themselves as people of special privilege..
It is generally believed that Michigan is not a big offender in
this matter of over-emp asis. An alert administration and a
watchful faculyt can make great strides in improving weaknesses
in the Wolverine system.
It is in the intramural department that a doctor is needed imme-
diately. Obviously the facilities are much too limited to give our stu-
dents an outlet for their sport tendencies.
A typical example was the situation on the Ferry Field soft-
ball diamonds the other day where our outfielders were rubbing
elbows with those of two other teams while trying to play a fra.
ternity league game. There were no pillow bases and the fields
were in pitiful condition.
This is an appeal to the administration to spend some money as
soon as possible on the rank and file student who cannot earn a block
'M' but still would jump at the chance to play on an organized team
with his pals for some exercise and a few laughs, just to break the
monotony of studies.
A final word of thanks is in order to George Flint and Jim Parker
who were my colleagues on the senior sports editorial staff this year.
Good luck to them and to all good sports.

Fisher Names Yirkosky
For Starting Assignment

FOILED GRIDDER:
Wright Shines as Golfer
Despite Pigskin Setback

-Daily-Matty Kessler
DICK YIRKOSKY
... hawkeye hex?

Chisox Win
On Dobson's
Two Hit Ball
By The Associated Pressn
PHILADELPHIA -- Joe Dobson,
Chicago White Sox veteran right-
hander, held the Philadelphia Ath-
letics hitless for seven and a third
innings last night and then went
on to-turn in a two-hit 3-0 victory.
Righthander Bob Hooper, who
beat Chicago four times without
a loss last year, matched Dobson
for six innings but yielded two runs
in the seventh and one in the
ninth.
BROWNS 6, BOSOX 1
BOSTON-Righthander Duane
Pillette threw a five-hitter against
the Boston Red Sox and batted in
three runs yesterday to give the
St. Louis Browns a 6-1 victory that
moved them to withi na game of
the American League's top-place.
* * *
TIGERS 5, YANKS 4
NEW YORK - Dizzy Trout
stifled a New -York Yankee rally
with a spectacular ninth .inning
relief job last night as Detroit sav-
ed a 5-4 win for Art Houtteman.
Successive two-run homers by
Vic Wertz in the fourth and fifth
innings built up an early Detroit
cushion.
* * *
CUBS 7, DODGERS 2
CHICAGO-The Chicago Cubs,
1951 tail-enders, nearly reached
the top of the National League
yesterday, with a 7-2 spanking of
first place Brooklyn as Johnny
Klippstein weathered late-inning
pressure to win his first start of
the season.
* * *
GIANTS 13, PIRATES 5
PITTSBURGH-Jim Hearn al-
lowed four hits and one run in
the first five innings and coasted
home yesterday while his New
York Giant teammates blasted five
Pittsburgh Pirate hurlers for 14
hits and a 13-5 triumph.
s s* *
REDS 7, BRAVES 6
CINCINNATI - Herman Weh-
meier had to have help in the
ninth inning for the second
straight time and Frank Smith
again put out the fire as the Cin-
cinnati Reds took a 7 to 6 victory
from the Boston Braves today.
LATE SCORES
Washington 8, Cleveland 1
Philadelphia (N) 6, St. Louis'/3

By WARREN WERTHEIMER
Michigan goes after its fourth
straight Conference win today
when they meet a dark horse Iowa
nine at Iowa City.
Dick Yirkosky is Coach Ray
Fisher's choice to open the week-
end road. trip. The left-handed
hurling junior is looking for his
fourth win without a loss. He
opened the 'M' Conference season
last Friday with a 20-7 win over
Illinois.
* * *
THE HAWKEYES are a major
obstacle in the path of a Wolver-
me Big Ten baseball title. Eight
lettermen are back from last year's
Iowa squad which finished the
season with a four won and eight
lost conference record. Included
among these four victories were
two over Michigan with whom the
Iowans ended up in an eighth
place tie.
Otto H. Vogel, now in his
twenty-fifth season as baseball
coach at Iowa, has guided the
Hawkeyes to five Big Ten crowns
and ansoverall .610 average.
Vogel's major rebuilding job this
year has been in the outfield. Du-
ane Brandt, who led the regulars
in batting with a .321 mark last
season, is the only returning let-
terman who will patrol the outer
gardens. The fight for the remain-
ing two berths has been between
John McKinney, Robert Beals, and
Ken Buckles.
McKINNEY, a twenty-one year
old junior, got into two games
last year. A sprinter on the Iowa
track team, he can cover a lot of
territory. Beals and Buckles were

