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April 04, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F'R'IDAY, APRIL '4, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1952 PAGE THREE

I

ii

Track,

Golf

Squads

Head

for

Dixie

CLASSIFIEDS

i

Southern, Arkansas Relays
Lure Wolverine Cindermen
Trip To Give Canham's Charges First Taste
Of Outdoor Work; 20 Make Spring Journey

NCAA Rules Committee 'M' Linksmen
Lifts Basketball's Face Face Three

Three Important Revisions Put Through;
Tournament Experiment Inspires Changes

Michigan trackmen joined the
mass exodus of their fellow stu-
dents yesterday morning when
their auto caravan departed for
Alabama and a week's stay in the
deep South.
Unlike their colleagues, how-
ever, the trip will be more than a
pleasure outing for Coach Don
Canham's charges. Tomorrow they
will perform in the annual'South-
ern Relays in Birmingham, Ala-
bama.
'4 * * *
THE FOLLOWING Saturday
the cinder warriors will journey to
the Ozark country to partake of
the Arkansas Relays festivities.
Unless Michigan weather follows
them, the -trip will provide the
thinclads with their first taste of
outdoor work.
A select group of 10 perform-
ers will bear the Maize and Blue
colors in five events in the
Southern Relays. Milt Mead is
entered in the high jump, while
Fritz Nilsson is scheduled to ap-
pear in both the shot and discus
events.
The other Wolverine entries are
team events. Jack Carroll, Bill
Hickman, John Ross and Don Mc-
Ewen have their eyes on the dis-
4Accident Kills
Uloutterman Kin!
CLEVELAND, Tenn.-(0)-The
life of baseball player Art Hout-
teman was rocked by a tragic
automobile accident for the sec-
ond time when his only child was
killed near here yesterday.
Cheryl Lynne, 7 - month - old
daughter of the Detroit Tiger star,
was thrown to earth when a large,
new (Cadillac) automobile plung-
ed from a highway 16 miles north
of here.

tance medley record set by Michi-
gan in 1950.
IN THE MILE relay Al Rankin
will leadoff, followed by Dan
Hickman, Bill Konrad and anchor
man Carroll. Eight other schools
will compete with Michigan, in-
cluding Yale, MSC, Alabama, Ken-
tucky, Tennessee, Emory, Florida
and Tulane.
On Monday the Alabama 10
will be joined by a like number
of their teammates in Arkansas
to prepare for the following Sat-
urday's meet, in which Michigan
is entered in 12 events.
Individual performers will be
Mead, who will go in the high
jump again, vaulter Roger Maugh,
Bruins Triumph
MONTREAL - (R) - Rookie
Jack McIntyre scored in the
third period last night to give
the underdog Boston Bruins a
1-0 victory over the Montreal
Canadiens and the upper hand
in their semi-final Stanley Cup
playoff. The triumph was Bos-
ton's third straight and they
now enjoy a lead of three games
to two.
and Van Bruner, the high hurd-
ler. Nilsson and Roy Pella will
perform in both the shot and dis-
cus, while Junior Stielstra will do
the broad jumping.
THE WOLVERINES have three
entrants, Konrad, Ross Coates
and John Vallortigara, in the 100
yard dash, and two freshmen, Jeff
Dooley and John Moule, are posted
in the mile run.
Bill Barton will replace Car-
roll on the distance medley
team, while Bob Rudisell will
take over Rankin's place on the
Alabama mile relay squad which
will be entered in the 880 at
Arkansas.
An all-freshman team of Rudi-
sell, Stielstra, Vallortigara, and
Coates will represent Michigan in
the 440 yard relay. The Wolver-
ines' remaining relay team, the
two mile, will consist of Dooley,
Bill Hickman, McEwen and either
Ross or Moule as the fourth parti-
cipant.
- - -
The complete track schedule:
April
S-Southern Relays, at Birmingham
12-Arkansas Relays, at Fayettville
19-Ohio Relays, at Columbus
25-26-Penn Relays, at Philadelphia
May
10 -Illinois, at Champaign
17-Iowa-Northwestern, at Evanston
24-Notre Dame, here
30-31-Big Ten, here
June
13-NCAA, Berkley
TODAY ONLY
Continuous from 12:15 P.M.

