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May 02, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-02

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY ", 1952

ra

ARTFICIAL SYNTHESIS:
White Says Lower Life
May Be Created in Lab

4

By MIKE WOLFF

The low and simple forms of life
may be created by artificial syn-
thesis in the laboratories of the
future, if t1he opinions of Prof. Les-
lie A. White, chairman of the an-
thropology department, prove cor-
rect.
According to Prof. White, the
difficulties confronting the artifi-
cial synthesis of life are probably
only technical ones that might be
overcome in the future.
* * *
CALLING THE problem merely
one of "rearranging already ex-
isting elements," the scientist add-
ed that the synthesis of organic
chemical compounds was once
thought impossible but has now
been achieved.
At present many scientists are
attempting the synthesis of life
by trying to duplicate photo-
synthesis-the process by which
plants turn the sun's rays into
energy and food--according to
the professor.
Prof. White was not willing; to
make any bets that future gener-
ations of humans would be born
in test tubes, however. "The high-
er forms of life are not formed by
synthesis but by evolutionary pro-
cesses that take millions of years,"
he said.
Prof. Alfred H. Stockard, direc-
tor of the Biological Station, felt
that while not impossible, there
were astronomical chances against
creating these genetic controls.
Without these controls, the de-
velopment into human beings
would be improbable, he said.
Requirements
For Diplomatic!
Corp Lowered
The requirements for Foreign
Service officers have been liberal-
ized, a State Department bulletin
announced yesterday.
The minimum age limit has been
lowered to 20 and the previously
stringent foreign language require-
ment may be passed after an ap-
plicant is already in the Depart-
ment's Foreign Service Training
Institute.
In this way candidates will be
able to learn languages abroad in
the countries where they are spo-
ken.
All University students who are
American citizens and between 20
and 30 years old are qualified to
apply for the diplomatic positions.
TOAY and SATURDAY
LIKE THE FURY OF TNE
BLAST FURNACE-were the

>

* * *

'U' To Fete
High School
PupilsHere
Over seven hundred high school
students will be given a whirl-
wind tour and inspection of the
campus today for the annual Uni-
versity Day.
Coming from all over Michigan
and parts of Ohio, the future col-
lege students will be shown high-
lights of the University campus..
Speeches, movies, songs and cheers
are included in the seven hour
program.
SPEECHES BY President Har-
lan Hatcher, Dean Walter Rea, Dr.
Clyde Vroman, Director of Admis-
sions, azid William Jentz,$ Union
President, will highlight the gen-
eral meeting at Rackham Audi-
torium.
Following the talks the Uni-
versity Glee Club will present
several Michigan songs, followed
by the Michigan cheer leaders.
After the morning tour, meals
will be searved in the South Quad
and Stockwell Hall. Conferences
with counselors from the different
schools for advice and information,
will be provided after lunch.
Concluding the day, a coffee'
hour will be held in the afternoon
for the visiting faculty members.

WONDER PRODUCT SELLS:
Chlorophyll Excites Advertising World

By BOB JAFFEE.
For centuries nobody but the
cow paid particular attention to
grass.
Now after all these years the
business world is turning an en-
vious eye to the green pastures
which might prove to furnish the
biggest boon in advertising his-
tory. The source of all the excite-
ment is the new wonder product
chlorophyll, the material that
makes plants green.
* * *
THE FIRST TIME this green
gold was incorporated into a com-
mercial offering was as a home
deodorizer. Since then, through
widespread advertising campaigns
and scientific ballyhoo, chlorophyll
has oozed its way into dozens of
other products promising to do
everything from banishing B.O.
and halitosis to restoring hair.
On the retail counters now are
deodorizing lozenges and tablets,
chewing gum, mouthwash, sham-
poo, impregnated toilet tissue,
toothpaste and dog food to help
keep Rover smelling nice-pro-
ducts all containing the magic
green stuff.
They've even come up with shoe
insoles doused with chlorophyll to
keep feet smelling fresh.
Commenting on this recent
chlorophyll frenzy, Professor
Edmund Wooding, advertising
instructor in the journalism de-

