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April 25, 1952 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE EE

____________________________________________________________________________ I .~ U I m

awyers Start Hunt'
For Engineers' Rule
Annual Crease Ball To Start Campus Feud;
Past History of Dance Reveals Long Rivalry

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HELP!
Water

Safety

By JUDY GREENFELD
Suspense and excitement will be
running high on Friday, May 2,
when lawyers abandon heavy
books to stage their biggest dance
of the year, "Crease Ball," and
solve the "case of the hidden slide
rule."
On this night, law and engineer-
ing students will end another
chapter in the long historic rival-
ry between the two schools.
THIS RIVALRY, highlighted by
thp enthusiastic attempt of the
lawyers to discover and capture
the engineer's eight-foot slide rule
in time for Crease Ball, developed
on campus many years ago when
law classrooms were located in
Haven IHall,
Guarding one entrance to the
diag while the engineers held
down the fort at the opposite
end, the legal men would arouse
the anger of the "engine gang"
by parking a car in the middle
of the engineering arch and let-
ting the air out of the tires.
In revenge, the slide rule men
would form a human chain across
the arch to prevent the lawyers
from reaching their classrooms.
Thus began the friendly feud.
IN 1921, MEMBERS of the law
school stole the giant slide rule
which was to be the main decora-
tion of Slide Rule Ball.
Their anger thoroughly arous-
ed by then, the engineers retali-
ated by invading the scene of
Crease Ball with tear gas bombs
and succeeded in cutting the
power box current.
Each year the success of the
dance is measured by the appear-
ance or absence of the engineer's
prized slide rule.
LAST YEAR the attempt to take
the coveted possession away from

the members of the engineering
school resulted in complete victory
for the lawyers.
Two rules were triumphantly
carried to Crease Ball at 10:45
p.m. by the lawyers who display-
ed them like banners on wires
strung across the room.
One rule had been discovered
and removed from the Union at
noon of the day of the dance, while
the other was found in the gym-
nasium of the Intramural Build-
ing.
The slides were later returned
to the engineers with the purpose
of cementing an atmosphere of
friendly relations between the two
schools.
Foreign Affairs
Discussed In Tal1 k
By Prof Slosson
"Hesitation among fears," has
resulted in making our present
foreign policy one of negative con-
tainment Prof. Preston Slosson
said last night at a meeting of the
BEACON Association.
"In the days before World War
I geographical good fortune and
the consequental lack of interest
in European politics made it pos-
sible for America to go without a
definite foreign policy," Slosson
stated.
"However," he continued, "the
three great disasters" of our gen-
eration has made it necessary that
the United States adopt a for-
midable foreign policy following
World War II.
Weeare now waging a defensive
holding action in Asia and build-
ing our defenses in western Eur-
ope, but in view of the present
uneasy world situation we dare not
do much more, nor much less than
we already are doing in the trou-
ble spots of the world, Prof. Slos-
son concluded.

Course Opens
For Students
The American Red Cross is spon-
soring its annual water safety in-
structor course for University stu-
dents starting Monday from 7 to
10 p.m. in the Intramural Pool.
Students eligible for the course
must be at least 18 years old and
hold a current senior life saving
certificate.
The course is open to both men
and women. Women may register
with Miss Gareis in Barbour Gym
and men may register at the In-
tramural Pool with William John-
son.
The class extends over a two
week period and students must
spend 15 hours in class to receive
the certificate.
For the first week, the class
usually meets three nights for
three hours each and two nights
of three hours each the second
week.
The instructor for the course
will be James H. Hamilton, from
Texas. Mr. Hamilton is a first aid,

On tA010 I
With most of the attention fo-
cused on Michigras activities this
weekend, only a few parties appear
on the social agenda.
Gay spring formals will be pro-
minent at the Alpha Sigma Phi
dinner and pledge formal tonight.
Couples will dance to the music
of Bob Elliott's orchestra in the
VFW.
Bill Klein and his band will play
at the Delta Sigma Delta pledge
formal.
Optimistically predicting clear
skies and sunshine for Saturday,
Anderson House of East Quad has
slated a picnic to be held at the
fresh air camp.
Lloyd House of West Quad will
give a picnic at the Island. Boat-
ing, baseball, and suppers will
highlight the day's activities.