f
f
f
i

MIKE SCHWARTZ
. . . net co-captain
* * *

Bi Mike' Big
Tennis Asset
Schwartz Due to Fill
Key Post on Squad
By HOWARD ROBINSON
This is Mike Schwartz's senior
year and both he and tennis
Coach Bill Murphy have expecta-
tions of it being his' best.
Schwartz, a powerful six-footer,
is slated to play the number two
singles position and either num-
ber one or two doubles on this
year's edition of the Wolverine
net squad.
CO-CAPTAIN SCHWARTZ has
a year of varsity experience be-
hind him - a year which saw him
go all the way to the Big Ten
doubles finals with his partner,
Jack Smart.
Big Mike wasn't satisfied to
sit back and rest on past laurels,
however. He's been practicing
indoors at the Sports Building
in his spare time all winter.
His improvement has been rapid
and Schwartz now regularly con-
quers his teammates in practice
sessions.
HAILING FROM Mt. Clemens,
Michigan, Schwartz came to Ann
Arbor with an impressive record
already behind him. He started
playing tennis in the ninth grade
and before graduation from high
school, he was captain of his
school team for two years and a
finalist in the Class A High School
Regional Tournament.
However, compared to his
present game, Schwartz con-
siders his high school play
"nothing". Always a strong
stroker, he relied on this almost
completely and neglected the
scientific side of the game which
is necessary for a winner.
He attributes all of the net
know-how he has developed and
his success to Murphy who, he
says, "taught me all I know".
Schwartz has become a strong net
player and has a cannon-ball
service to go along with his other
abilities.
Looking ahead to next fall,,
Schwartz hopes to attend law
school here at Michigan.
EXHIBITIONdBASEBALL RESULTS
Braves 5, Dodgers 4
Cubs 10, Pirates 5n
White Six 2, Browns 1
Reds 5, Senators 1
Phillies 4, Cardinals 3
Red Sox 1, Dallas (Texas League) 1
Called at end of 5th-rain
Athletics 6, Columbia (Southern
Association 4
Giants vs. Indians cancelled-wet
grounds1

By DICK LEWIS
Not content with the brand of
play that drew more basketball
fans than ever before in 1952, the
national hoop moguls have made a
flock of rule changes which seem
sure to slow up the already too
slow hoop sport.
Every year about the time of
the NCAA playoffs, the national
basketball committee meets for
the express purpose of submitting
to the petty grievances of the dis-
gruntled "name" coaches.
THE RULES COMMITTEE ef-
fected three major changes fol-
lowing an experiment in the con-
solation round of the NCAA
tourney which saw Illinois turn
back Santa Clara, 67-64.
In this contest, all foul shots
had to be taken, a second shot
was awarded when the first free
throw was missed on any foul
up to the final three minutes,
and in those final 180 seconds,
every foul was considered in-
tentional and worth two charity
tosses.
These new regulations were
adopted en toto by the committee
which met recently in Seattle. But
the clamor that went up with
their institution is still echoing.

.S

TODAY and SATURDAY
BOB
M MM-
HOER
1 W
'AMAR

John Palmer,
Gafford Pa ce
Masters Field.
Tie for Lead with 69;
Eight Others Fire 71
AUGUSTA--(P)-Ray Gafford, a
tall, thin Texan, who plays in
comparatively few tournaments,
and Johnny Palmer, the pudgy
North Carolinian who plugs along
but seldom wins, shot out in front
yesterday in the opening round of
the "Mystery" Masters Golf Tour-
nament.
They shot scores of 34-35-69
over the long, treacherous Augusta
National course to take a one
stroke lead over three of the rank-
ing favorites, defending champion
Ben Hogan, Sammy Snead and Al
Besselink.
Although the golfers weren't
bothered on a day of low scoring,
the 16th Masters Tournament
drew the "Mystery" tag in the
press tent because of a strike of
Western Union telegraphers. This
hampered the efforts of a big corps
of writers in getting out the news
of the tournament.
It still was anybody's tourna-
ment as the opening round result-
ed in a mass attack on Augusta
National's par of 36-36-72 for
the tortuous 6,950 yards.
Still very much in the running
at the end of the first round were
eight players who had 71's and
nine more with even par 72's.
The first group included such
tournament - tested players as
Johnny Revolta of Evanston, Ill.,
Lloyd Mangrum of Chicago, Lew
Worsham of Oakmont, Pa., and
Skip Alexander of St. Petersburg,
Fla. Less experienced but just as
dangerous were Fred Hawkins of
El Paso, Tex., Doug Ford of Har-
rison, N.Y., Tommy Bolt of Dur-
ham, N.C., and Joe Kirkwood Jr.,
of Grossinger, N.Y.