** 8 * #

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST--Copy Delitsch, Assyriches Leses-
tucke, Room 407 Greene Hse. 2-4591.
Reward. ) 52L
LOST-?5 karat diamond from man's
ring. Vicinity Room 25 Angell Hall.
Reward. Phone 2-1334 after 5:15 p.m.
)53L
LOST-Rolled up $5 bill, May 1st. Vicin-
ity Angell Hall. Contact Ed. Ext. 752,
S.Q. 8112 Van Tyne. )54L
LOST-Silver colored four barrel Norma
pencil probably on South University.
Call Tom Cecil 3-4145. )55L
FOR SALE

-Daily-Don Campbell
'U' WOMAN GOES 'BACK TO NATURE' FOR CHLOROPHYLL

FCLASSIFIEDS
Find your name in the Classified Ads.
and win a free movie ticket.

-Jan Winn
...Sometime?
Local Students
Attend Big Ten
IFC Meeting
A delegation of five, including
the president elects of both the
Interfraternity Council and Pan-
hellenic left yesterday for the Big
Ten IFC Conference, in Madison,
Wisconsin.
The five University representa-
tives are Pete Thorpe '53, IFC pre-
sident; Diane Harris, '53, Panhel
president; Assistant to the Dean of
Students Joseph Fee; Mark Sand-
ground, '52, retiring I]FC secretary;
and another representative of Pan-
hel.
The only item formally sched-
uled on the conference agenda, ac-
cording to Thorpe, is a discussion
of Stewards Associations.
This may be of particular im-
portance, however, since one of
the major planks of Thorpe's
election platform was the forma-
tion of an IFC Stewards Associa-
tion to raise food purchasing ef-
fieciency and cut rising costs.
A conference with Univer-
sity authorities has been tenta-
tively scheduled for next week to
discuss the possibilities of such an
organization.
Workshops in general problems
confronting fraternities will also
be held, Thorpe declared.
SL Urges Student
Letters to Hatcher
SL is sponsoring another project
seeking to narrow the gap between
students and administration.
Students are urged to write let-
ters to SL suggesting topics to be
covered by President Harlan H.
Hatcher in his Convocation speech
May 12. Letters will be submitted
to President Hatcher according to
frequency of subject.
Letters must be sent to The Stu-
dent Legislature building, 122 S.
Forest by May 6.
New Facings Turn
Angell Hall White
White limestone facing are
now being added to both sides of
Angell Hall.
This new construction develop-
ment is par-t of the Angell Hall
Addition project started I a s t
Spring. The limestone will match
that of the present Angell front
making for a uniform facing of
the entire building.
According to construction crew
members and supervisors, work is
proceeding according to schedule,
the new project in no way inter-
fering with the estimated August
completion of the Addition. Classes
will be held in the Addition next
semester, according to University

partment said, "This is another
instance of the excess typical in
American marketing."
"Business is always on the look-
out for some new gimmick, some
hypodermic needle with which to
innoculate the public, a public
which has been made receptive to
the glitter presented to them by
the advertising industry."
"For," continued Prof. Wooding,
"the people are always searching
for a new nostrum, a new quick

and easy cure of human social
problems, whether those problems
be gingivitis, halitosis or falling
eyebrows."
Miss DSR Winner
Steve Qua, '54E, was declared
winner of the Michigras grand
prize-a date with Miss DSR of
Detroit for May.
Harry Blum, '54, Michigras prize
chairman announced, the award
last night.

Your Official UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN RING is waiting
for you - NOW - at
Burr Patt's, 1209 S. Univ.

