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April 04, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FMAT, APRIL 4= 1952

PAGE FOUR FRIDAY, APRIL 4,1952
_______________________________________ I _______________________________________ I

SL Relaxes
After Hectic
Campaigning
(Continued from page 1)
the small number of candidates,
was made up by SL's conducting
a strict triple check of all count-
ing procedure.
* * *
THERE WERE several instances
of large transfers of votes from
a dropped candidate to another
one still in the running. Largest
of these came when Pete
Lardner, '53E, dropped and trans-
erred 58 votes to Robin Glover,
'53. Second largest transfer came
when 40 votes went from Charles
Gilbert to Janet Alarie.
Both Miss Glover and Miss
Alarie vigorously denied that the
transfers were results of any
deliberate block voting. Miss
Alarie said that she had cam-
paigned for Gilbert but that no
inter-house arrangements had
been made.
Election disputes were at a
minimum, but Men's Judiciary
Council was forced to invalidate
273 SL ballots due to improper
marking. Write-in candidates were
also sparse.
One ballot for the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Ath-
letics showed a write-in vote for
one Dwight D. Eisenhower, but he
received no credit for it.
G&S To Give
'Princess Ida'
Presented by the Gilbert and
Sullivan Society, "Princess Ida"
will open April 16 and run through
April19 at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Tickets for the operetta will go
on sale April 14 at the Lydia Men-
delssohn box office. Prices are 60
and 90 cents for the Wednesday
and Thursday performances and
90 cents and $1.20 for Friday and
Saturday night.
Taking as its theme, "Men are
nature's sole mistake," the oper-
etta is a satire on women's at-
tempt to become man's equal.
Student director, Jim Ueber-
horst, '52L, said the operetta is
"the most difficult production the
society has attempted, but it con-
tains the best music ever written
by the team."
Hosteling Awards
Open to Cyclists
Five all expense scholarship
trips will be awarded to writers of
the best essays on "Why I Would
Like To Go Hosteling In Amer-
ica," Justin J. Cline, Michigan
grad and Executive Director of
American Youth Hostels, has an-
nounced.
Alternate cash prizes may be
elected by winners.
All entries must be no more
than 1,000 words and must be
postmarked no later than April 15.
Full information and application
forms may be obtained from Na-
tional Headquarters, American
Youth Hostels, Inc., 6 E. 39th St.,
New York 16, N. Y.

Gargoyle's New Blood

Nation Faces
Big Industry
Walkouts
(Continued from page 1)
The industry contends it would
need a $12-a-ton increase in the
price of steel to meet the WSB
proposals. The government has
refused to relax price controls that
would limit an increase to slightly
more than $2 a ton.
* * *
ALSO IN New York Western
Union said it has resumed service
in 39 of the key cities hit early
yesterday by the first nation-wide
telegraph strike since 1919, but
the strikers still called the walkout
100 per cent effective.
The striking AFL Commercial
Telegraphers Union said some
31,000 Western Union employes
walked off the job just one min-
ute after midnight in the climax
to a wage dispute.
The CTU said Western Union's
telegraph business had been cut
"to a dribble."
DETROIT became the focal
point yesterday in the threatened
big telephone strike.
The CIO Telephone Workers'
Union summoned its top lead-
ership from around the nation
to an "emergency meeting."
The CIO's Communication work-
ers of America plan to call out
approximately 40,000 Bell System
employes, including 18,000 in
Michigan.
A spokesman for Michigan Bell
said the company had no com-
ment.
Representatives of the company
and the union are expected to re-
sume bargaining negotiations to-
day.
WATCH
REPAIRING
ALL MAKES
at
JIALLERS
NEIL F. JONES
Giaduate of
Elgin Watch College