Center Starts
Date Bureau
The International Center has es-
tablished a date bureau for women
interested in securing a date for
the 10th annual International Ball
on May 16.
The coeds will be fixed up for
a coke date before the dance to
meet their prospective escorts.
Women who are interested may
sign up at the International Cen-
ter in the Union.
Two years ago the International
Students' Association initiated the
date bureau in an attempt to "de-
fy the overpowering ratio of men
to women on the campus."
The bureau has been successful
in the past and Center officials
hope that its success will continue.
Mary Kui is serving as chairman
of the committee.

SUSAN GIFFIN
* * *

*

Giffin - Biggs
At Sunday dinner at the Alpha
Chi Omega house, announcement
was made of the engagement of
Susan M. Giffin, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. J. E. Giffin of Fort
Wayne, Ind., to Robert D. Biggs,
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Biggs
of Wichita Falls, Tex.
A junior in the literary college,
Miss Giffin is affiliated with Al-
pha Chi Omega sorority. During
the past year, she served as a Pan-
hellenic rushing counselor.
Mr. Biggs is affiliated with Delta
Upsilon fraternity and Tau Beta
Pi and Sigma Xi, honorary engi-
neering organizations. Now en-
rolled in the Rackham School of
Graduate Studies, he received his
degree of Bachelor of Chemical
Engineering in 1950 from Rice In-
stitute.
The couple is planning an Au-
gust wedding.
Austin - Rose
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Austin of
St. Louis, Mo., announce the mar-
riage of their daughter, Mary, to
Hugh Rose, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Howard G. Rose of Hinsdale, Ill.
Mr. and Mrsr Rose are graduate
students, and Mr. Rose is a mem-
ber of Acacia Fraternity.
The wedding was held on April
18.
Newman Club
Newman Club will hold an
open house at 8:30 p.m. tonight
in the Club Rooms at E. Wil-
liams and Thompson Streets.
Dancing will be the featured
entertainment during the eve-
ning.

MARY C. NUSSBAUM
* * *
Nussbaum - Stinson
The engagement of Mary Caro-
lyne Nussbaum to Kaye W. Stin-
son, son of Mr. and Mrs. William
Stinson of Grand Rapids was an-
nounced by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Weldon Nussbaum of Cape
Girardeau, Miss.
Miss Nussbaum is a French ma-
jor in the literary college and is
to be a June graduate. She is a
member of Delta Delta Delta So-
rority.
Mr. Stinson is a senior in the
School of Business Administration
and is affiliated with Phi Delta
Theta Fraternity.
* * *

JAMES HAMILTON
4' * *
water safety and accident preven-
tion field representative in Texas
for the Red Cross.
He joined the organization's na-
tional staff in 1944 and has served
on disaster committees, has head-
ed first aid programs and water
safety programs in his area.
Under the present assignment
from the Red Cross Midwestern
Area Office, Mr. Hamilton is re-
sponsible for organizing and con-
ducting instructor courses in first
aid, water safety and accident pre-
vention.

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President of League Has Busy Job;
Other Officers Have Many Duties

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STAR
CLEAN ERS
1213 South University
3
for the price of
Dry Cleaning
Safe

I

578 women from
224 colleges taking!
secretarial training
at Gibbs
Special Course for College Women.
Five-city personal placement service.
write College Dean for catalog.
KATHARINE GIBB S
BOSTON 16, 90 Marlborough St. NEW YORK 17, 230 Park Ave.
HICAGO 11, 51 E. Superior St. MONTCLAIR, 33 Plymouth St
PROVIDENCE 6. R. 1., 155 Angell St.
i*

l

ISRAEL
Independence Day
CELEBRATION

EVELYN WILCOX
* * *
Wilcox - Hyde
The engagement of their daugh-
ter, Evelyn Adoir, to Frank Cal-
vin Hyde Jr. was announced by
Dr. and Mrs. Rex A. Wilcox of
Alma.
Mr. Hyde is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Hyde of Riverdale, and
a graduate of the General Motors
Institute in Flint. He is presently
employed in the service depart-
ment of the Oldsmobile Corp. in
Lansing.
Miss Wilcox is a junior in the
School of Nursing.
June 28, is the date set for the
wedding.
WAA
There will be no meeting of
the WAA Softball Club this
week. The next meeting will be
at 4 p.m., Friday in the WAB.