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )6B
TYPEWRITER & Fountain Pen repair
work a specialty. Typewriters, Adding
Machines and W/C TApe and Wire
Recorders. Morrills, 314 S. State St.
)9B
ACCURATE TYPING-Done promptly.
Reasonable Rates. Phone 2-9437. )12B
TYPING-Reasonable Rates. Accurate
& Efficient: Phone 7590. 830,5o. Main.
1B
RADIO OR PHONO TROUBLES?
Before you pay unreasonable repair
bills it will pay you to investigate our
service. With over 10 yrs. experience
and the finest training, we fully
guarantee our work, yet keep our
charges at a minimum. Ann' Arbor
Radio, Ph. 7942. 1215 East Univ.--1'2
blocks east of E. Engr. )16B
APPLICATION PHOTOS while you wait,
4 for $1. Snider Studio, 213 S. Main.
Phone 7431. Hours 9-11, 2-5. )11B
HELP WANTED
GIRL for part-time work. U & M
Cleaners. 1306 So. Uni. )38H
TWO YOUNG WOMEN under 40 years
of age for office work. Must furnish
own transportation and plan to work
two or three years as a minimum.
The first position is for dispatcher
and work consists of answering tele-
phone and sending out orders. The
other position is operating the post-
ing machine and this can be by the
hour, and take 30-40 hours a week.
For interview call Killins Gravel Com-
pany. Phone 2-2515. )33H
SALESLADY--Fulltime and afternoon
work available. Top salary to right
party. Pleasant working conditions,
air-conditioned shop. Randell's, 306
S. State. )31H
WANTED-Man age twenty or over to
instruct in riding in Wisconsin boys'
camp, July 1st to August 25th. Also
sailing counselor. Reply to Dr. Don
C. Broadbridge, 42 Edgemere aRd.
Grosse Pointe, Michigan. )34H
YOUNG LADY for part time work at
Soda Fountain. Swifts Drug Store.
340 So. State, Ph. 2-0534. )39H
SHIRLEY STEVENS pick up free thea-
ter ticket at Daily office.
ROOMS FOR RENT
DOUBLE AND SINGLE for men. Reduc-
ed rates. Phone 27044. )27R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television,
518 E. William. Phone 3-8454. )26R
APARTMENT for 4 graduate men. Fur-
nished, private bath. First floor, pri-
vate entrance, close to campus. Call
2-5255 after 6:00 & Sun. call 3-1034.
)24R

DO I
~ DAILY FFICIALBULLTI

)58

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11
a.m. on Saturday).
FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1952
VOL. LXII, No. 147
Faculty, College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts: Meeting, Mon., May 5,
4:10 p.m., 1025 Angell Hall.
Agenda
1. Consideration of the minutes of the
meeting of April 14, 1952 (pp. 1767-1774).
2. Election to Executive Committee
Panel, Library Committee, Administra-
tive Board, and the Standing Commit-
tee on Curriculum.
3. Consideration of reports submitted
with the call to this meeting. a. Execu-
tive Committee-Prof. A. W. Bromage.
b. Executive Board of the. Graduate
School-Prof. H. R. Crane. No report.
c. Deans' Conference-Assoc. Dean B. D.
Thuma. No report.
4. Special Order. Student evaluation
of the Faculty.
5. Announcements.
6. New business.
To Instructors of Engineering Fresh-
men: Ten-week grades for all ENGI-
NEERING FRESHMEN are due in the
Secretary's Office, 263 West Engineering
Building on Fri., May 2.
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Students:
All those students who used the Uni-
versity's evaluation, or recommendation
Committee, and who have not been
contacted by phone, are requested to
come to 1009 Angell Hall at their earli-
est possible convenience, or to call ex-
tension 2741 and ask for the Pre-profes-
sional Secretary.
Late permission: Because of the Slide
Rule and Crease Balls, all women stu-
dents have a 1:30 a.m. late permission
on Friday. May 2.
Interviews for Summer Positions: The
director of Camp Nissokone, a camp
operated by the Y.M.C.A. of Detroit,
will be at the Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information, 3 to 5
p.m., today to interview men for camp
counseling positions. For appointment
call at 3528 Administration Building
or telephone University extension 2614.
Personnel Interviews.
The W. R. Grace Company of New
York will have a representative here
on Monday, May 5, to interview June
graduates particularly those in Business
Administration for training Positions in
the Statistical, Industrial, Foreign
Trade, Treasury or the Steamship De-
partment.
The Standard Vacuum Oil Company
will 'have a representative here on
Tuesday, May 6, and would like to talk
to Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Petro-
leum, and Industrial Engineers as well
as LSA and Business Administration!
graduates for Accounting and Market-
ing positions. Positions are open in Ja-
pan, Philippines, Malaya, Thailand, In-1
donesia, India, Pakistan and Ceylon.
The Massachusetts Mutual Life In-
surance Company of Detroit will be on
the campus Tuesday, May 6, to inter-a
view individuals graduating in June
who are interested in Sales work. This
would include lawyers as well as other
graduates.
The Parker Rust Proof Company of
Detroit will be on the campus Wednes-
day, May 7 to interview men for in-
dustrial sales to call on manufacturing
firms. Territories will be any place in'
the United States. These positions are