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-Daily-Bruce Knoll
HEAVE HO, MY LASS-Peg Nimz, '53, has-been editor of the Gargoyle, gets good bye shove from
new managing editor Don Malcolm, '53, as he cleans out the Garg office for the incoming crew of
editors.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
April 8-Unreality
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room i$ open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship Service, Sanctuary.
"The Sin of Impatience," Dr. Large preaching.
New members will be received during the
morning worship service.
Easter Sunday, April 13, 1952.
Two Identical Services:
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
Special Music, Dr. Large preaching.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily!
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Director Student Work, H. L. Pickerill, Mari-
lynn Paterson
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School, Junior High -Adults.
10:45 A.M.: Church School, Nursery to 6th Grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship
Sermon: "Royalty in Disguise.
5:00 P.M. Lenten Vespers. Music program by
the choir, Howard Forrar, Director.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Wdshtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veduin.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Ca.therine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Palm Sunday
8:00 & 9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M.: Blessing of Palms, Procession, Holy
Communion and Sermon.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer and The
Litany in Procession.
Holy Week
Monday through Maundy Thursday, Holy Com-
munion at 7:00 & 10:15 A.M. (and at 8:00
P.M. Maundy Thursday); Evening Prayer daily
through Easter Even (except Good Friday) at
5:15 P.M. in Chapel; Good Friday Three-Hour
Service 12:00-3:00 and Choral Evening Prayer
and Meditations at 8:00 P.M.; Church School
Services, Wed. and Good Friday at 4:00 P.M.;
Holy Baptism on Easter Even at 4:00 P.M.
Easter Day
7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion
(St. Andrew's Choir).
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon
(Schola Cantorum).
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon
(St. Andrew's Choir).
5:00 P.M.: Church School Festival Service
(Girls Choir).

Campus
Calendar
Events Today
FOREMEN - More than 1,000
foremen are expected to attend the
13th annual Foreman's Conference
to be held today and tomorrow at
the Rackham Building.,
* * *
Coming Events
TV HOUR - Senator Homer
Ferguson (R.-Mich.) will discuss
"Political Parties and Foreign
Policy" in a special interview fea-
ture of the University Television
Hour at 1 p. m. Sunday on WWJ-
TV.
COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS -
A special four week seminar course
in comparative religion will be
conducted at Lane Hall beginning
April 16. Entitled, "The Great Re-
ligions of the World," the course
will include discussions on Christ-
ianity, Judaism, Buddism, Hindu-
ism and Islamism.
Prof. William Alston, of the
philosophy department, will con-
duct the course.
BERKSHIRE AUDITIONS - A
committee from the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra will hold audi-
tions for instrumental applicants
to the Berkshire Music Center,
Tanglewood, Mass. at 1 p. m. April
21 in Hill Auditorium. Audition
appointments should be made in
advance with G. W. Rector, assist-
ant to the president of the Univer-
sity Musical Society In Burton
Tower.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

JUST U.S. SLUGS:
City Parking Meters Found
Free from Foreign Coins.

By JAN WINN
"Only good American money
has been collected from our park-
ing meters," Ann Arbor Traffic
Bureau chief, Roland Gainsley
claims.r
But in other cities, less scrup-
eulous. citizens have been slyly
Group Plans
'Cab' Service
The Michigras band wagon will
be embellished with hay to meet
students returning from spring
vacation on Easter Sunday.
A haywagon and traditional
team of work horses will be at the
New York Central system railroad
station to pick up the returning
vacationers and drive them to
their campus residences.
This service is being provided
free ' by the Michigras Publicity
committee, which will also see that
'students arriving at Willow Run
are welcomed with banners for
Michigras, according to Harvey
Howard, '53, publicity chairman.
Michigras festivities take place
two weeks after spring vacation,
on April 25 and 26.

slipping rare and foreign coins in-
to parking meters, according to a
study of parking meter collections
made by the Municipal Finance
Officers Association.
* * *
AMONG COINS found in New
York City's 10-cent parking me-
ters were a 10-kopek piece bearing
the Soviet hammer and sickle, sev-
eral 3-cent U. S. coins minted in
1867 and transit coins from va-
rious cities.
New York realizes a profit
on the tokens, since they were
redeemed at 15 cents each.
Detroit's nickel meters produced
Hong~ Kong 5-cent pieces, Phil-
ippine 25-cent pieces, French 10-
centimes, Mexican 5 centavos,
German coins, tool checks, bar
checks, and washers.
Hillel Passover
Reservations Due
Today is the deadline for reser-
vations for Passover meals to be
served at the new Hillel Bldg.
April 14, 15, 16 and 17, new Hillel
president Fred Kapetansky, '54,
has announced.
Reservations may be made at
Lane Hall.

s
...