both all-state high school ball
players it Iowa. The former won a
minor "I" last year as a junior.
The Hawkeyes have an all
veteran infield although two of
the returnees are converted out-
fielders. Jack Lindquist has been
brought in from right field to
play third base and Frank Bok
has been changed to a first
baseman. Co-Captain Tom Sten-
ger at short and Jack Hess at
second round out the infield.
Hess had a very good season
in '51 as he compiled a .308 bat-
ting overage and committed but
one error in ten contests. Lind-
quist, Bok and Stenger are all
good clutch hitters as shown by
their combined RBI total of
twenty-nine. Lindquist smacked
the ball at a tidy .306 pace last
year.
* * *
IN THE BATTERY department,
the Vogel men are well fortified.
The catching staff is headed by
co-captain Bill Vana, returning
leterman who batted .313 the pre-
vious season. He will be aided and
abetted by Jerry Hidgenberg and
.Bob Heppenstall, two bright young
prospects.
The mound staff is formed
around three veteran hurlers in-
cluding Bob Diehl, 6'4" right-
hander who had a 3-1 record in
'51, and Al Lenski also a right-
hander who permitted only four
earned runs in 22 innings ofI
pitching.
Southpaw Jim Andreasen who
won his only decision last year
gives the Iowans portside strength.

By RUSS AIUTO
While a burly Wolverine links-
man swings away daily on the
University Golf Course, across the
road at Ferry Field Bennie Ooster-
baan drives his football charges
with the same dogmatic enthusi-
asm, occasionally realizing that
the Michigan golfer, Hugh Wright,
is an example of a success story
in one sport and a disappointment
in another.
When this rotund creature, who
is dubbed "Bear" by his fraternity
brothers, came to Michigan, he
was intent on playing football,
but, as many high school stars
soon discover, he found Big Ten
football no picnic.
*. *~ *
REALIZING THAT he was get-
ting nowhere in the sport he
thuoght himself most proficient
in, Hugh elected to give up foot-

-Daily-Larry Wik
HUGH WRIGHT
. .. fairway demon

Phi Chi Defeats Nu Sigs, 5-2;
Alpha Omega Takes Slugfest

football and concentrate on golf.
This choice resulted in one of
the Michigan golf team's most
improved players, and a real
asset to a squad that appears to
be title-bound.
Hugh started his golf career at
Battle Creek High as a freshman.
In his senior year he captained
both the football and golf teams,
but showed the most prowess on
the gridiron. His golf squad tool
second in the state that year, and
Battle Creek High has never come
up with an equal.
* * *
TOURNAMENT TITLES seem
to have eluded Hugh throughout
his career, for he has never quite
had the phenomenal luck required
to win a major tournament. He
did, however, place second in one
of Canada's biggest tournaments,
the Manitoba Arpeteur. One of his
greatest ambitions is to walk away
with a victory in a major collegiate
tournament before he leaves col-
lege.
Perhaps the paramount reason
for his failure to win these big
matches is his lack of confidence
in his putting. This problem,
with the aid of Coach Bert Katz-
enmeyer and hours of practice,
is becoming less serious as time
progresses.
While his putting is faulty, his
driving is conversely flawless. His
tremendous power and perfect
form have resulted in matchless
drives. This portion of his game
is his greatest asset and, unlike
other parts of it, he has complete
confidence in his drives.
The University Golf Course
will be closed all day Saturday
due to the Intramural tourna-
ment.
-Harry Kaseberg
With Katzenmeyer's expert
coaching and his growing confi-
dence, Hugh feels this is his best
year thus far and, like the other
men on the squad, has that in-
dominable spirit that epitomizes a
championship team.