open to LSA or Business Administra-
tion graduates.
Personnel Requests.
Kendall Mills, Charlotte, North Caro-
lina has an opening for a Physicist for
their Research Department. Good ad-
vancement opportunities are open with
this expanding textile manufacturing
firm.
General Tire & Rubber Company, Ak-
ron, Ohio desires to hear from young
men who might qualify as traveling
auditors for this company. They are
also interested in young men who would
like to become Assistant Office Mana-_
gers, Credit Manager or Sales Service
Managers.
Arthur Fulmer, Memphis, Tennessee
would like to consider young men who
are interested in sales with large auto-
mobile seat cover and accessories man-
ufacturer.
Pet Milk Company, Bryan, Ohio needs
mechanical and electrical engineers. Ap-
plications and details may be secured
at the Bureau of Appointments.
Purdue University's Comptroller's Of-
fice, LaFayette, Indiana, is seeking two
young men who are training for or are
interested in college and university
business administration. Both positions
require an accounting background.
Anaconda Wire & Cable Company,
Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, would
be interested in receiving applications
for their Industrial Plant Management
Training Program from graduates in the
field of Mechanical Engineering, Indus-
trial Engineering or Industrial Manage-
ment.
Radio Corporation of America, RCA
Victor Division, Indianapolis, Indiana
is looking for Electrical Engineers, who
are interested in Manufacturing Engi-
neering or Production supervision.
Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Com-
pany, Paducah, Kentucky is seeking
young men with a degree in Mechanical,
Electrical, Civil, or Chemical Engineer-
ing.
Aluma-Lite Company of Detroit (A
Florida Corporation) is interested in
June graduates to take over protected
sales territories in Michigan, especially
in Wayne County. The company sells
roofing materials new on the market.
National Cash Register Company, To-
ledo, Ohio desires salesmen for cash
registers and accounting machines with
marketing and accounting background.
Minimum age requirement is 24.
For further details, application blanks
and information see the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration Build-
ing, extension 371.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the De-
partment of Botany, "The Vegetation of
Australia." H. B. S. Womersley, Uni-
versity of Adelaide, South Australia.
Friday, May 2, 4 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Academic Notices
The School of Education Testing Pro-
gram will be given on May 6 in Room
131, Business Administration Building.
The afternoon session will begin at 4:15
p.m."The evening session will begin at
7 p.m. All students who are working
toward a teacher's certificate and who
missed the March 25th administration
are required to attend.
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., May 2,
4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Dr. Freeman
D. Miller will speak on "Current Views
on Stellar Evolution from the USSR."
Bacteriology Seminar: Fri., May 2, 11
a.m., 1520 E. Medical Bldg. Speaker: Dr.
Ruth Lofgren. Subject: Principles and
Techniques in Microscopy and Photo-
micrography.