MOST DISGRUNTLED of all is
Santa Clara mentor Bob Feerick.
The usually mild-manered Cali-
fornian claims that the consola-
tion "experiment" lost the contest
for his Broncos.
Another change adopted re-
moves the penalty of disallowing
any points scored when a player
touches his own basket while a
shot is being attempted.
THIS WASONE of the oldest
rules in the book, dating back to
the days when baskets were at the
It's Rovner Again
Defending champion Jerry
Rovner came from behind last
night to retain his Intramural
indoor singles tennis crown, de-
feating Jay Millman bya score
of 2-6, 6-3, 6-1.
Rovner made a stunning
comeback after Millman, play-
ing almost flawless tennis, had
moved out in front in the first
set.
end of long rods and players could
jump up to shake the hoop as the
ball bounced on the rim.
In the 1952-53 campaign, some
more interesting additions will
be tried out by court squads
around the country.
One is a proposal by Los An-
geles State coach Sax Elliot
which would give victory to the
first team hitting 64 points. This
novelty was suggested to elimi-
nate last-quarter stalling and
fouling.
Elliot's plan was put into ac-
tion last week when LA State de-
feated the College All-Stars, 64-
62. The game lasted 44 minutes
and 16 seconds and there was only
one personal in the last three min-
utes.
Other moves under considera-
tion include changing the five
personal-and-out rule to three in
each half, and disallowing a play-
er to hold the ball for more than
five seconds.
Spartan Nine
Wins Eighth
RALEIGH, N.C.-(P)-Michigan
State College's ace southpaw, Don
Quayle, went the full nine inn-
ings yesterday in pitching Michi-
gan State to a 7-3 victory over
North Carolina State.
The junior from Oxford, Mich.,
also contributed a homer in the
fifth inning. The Spartans have
won eight and lost three games on
their trip which will close today
with a game at Durham, N.CQ,
against Duke.

Strong Foes
Seven Men Make
Pre-Season Trip
Michigan's 1952 golfers leave for
North Carolina today to open
their season against three south-
ern opponents next week.
Seven Wolverine golfers will
make the trip South, where they
will meet Wake Forest at Wake
Forest on Monday. North Caro-
lina at Chapel Hill on Wednes-
day, and Duke the next day at
Durham.
COACH BERT KATZENMEYER
is taking Captain Dean Lind,
lettermen Dick Evans, Lowell Le-
Claire, John Fraser, and Hugh
Wright, and sophomores Russ
Johnson and Bud Jones with him
on the spring tour. The Michigan
coach expects to alternate the
latter two in the three meets.
This will mark the Wolver-
ines' sixth southern trip since
the War. It has been used pri-
marily as a tune-up for the
later Big Ten opposition in late
April and May.
In years past the Michigan
golfers have not fared particularly
well against the Southerners. Last
year the Wolverines opened by
downing Wake Forest, 17-7, but
then lost to North Carolina, 15-
12, and Duke, 23-4.
* * *
AN IMPORTANT FACTOR in
the superiority,, of the southern
colleges over the Wolverines is
their earlier starting date. The'
golf season gets underway for the
southern schools midway through
March after several weeks of out-
door practice.
In contrast the Michigan
linksmen are confined indoors
for the greater portion of their
March practice, and open their
competitive season against the
southern colleges. The Wolver-
ines have been able to get out
for several rounds on the Uni-
versity course this spring, how-
ever.
Once again Duke promises to
provide the Wolverines with their
stiffest competition.dThe Blue
Devils, who are defending South-
ern Conference champions, have
lost only one man from their 1951
team.
All of the matches on the trip
will be played in the afternoon
on an 18-hole basis. Both the
singles and doubles will be played
at the same time, with the scores
computed on the basis of the one
18-hole round.
The combining of the singles
and doubles matches will give the
Michigan golfers an opportunity
to spend the morning in valuable
practice sessions.

MISCELLANEOUS

SPECIAL-on Poodle Permanents, com-
plete - $5.00. Modern Beauty Shop,
1171 S. Main, Ph. 8100. )20M
SHIRTS LAUNDERED-18c each. 1 day
service, no extra charge. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )23M
APPLICATION PHOTOS-3 day service.
Wed. and Sat. hours 10-4. Palmer
Studio, Michigan Theater Building.
)21M
USE OUR 'little' ads for Big' results.
Far-fetched? No-there's humor, in-
terest, excitement, and Big news in
the little ads you find in the classi-
fled section of the Daily. )27M