Gordie Howe Given Hockey's
'Most Valuable Player' Award

Ed Sheldon, in a sparkling per-
formance on the mound, held Nu
Sigma Nu to three hits, as Phi Chi
defeated the Nu Sigs, 5-2, in pro-
fessional fraternity softball play
yesterday.
Alpha Omega downed Delta Sig-
ma Pi, 14-9, in another profes-
sional fraternity game. Milford
Ginsberg and Leonard Posner
combined their talents on the
mound for the win. After a few
walks in the first inning, the hit-
ters took over for the rest of the
day.
IN A GAME marked by contin-
uous excitement, Sigma Alpha Mu
outpointed Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
7-6, in a playoff of a previously
ties contest. By virtue of their win,
the Sammies advance into the
first-place playoffs of the social
fraternity circuit.
The score stood at 6-3 going
into the last half of the sixth

and final inning, with the
SAE's out in front. Four runs
later, the Sammies emerged vic-
torious. Bart Mann singled in
the winning run for the victors.
Irv Tobocman hurled and was
credited with the win.
Shield and Storm shared pitch-
ing honors as Delta Sigma Delta
swamped Alpha Chi Sigma, 20-3,
in the professional fraternity lea-
gue. The manner of making runs
did not seem important to the
Delta Sigs as they scored on num-
erous walks and hits.
DESPITE HOMERS by Jerry
Griffin and Tom Dudley, Psi Ome-
ga squeeked through with a 5-4 de-
cision over Alpha Kappa Psi. Pete
Gorsche pitched well for the losers.
In residence hall tennis, Cooley
House took Taylor House, 2-1,
winning second singles and the
doubles matches.

MONTREAL ---(IP)- Gordie
Howe, star forward of the National
Hockey League champion Detroit
Red Wings, was named yesterday
as the most valuable player in the
League for the 1951-'52 season.
Howe, 24, was awarded the cov-
eted Hart Trophy which is award-
ed annually to "the player ad-
judged to be most valuable to his
team." Besides the trophy Howe
will receive a $1,000 check from
the League and $1,004~ from his
club.
THE LANKY STAR, whose
career and life almost ended a
few years ago when he was severe-
ly injured in a playoff game,
polled 62 out of a possible 90
points in winning the trophy for
the first time.
Howe received nine first place
nominations from the panel of
18 sportswriters and sportscast-
ers-three from each N.H.L.
city. The points were awarded
on a five for first choice, three
for second and one for third.
Elmer Lach, veteran Montreal
center, finished second with 46
points. Goalie Jim Henry of Bos-
ton was third with 14 points and
Milt Schmidt of Boston, last year's
Hart Winner, and All-Star Goalie
Terry Sawchuk of Detroit, tied for
fourth place with 13 points each.
Howe led the league in scoring

for the second straight year in
the 1951-52 season with a record
equalling 86 points. He collected
47 goals, high for the league, and
39 assists. In the 1950-51 cam-
paign he tallied 43 goals and 43
assists. t

r I

I t

Major League Standings

Ii

' AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct GB
Boston ............10 3 .769 -
y St. Louis ........... 9 4 .692 1
Cleveland .......... 9 6 .600 2
Chicago ............ 7 6 .538 3
r Washington ....... 5 6 .453 4
New York .......... 5 7 .417 4Y
Detroit ............ 3 9 .250 61
Philadelphia ....... 2 9 .182 7
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Washington (night)
Chicago at Philadelphia (night)
Detroit at New York
St. Louis at Boston

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Brooklyn .......... 8 3 .727 Y2
Chicago ............10 4 .714 --
New Y'ork .......... 8 4 .667 1
Cincinnati ......... 9 5 .643 1
St. Louis .......... 6 8 .42944
Philadelphia ....... 5 7 .417 4
Boston ............. 5 10 .333 5>4
Pittsburgh..........3 13 .187 8
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Chicago
New York at Pittsburgh (night)
Boston at Cincinnati (night)
Philadelphia at St. Louis (night)

i

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