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING QUICK RESULTS

U

DON'T BAT

YOUR BRAINS OUT!
for Beer, Wine, Soft Drinks
just drive through!

IT'S HERE!
The New Cushman
(Power " Acceleration A Speed ' Economy Comfort ' Loi Price
The sensational new loW-priced 1'AGLE has you mov-
ing at high speed within yards! Opens up to 50 miles
per hour out on the open road! Amazing fuel economy
-up to 85 miles to the gallon! Luxurious comfort-
big motor-bike saddle seat, special springing, balloon.
tires. Powerful 2-wheel brakes. Many extras. Yours
a price you can easily afford to pay.
USED MOTORBIKES. from $75.00
KIDDIE KORNER
Main and Madison ... Just Four Blocks from Campus

LET'S GIVE THIS NEW TAX THREAT
-
THISIS A DANGEROUS TAX GRAB!
Through City Charter Amendment number 5, the City seeks the power to impose a new tax on you. It will effect every man, woman
and child in Ann Arbor who goes to a movie, football, baseball or basketball game, boxing bout, wrestling match, plays, dances,
musical programs and other forms of entertainment and recreation where an admission is charged. You now pay a 20% federal
tax on these admissions. Now, the city proposes to levy a new, additional tax on these same admissions, THAT YOU WILL PAY.
COULD ANYTHIING BE MORE UNFAIR?
A NEW TAX THAT PLACES A DOUBLE BURDEN ON THE AVERAGE MAN AND HIS FAMILY!
DON'T GIVE UP T HE RIG HT TO CONT ROL TAXES!T
ONCE THE POWER TO LEVY AND COLLECT EXCISES IS VOTED, THE FOOT IS IN-THE-DOOR FOR MORE TAXES!
ECONOMY IS NEEDED - NOT NEW TAXES!
Don't be led to believe that this tax will come from visitors to the football games at the University. THE 'PEOPLE OF ANN
ARBOR WILL PAY THIS TAX. Suibstantial opinions by competent legal authorities is that the City cannot tax a State insti-
tution. You will be left holding he bag. Charter Amendment number 5 has nothing to do with the property tax. It will not
alter it one way or the other. It will only add a new tax to your already heavy tax burden. Aside from this, it would be a
mistake to tax our hospitality. Thousands are attracted here antually by our Hospitals, May Festival, Choral Union, Drama and
muia rgasadohe om fetranetn erainweea _dmisson is __rged _ou nw _ay a20fera

r,

114 E. William St.
Between Main and
Fourth Ave.
PHONE 7191 -
OPEN
Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.

HEAR THESE' JAZZ GREATS ON

RCA

VICTOR

LONG
PLATE'

RECORDS

MUGGSY .SPANIER FAVORITES
Sister Kate, Dinah, At Sundown,
Lonesome Road, Black and Blue, Etc.
BUNNY BERIGAN PLAYS
I Can't Get Started, Prisoner's Song,
Black Bottom, Trees, High $ociety, Etc.
ARMSTRONG TOWN HALL CONCERT
Pennies From Heaven, St. James Infirmary,
Rockin' Chair, Ain't Misbehavin', Etc. '

"FATS" WALLER FAVORITES
Honeysuckle Rose, It's A Sin, Blue Turning Gray,
Darktown Strutter's Ball, etc.
BENNY GOODMAN CLASSICS
Sing Sing Sing, King Porter Stomp,
One O'clock Jump, It Had To Be You, Etc.
LIONEL HAMPTON
Shoe Shiner's Drag, Don't Be That Way,
Sunny Side Of Street, Jivin' The Vibres, Etc.

4

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OTHERS BY
GLENN MILLER - EARL HINES - BILLY ECKSTINE - ELLINGTON

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SIII

YhTe Manternine qenare virunally "Musts" for th enmnrehensive Jazz Record Library - You will find them

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