Seminar in Transonic Flow, Fri., May
2, 4 p.m., 1508 E. Engineering. Mr. H. P.
Leipman will discuss experimental re-
sults for flows and transonic range.
Psychology Colloquium: Fri., May 2,
4:15 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall. Dr.
Abraham Kaplan, Visiting Professor of
Philosophy, will speak on: "Can Psycho-
analysis be Logical?" Refreshments at
3:45.
Doctoral Examination for Walter S..
Holmlund, Education; thesis: "Design
and Evaluation of an In-Service Train-
ing Program for Teachers in Child
Growth and Development," Fri., May 2,
4019 University High School, 2 p.m.
Chairman, H. C. Koch.
Doctoral Examination for Lu-Shien
Hu, Civil Engineering; thesis: "The In-
stability of Top Chords of Pony Truss-
es," Fri., May 2, 315 W. Engineering
Bldg., 4 p.m. Chairman, L. C. Maugh.
Doctoral Examination for Stewart
Henry Rewoldt, Business Administra-
tion; thesis: "Some Economic Effects
of Marketing Research," Sat., May 3,
Conference Room, 7th floor, Business
Administration Bldg., 9:30 a.m. Chair-
man, D. M. Phelps.
Doctoral Examination for George
Richard Lawrence Gaughran, Zoology;
thesis: "A Comparative Study of the
Osteology and Myology of the Cranial
and Cervical Regions of Blarina brevi-
cauda kirtlandi and Scalopus aquaticus
marchrinus," Sat;, May 3, 2 p.m., 2089
Natural Science Bldg. Chairman, A. H.
Stockard.
Concerts
MAY FESTIVAL
Friday, May 2, 8:30: "The Damnation
of Faust"-Berlioz. Patricia Newoy, So-
prano; Set Svanholm, tenor; Philip
Duey, baritone; George London, bass;
The Philadelphia Orchestra; University
Choral Union; Thor Johnson, conduc-
tor.
Saturday, May 3, 2:30. Nathan Mil-
stein, violinist; The Youth Chorus;
Philadelphia Orchestra; Alexander Hils-
berg and Marguerite Hood, conductor.
Saturday, May 3, 8:30. Wagner pro-
gram. Astrid Varnay, soprano; Set
Svanholm, tenor; The Philadelphia Or-
chestra; Eugene Ormandy, conductor.
Sunday, May 4, 2:30. Walton's "Bel-
shazzar's Feast;"- Mack Harrell, bari-
tone; Jorge Bolet, pianist; Philadelphia
Orchestra; University Choral Union;
Thor Johnson, conductor.
Sunday, May 4, 8:30. Artist night.
Patrice Munsel, soprano; Philadelphia
Orchestra; Eugene Ormandy, conduc-
tor.
Concerts will begin on time and doors
will be closed during numbers. Tickets
on salb at Burton Tower until Thurs-
day morning, at which time all tickets
will be transferred to the Hill Audi-
torium box office.

Student Recital: Alexandra Moncrieff,
pianist will play compositions by Han-
del, Schubert, Beethoven, Liszt, and
Bartok, at 4:15 Friday afternoon, May 2,
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theater, in par-
tial fulfillment of Music degree. Miss
Montcrieff is a pupil of Ava Comin
Case, and her recital will be open to the
public.
Exhibitions
Student Exhibitions--College of Ar-
chitecture and Design through May 25
in the Museum of Art Galleries, Alumni
Memorial Hall. Monday through Satur-
day, 9 to 5; Sunday, 2 to 5. The public
is welcome.
Events Today
Motion Pictures, auspices of Univer-
sity Museums. "The Life of Plants,"
'Plant Traps," and "Fungus Plants."
Fri., May 2, 7:30 p.m., Kellogg Auditor-
ium. No admission charge.
Canterbury Club: Canterbury House
Tea, 4 p.m. All Episcopal students and
their friends are invited.
S. R. A. Coffee Hour, Lane Hall, 4:15-
'5:30 p.m.
Department of Astronopy. Visitors'
Night, 8 p.m. Dr. Lawrence H. Aller will
lecture on "The Moon and the Planets."
After the lecture in 3017 Angell Hall,
the Students' Observatory on the fifth
floor will be open for telescopic obser-
vation of Saturi and the Moon, if the
sky is clear, or for inspection of the
telescopes and planetarium, if the sky
is cloudy. Children are welsome, but
must be accompanied by adults.
Wesleyan Guild. Swimming party, 8
p.m. Meet at the Guild to go to the
IM building in a group.
Hillel Services will be held Friday
night at 7:15 and Saturday morning at
9:00 at the New Building, 1429 Hill St.
Arab Club. 'Meeting, 7 p.m. Mrs. H.
B. Lataurette will give a review of W.
0. Douglas book "Strange Lands and
Friendly People" at the International
Center. All are welcome. The Moslem
Religious Association holds Friday Noon
Prayer (Al Jomaa) at Lane Hall, upper
room, 12:30 p.m. All are welcome.
Coming Events
Economics Club. 8 p.m., Mon., May 5,
Rackham Amphitheater. Dr. Ewan
Clague, Commissioner of Labor Sta-
tistics, Department of Labor, will talk
on "Problems of the Cost of Living In-
dex." All staff members and students
Economics and Business Administra-
ton are invited to attend. Others who
are interested will be welcome.