and
USE
Daily
Classifieds

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gold Elgin pocket watch Thurs.
on Washtenaw. Reward. Ph. 6295.
)36L
LOST-Gold Helbros watch, 2116 N.S.
Phone 5740. Reward. )39L
LOST AT TRACK MEET-Bulova watch
with gold band. Initials D.A.Y. Find-
er please notify David Yates, 806
Hill, 8612. )40L
FOR SALE
Your Official UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN RING is waiting ,
for you - NOW - at
Burr Patt's, 1209 S. Univ. ) 58
GABARDINE PANTS $5.49-$7.50 value.
Colors: brown, blue, green, grey-ad
vertised in Life. Sam's Store, 122 E.
WASH. Ph. 3-8611. )50
ENCYCLOPEDIA AMERICANA, 30 vol-
umes, in good condition. 1943 edition.
$30. Cost new $200. Call Louis Less-
ner 9066-Sat. only. )73
,48 OLDS, club coupe, 8-cyl. hyd. R.H.,
34,500 M. $945. 5821 after 6:00 p.m. )74
1936 FORD coupe. Good condition. Radio
& heater. Ph. 3-1988 after 5:15. )75

PERSONAL

AT LAST
Laundry service you wanted. 7 lbs.
for 56c. 1 day service. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )12P
MAGAZINES -Special student-faculty
rates-phone 6007 and charge your
order -monthly specials - gift cards
mailed-Student Periodical. )21P
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironin eparately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )6B

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Reasonable Rates. Accurate
& Efficient. Ph'one 7590. 830 So. Main.
)1B
TYPEWRITER & Fountain -Pen repair
work a specialty. Typewriters, Adding
Machines and W/C Tape and Wire
Recorders. Morrill's, 314 S. State St.
)9B
FOR RENT
APT. HUNTING? - Try Apt. Finding
Service at the Campus Tourist Home.
Rooms oy day or week. Kitcuien Pniv.
518 E. William St., 3-8454. )5R
LARGE, LIGHT, first floor double -
Hollywood bed. private entrance,
kitchen privileges if decited. Also
small basement room in exchange for
caretaking. 1019 Church St. Phone
6876 evenings. )16F
TRANSPORTATION
GET HOME the cheap way. Advertise
for a ride. )9T
ST. LOUIS, Oklahoma City, Amarillo,
Texas, Tucson, Ariz. Leaving April 9.
Need riders. Call 7856. )18T
WOULD LIKE RIDE to Boston or vicin-
ity. Can leave Thursday noon or
Friday. Return April 14. Ph. 5056. )20T
ROOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM, reduced rates. Phone
27044. )22R

READ

FINAL WEEK
Rocket to the Moon
By Odets
ARTS THEATER CLUB
April 14 through April 27 - "OTHELLO"
Reservations can be made now.

«I

s: ~
SUVAN-MO&.ZARCNES
at 6:35, PLUS
S9:35
Starring
ramp FRIEND
Charles COBURN
/anda HENDRIX
ALLIED ARTISTS PRODUCTION
- At 8:00 ONLY
ADVENTURE OFTIM ALL!

r.

I

PRICES
FOR THIS PICTURE
Matinee to 5..........74c
Evenings . .......95c
Children .......5 0r
Robert TAYLOR - Deborah KERR
STARTS SATURDAY
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Matinee to 5-44c
Eve. & Sun. 65c-Child 16c

I

White is Right!

TODAY - SATURDAY - SUNDAY
When originally released this
film was described as being
"the screen's classic of terror!"
"Phantom of
the Opera!"
IN TECHNICOLOR

orPINUMp

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinemo Triumphs
From All Nations

Mail'this coupon fQr your copy of
"We Charge Genocide"
THE HISTORIC PETITION TO THE U.N.
To: Civil Rights Congress
1442 Griswold Street, Detroit 26, Mich.
Name

Nelson Eddy
Claude

Sussana Poster
Rains

,I

Address

City

When the Chips Were
Down a Bunch of
Husky Guys
Took OverfA

Enclose $1.10 per copy, postage included.

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i

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Ending
TODAY

44c until 5 P.M.
65c after 5

WI NTHROP'S

MINIATURES
"Out On A Limb" "Slamming j "Life in
Disney Whimsy Sammy Snead" I The Andies"
Our best wishes to everyone
for a happy and carefree holiday.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN~
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY
presents
d "PRINCESS IDA"
I at

HUMPHREY KATHARIN
BO~li"HEPBURN
al
TEfCNNICOLOR y

1I

'a a

i

"SILVER CITY"
In Technicolor
with

0

F ,
du

EDMUND O'BRIEN

YVONNE DeCARLO

I

Starting Sunday
GROUCHO MARX MARIE WILSON
WILLIAM BENDIX

The pacemaker for summer
in style, comfort and value.
Come in. We have a wide selec-

s. ..;:':' r,

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=4 5Aa.§

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