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March 27, 1952 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-27

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71URSDAY, MARCH 27, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1952 PAGE THREE

MERMEN BATTLE AT PRINCETON:

1,

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NCAA

Swim Meet

To

Onen

oda

New Tartan Grain

OSU, Yale Favored to Win;
'M' Natators Vie for Third

Fine Record Oklahoma Wrestlers NCAA Choice
.yHERBCOHEN about by the inability of Lee to

11

By HERB NEIL
The two top swimming powers
in the country, Ohio State and
Yale, meet head-on this weekend
in the NCAA meet which gets
underway at Princeton, New
Jersey, with the 1500-meter race
tonight.
The Wolverines should battle
it out with Michigan State and
Princeton for third place in the
national meet.
John Davies and Stew Elliott,
Michigan co-captains, along with
Bumpy Jones, Don Hill, Tom
Benner, Rusty Carlisle, Wally
Jeffries, John Ries and Jim Wal-
ters will carry Michigan's hopes
into the meet.
The Wolverine contingent will
leave from the Willow Run air-
port at 9:00 this morning. No
Michigan man is entered in the
long 1500-meter grind tonight.
Yale and Ohio State are ex-
pected to battle it out for top
honors as they did last year when
Yale emerged the winner. It will
pit the Buckeyes' Ford Konno,
Dick Cleveland, Jack Taylor, and
diving 'contingent against Yale's
John Marshall, Wayne Moore,
Richard Thoman, and Kenneth
Welch,
A close battle and a new inter-
collegiate record may be in the
making tonight when the Buck-
eyes' Konno and the Elis' Marshall
clash. Konno is present holder of
the intercollegiate mark of 18:11.5
which he set at the Big Ten meet
three weeks ago.
Michigan's Davies will attempt
- to repeat his 100 and 200-yard1
Big Ten breaststroke victories in
the NCAA meet tomorrow and
Saturday. His chief competition
will come from Princeton's Bob
Brawner, who won both the races
in last year's NCAA meet. Davies
was forced to miss the meet last
year because of an eye infection.
* * *
Elliott, who was the leading
Wolverine performer in the NCAA
meet last year, finished third in
the 100-yard breaststroke and
sixth in the 200. The 200 will be
swum tomorrow night and the
100 on Saturday.

Michigan's medley star, Jones,
will again take on Indiana's
Larry Meyer, whom he barely
beat in the Big Ten champion-
ships, in the 150-yard individual
medley. In addition he faces a
fast man in Robert Mattson of
North Carolina State Saturday
night. Carlisle will also swim
the medley for the Wolverines.
The Wolverines' sprinter Hill
will swim the 50 tomorrow night,
and Benner will join him in the
* * *

'1W' Golfers
By HENLEY GURWIN
When the Wolverine golfers step
up to the first tee at Wake Forest
on April 7 for their first dual meet
of the year, they will take with
them an enviable record of golfing
achievements.
Since 1922, when Michigan first
began competing in golf, the Maize
and Blue have compiled eleven
Western Conference Champion-
ships, six of which have come
within the last ten years, and two
national championships.
* * *
FROM THE years 1922 through
1934, when they were crowned
champions at the National Inter-
collegiate Tournament at Cleve-
land, the Wolverine golfers com-
piled the amazing record of 66
wins, only eight losses and two
ties.
Again in 1935, Michigan won
the National Championship, de-
spite a loss to Northwestern in a
dual meet. It was the first loss
for the squad since 1932 when
Ohio State performed the feat.
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer, now!
starting his seventh year as golf
mentor, has led the linksmen to
Conference titles in 1946, 1947,
and 1949. Last year the squad
finished fourth behind Ohio State,
Purdue, and Wisconsin, on a rain-
soaked course at Evanston.
IN COMPETITION last season,'
the Wolverine sextet compiled an
eight won, five lost, one tied rec-
ord. This included the spring trip
to the South in which the Maize
and Blue were victorious over only
Wake Forest. North Carolina eked
out a narrow victory and Duke
trounced them, 23-4.
In Big Ten action, Michigan
defeated Ohio State and Mich-
igan State twice, won decisions
over Indiana and Illinois, split
a pair of matches with Purdue,
and tied the Wildcats of North-
western.

When the NCAA wrestling meet
opens at Fort Collins, Colorado
tomorrow, Oklahoma's defending
national champions will be favored
to walk off with top laurels once
more.
The Sooners, who are coached by
a former Michigan grappler, are
expected to lead all the teams by
virtue of their fine season's record.
* * *
AMONG OTHER important vic-
tories they have defeated Okla-
homa A&M by a very decisive
Bulletin
CHICAGO-(P)-Chuck Da-
vey, scholarly southpaw from
Michigan State College, last
night zoomed to the top flight
among welterweights, by scor-
ing a technical knockout over
Ike Williams, former world's
lightweight champion, in 1:47
of the fifth round.
The scheduled 10-round bat-
tle was halted by referee Wil-
liam Doty with Williams stag-
gering and unable to defend}
himself under Davey's relent-
less two-fisted attack. Williams
was on the verge of crashing to
the floor of the rink when ref-
eree Doty waved Davey to his
corner as the winner.
score; and the Aggies are regarded
as second choices behind only
Oklahoma.
Michigan which has a chance
to take home top laurels in two
weight categories will be enter-
ing Snip Nalan at 130 pounds
and Miles Lee at 157 pounds.
Both are sophomores who have
come a long way since the begin-
ning of the season.
Nalan won six of eight regular
season meets, but reached his peak
in the Big Ten meet held in Ann
Arbor three weeks ago. In that
meet he swept through all confer-
ence opponents and emerged with
I-H Scores
VOLLEY BALL
Education 4, Political Science 2
Romance Languages 6, Indus-
trial Social Research 0
PADDLE BALL
Law Club 3, Alpha Chi Sigma 0