When the new president of the
League takes the gavel from pre-
sent League president, Cathy So-
tir, on installation night at 7:30
p.m., Monday, she will begin a
busy year of activity.
Her main job will be to co-ordi-
nate all the offices and commit-
tees into a functional, working
body, which will be a voice of every
coed enrolled in the University.
She will act as the ex-officio
chairman of the Women's League
Council and preside at all meetings
of this council.
The chairmanships of the Exe-
cutive Board of the League, of the
Ethel A. McCormick Scholarship
Committee and of the Board of
Representatives in the absence of
the chairman of the Board of Rep-
resentatives will also be held by
the League president.
She will be, too, non-voting vice-
chairman of the Board of Gover-
nors of the League and a member
of the Student Affairs Committee,
on which she will help to formu-
late and approve plans for student
affairs.
All these activities will perhaps
make the new League president one
of the busiest women on campus.
However, the other executive of-
ficers of the League will also have
many duties to fulfill.
The vice-president must be able
to step in whenever and wherever
she is needed. She will serve on
the committee of the Fresh Air
Camp and be a member of the
Executive Board, the Board of
Representatives, the Board of Gov-
ernors and the Ethel A. McCor-
m i c k Scholarship Committee.
League librarian will also occupy
a place on her list of activities.
Writer's cramp will be the great
est occupational hazard of the
Q IMPORTED
J EWELRYI
INDIA PRINTS
SILK SCARFS 0
SWEETS FROM
HOLLAND
INDIA ART SHOP t
330 Maynard St.
v > < 4-0 -- 0 - 0< > <

Drug stores have developed, have
expanded, far beyond what any.
one could imagine in the days
when they were merely "apothe.
cary shops." The apothecary shop
- now the prescription depart.
ment of the modern drug store -
has itself developed enormously
with the growth of medical and
pharm aceutical knowledge. But
down through the years its em-
blematic mortar and pestle re-
maintto symbolize the devotion
of the profession of pharmacy to
maintaining and improving health.
When next your physician gives
you a prescription ...,bring it to

li

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217 South Main 9 Nickels Arc

League secretary. She will take
minutes at meetings of the Wo-
men's League Council, the Board
of Representatives and the Board
of Governors as well as handling
correspondence for these commit-
tees and for any special projects
that will be carried out by the
various League activities.
Each of the chairmen of the
many League activities must come
in contact with the "financial wiz-
ard," the treasurer.
All of the budgets for the vari-
ous committees will be compiled by
the treasurer in the Fall and sub-
mitted to the League Council for
approval.

BEFORE & AFTER
Reading
Michigan Daily
Class if ieds
The boy and girl finding their name
in the classified section of The Daily
each day will receive one free movic
ticket.
Tickets should be picked up at the
Daily the week your name appears.

MAYBE YOU ARE DREAMING
{i OF LILAC TIME ...
with warm breezes, flowers in bloom, cotton
skirts and blouses, no coats. Doesn't it
sound wonderful? (We have the cotton v
skirts from $7.95 and a lot of other things
for background to the Spring.)
ANN OWENS
500 E. Liberty Phone 3-8781
I ~e oacsoc..s-5<c c=0....o .....o.,..li

APRIL 27

I

ade

Speaker: Prof. P. Slosson
FILM ON ISRAEL
LEAGUE BALLROOM
7;30

11

WELCOME
MICHIGRAS VISITORS

YOURRMACIST
At
Swift's Drug Store
340 S. State Street
Phone 2-0534
DELIVERY SERVICE

as'
Y*/

$795
as sketched

Be sure to visit

The Office Equipment Co.
215 E. Liberty St.
for those unusual gifts to take home

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11

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NEW OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCES ON
COLUM IASL CORns
MUSIC FOR THE ORGAN (Bach) - E. Power Biggs
DRAMATIC SCENES FROM FRENCH and RUSSIAN OPERAS - George London
THE MONTHS-SYMPHONIC SUITE (Tchaikovsky) - Morton Gould and Orch.
CUBAN OVERTURE; PORGY and BESS SUITE (Gershwin)-Andre Kostelanetz
PIANO CONCERTI BY GRIEG AND SCHUMANN - Dinu Lipatti and Orchestra
Mahler's SYMPHONY NO. 8 IN E MINOR "Symphony of a Thousand"
Three Choral Groups, Soloists, Vienna Symphony led by H. Schercheng

w

111

I

"r,
} ;y.
..

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4 SentmoenrtaL4

I1

You will find your favorites on

Columbia Long Playing Records at either of our conveniently located stores,
Stop in and let us help you in your choice.

x

Others at
8.95 and up

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