ARMY & NAVY type oxfords. $6.88.
Sizes 6-12. A-F width. Open to 6 p.m.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash. Ph. 3-8611.
)50
28' 4-STAR GENERAL trailer complete-
ly modern. Sleeps 4. See G. Hibbard
at Ann Arbor Bank State St. office, or
after 5-3423 Carpenter Rd. Court No.
52. )102
PARAKEETS, cages. Must sell. Call
Bob 6735, between 6-8. )103
MOTORCYCLES, tires, batteries, ac-
cessories, and repairing. India Motor-
cycle Sales. 207 W. Liberty. Ph. 2-1748.
)104
1937 FORD-Excellent condition. Call
3-0849. After 8 p.m. )106
WHIZZER MOTORBIKE-3 h.p. motor,
excellent condition. Call after six.
2-2043. )108
FOR SALE-1935 2 door Chrysler, good
running condition. Best offer takes
it. Phone 2-1907. )109
WHITE FORMAL JACKET-Size 36-37.
Like new. $12. Call 2-7504 after 4 p.m.
)110
CALVIN ASERI pick up free theater
ticket at Daily office.
MISCELLANEOUS
INCREASE your reading speed with the
Reading Accelerator. A competent
tutor, Miss Schneider, 3-8104. )31M
NOW IS THE TIME
Let the U & M DRY CLEANERS AND
LAUNDRY do your cleaning, low rates.
One-day serv. no ext. 1306 So. Uni.
)23P
SPECIAL-on all perm. $5.00 & up. Mod-
ern Beauty Shop, 117 S. Main, Ph.
8100. )30M
PERSONAL
U & M CLEANERS and Laundry. Shirts
18c ea., Laundry 7 lbs. for 56c. 1 day
service no extra. 1306 So. Uni. )22P
WHY DREAM of the African Queen
when there's a special on Esquire-
$4 (reg. $6)? Student Periodical, 6007.
)1P
ATTENTION P-BELL CROWD-Of age
females seek company at. said site.
The Fox-4061 Stockwell. )35P
SIGMA DELTA TAU proudly announces
that all its ACTIVES have dates for
I.F.C. Weekend. )34P

X

,

READ
and

f

USE

Daily
Classifieds

1I.

TONIGHT
BOB LEOPOLD
and his Ann Arbor Alley Cats
' DAN IN

PLUS
BEVERLY MICHAELS
H UGO HAAS
in
"THE GIRL
ON THE
BRIDGE"
STEEL TOWN at 6:50 - 9:30
GIRL ON BRIDGE at 8:00 only

Broadcast at 11 :00
Friday" and Saturday Nights
Members
. and Guests
CLUB SPh. 2-3972
RENTALS & BANQUETS

I authorities.

Mats
Price 37c
Tax 7c
Total 44c

i- Gp

Nights
Price 54c
Tax 11c
Total 65c

with
Sphinx and
CIN144IA GWILD) The Chinese
Student
Club
present
James Thurber end Elliott Nugent' s
4sTHE MALE
ANIMAL"
with

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

I's-TOTE-1

LAST TIMES TODAY
Humphrey Bogart - Katharfine Hepbu"h eAf I can Quee

O LU ALtY
Your Singing Host
HALL

L-

Now gNE l
NOrP
Ph. 56F

PRICES
WEEKDAYS EVE. & SUNDAY CHILDREN
37 & 7 Tax 44c to 5p.m. 54c & 11c Tax-65c 13c & 3c Tax -16c

I

Doors Open
12:45 P.M.

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

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