continue in the match after his
elbow had been injured. The
Michigan grappler was ahead on
points at the time.
When Lee met Hoke again in
the Western Conference cham-
pionships, he came very close to
beating him, and only succumbed
to the Spartan flash on the basis
of a referee's decision.
* * *
ALONG WITH Oklahoma, Ok-
lahoma A & M and Michigan-
Purdue, Indiana and Princeton are
expected to enter wrestlers with
good chances of winning.
The Aggies will be entering the
largest squad of fifteen men in an
attempt to outman the rest of the
competing teams. But perhaps
quality and not quantity will win
out in the end.
Spring is Here!
Try our collegiate
hairstyles -today
8 barbers - no waiting
The Dascola Barbers
Liberty Near State

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Other Styles $12.95 to $17.50.
Sizes to 15 in some styles.

WANTY & REULE
Downtown - 210 S. Main St.

I

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Read and Use Daily Classifieds

*

wr
,.

FORD KONNO
. . . Hawaiian hurricane
100 Saturday night. Cleveland
and Clark Scholes of Michigan
State appear to be the men to beat
in both races.
* * *
Michigan's other free-stylers,
Jeffries and Ries, will see action
in the 220-yard free-style tomor-
row night. Jeffries will also swim
the 440 Saturday night.
Coach Matt Mann will probably
use Hill, Benner, Jeffries, and
Ries in the 400-yard free-style re-
lay tomorrow night and Jones,
Davies, and Benner in the 300-
yard medley relay Saturday.

MILES LEE
* . . mat man
the 130 pound title after defeating
Michigan State's Bob Gunner.
LEE WON four of six regular
season meets, and finished third
in the WesternnConference. His
two dual meet defeats were at the
All-Campus fencing tourna-
ment will be held tonight at
7:30 in the Boxing Room of the
Sports Building.
--Rod Grambeau
hands of Bob Hoke of Michigan
State and Ron Carterfield of Pitts-
burgh.
The Pitt defeat was brought

:.

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t
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A SPRING DAY is the most wonderful
luxury ever invented and you don't have
to be rich to enjoy it. IT'S FREE. Here
is something grand to tie in with the
spring days ahead. For comfort aM
style, the combination of a smart sport
coat and slacks to complete the ensem.
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latest and greatest in cut and fabric.
Our stock is complete with colorful
tweeds, checks and shetlands.
COATS $25 up
SLACKS $15 up

PENNANT HOPES RISE:
Simmons Headed forEarlyDischarge

Daily Classifieds

Bring Quick

Results

------ -- -- -

- -___
1i

607 E. LIBERTY, NEXT TO MICHIGAN THEATRE

1

CLEARWATER, Fla-(MP)-Curt
Simmons is saying goodbye to ar-
my life in a couple of weeks-and,
brother, how that piece of news is
boosting the Philadelphia Phillies'
morale.
Headquarters of the 28th U.S.
Infantry Division in Germany an-
nounced yesterday the southpaw
pitching star is scheduled to leave
for a port of embarkation the first
week in April, and then take a
ship back to this country.
THAT IS TAKEN to mean the
22-year-old hurler from Egypt, Pa.,
now a sergeant in charge of ath-
letics, will be available to the Phil-
lies soon after the opening of the
major league baseball season April
15.
A great deal, from the Phil-
lies' slant, hinges upon the re-
turn of Simmons.
From all reports, Simmons has
not lost his fine touch. Although
he naturally has devoted himself
chiefly to the more serious business
of soldiering, he has managed to
keep in top trim as a pitcher
awaiting the day of his demobili-
zation.
THEREFORE, Manager Eddie
Sawyer and all the Phils are con-
fident Curt will go a long way to-
ward putting the whiz back in
the team which two seasons ago
delighted baseball fans with its
youth and zing.
CHICAGO (AL) 8, CLEVELAND 5
TUCSON, Ariz.--(/P)-The Chi-
cago White Sox exploded with five
runs in the ninth inning yester-
day to whip Cleveland's Indians,
8-5.
In that inning the Sox got the
first two men on base via walks
from Lou Brissie. Then Gerald
Fahr replaced Brissie and the Chi-
cagoans collected three hits, the
third a home run by rookie George
Wilson.
LEFTHANDER Chuck Stobbs
hurled a two-hit shutout in his
five-inning stint. But Harold
Brown, who followed Stobbs to
A the mound, gave up five runs and

VAN HEUSEr

The American Leaguers, defeat-
ing the Pirates for the fourth
time in a row, nicked Necciai for
three singles in their big inning.
The Pirates out hit the Brownies
9-6 but couldn't put their hits to-
gether until the 9th when they
scored both of their runs.
* * *
N. Y. (NL) 9, CHICAGO NL) 6
PHOENIX, Ariz.-(P)-For the
second straight day, the New
York Giants yesterday spotted the
Chicago Cubs four runs, then ral-
lied to beat them, 9 to 6.

It was the seventh victory in a
row for the National League cham-
pions who now have won 11 of 18
games played.
* * *
THE GIANTS hammered out 15
hits this afternoon, with Bobby
Thomson, Alvin Dark and Whitey
Lockman contributing home runs.
For the Cubs, veteran Ron Nor-
they homered with one on off Sal
Maglie in the seventh. The Nor-
they wallop provided the first runs
allowed by Maglie in 20 innings.

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