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March 27, 1952 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.4

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 195.

t

HOT CARBON':
New Machine Dates Past

|

PAST 'U' PROFESSOR: KerbyUrges
Dewey Revolutionalizes b
Y Journalistic
Education Philosophv Innovations
. -. T - IR V10

CLASSIFIEDS

* * *

By MIKE WOLFF
Experts from the fields of phys-
ics, chemistry and archaeology
are collaborating with Prof. H. R.
Crane of the physics department
in unravelling the mysteries of the
past through a process known as
"radioactive dating."
Improving on a method dis-
covered at the University of Chi-
cago in 1947, Prof. Crane has de-
signed and built a machine that
dates the remains of any living
material by measuring the amount
of radioactive carbon (carbon 14)
left in it.
* * *
CARBON 14 IS manufactured
in the atmosphere by cosmic rays
-high energy nuclear particles
that constantly bombard the earth
from outer space.
All plants and animals absorb
a small quantity of carbon 14
from atmospheric carbon di-
oxide. This quantity decreases,
however, at a constant known
rate after the death of the or-
ganism, Prof. Crane said.
The age of the plant or animal
can thus be obtained by measur-
ing the supply of radioactive car-
bon remaining in the specimen,
the physicist pointed out.
M , e
THIS MEASUREMENT is made
by first placing a sample of mil-
lion-year-old carbon (usually a
piece of coal) inside a specially
designed geiger counter that is
shielded from local radiation and
cosmic rays by about four tons
of iron and lead. The measurement
obtained from this carbon is called
the "background count." ,
Next, carbon from contem-
porary material such as sugar
is measured to represent "zero
age"
The age of the unkown sample
can then be computed by compar-
ing its geiger count with these two
extreme points, Prof. Crane ex-
plained.
Among the more spectacular
objects that have been dated with
the new machine are a giant bison
from the gold-bearing gravel of
Alaska and a long extinct masta-
don from Ohio.
The date of the bison is be-
lieved to be the earliest yet ob-
tained with radioactive dating.
Twenty-Six
Win Seats on
HillelCouncil
Hillel announced today the
twenty-six new council members
elected Monday and Tuesday.
The new members are: Bill
Wise,'55; Beki Fagenbaum, '54;
Eve Kadden, '54; Sam Dodek, '54;
Bob Schrayer, '54; Dan Fogel,
'54; Ivan Scholnik, '54; Sue Bit-
man, '55; Marc Jacobson, '55;
Stew Krakover, '55; Gloria Krig-
sten, '55; Jerry Schostak, '55; Joy
Sidenberg, '55; Mort Friedman,
'54; and Dave Bornstein, '55.
Remaining positions will be held
by Norma Seidon, '54; Lori Cole,
'54; Betsy Nebel, '53Ed; Fred Ka-
petansky, '54; Joan Fried, '53;
Dolores Messinger, '55; Ellie Haar,
'53Ed; Shirley Lapinsky, '53Ed;
Meryle Reiss, '53Ed; Nancy Stern,
'54; Elaine Rothman, '53.
The new and old councils will
elect executive officers for the
coming year, Sunday. Committee
appointments will also be an-
nounced then.
Shaw To Speak

"Printers' Pleasantries" will be
the subject of an illustrated lec-
ture by Charles B. Shaw, librarian
of Swarthmore College to be given
at 4:15 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
*I'.

-Daily-Alan Reid
BACKWARD IN TIME-Prof. H. R. Crane of the physics depart-
ment demonstrates his new machine for dating the remains of
ancient plants and animals. The iron and lead blocks that sur-
round it are protection against natural radiation and cosmic rays.
Many Campus Leaders
Favo* Coed Union Planr

By RUTH HARWITZ
The University was a rapidly
growing institution in the horse-
and-buggy days of 1884, when a
young Hegelian idealist, John
Dewey came here to assume an
instructorship in the philosophy
department.
Dewey, who was destined to
become one of the greatest and
most controversial of American
philosophers, immediately began
to take an active part in the cul-
tural life of Ann Arbor town.
* * *
BUT THE INITIAL impact of
his presence was on the philoso-
phy department, then under the
chairmanship of George S. Mor-
ris.
At the University, as in later
years, Dewey's main concern was
always with the problem of how
he could take philosophy beyond
the classroom to the man-on-
the-street-and eventually to
all social institutions.
This idea found expression in
his writings and in his classroom
lectures. Increasingly in all his
activities, Dewey came to regard
educational institutions as social
instruments.
* * *
WITH SEVERAL other instruc-
tors, Dewey lived at a boarding
house on Jefferson Street.
Alice Chipman, one of two
coeds whosat across the table
from him in that boarding
house, elected a course in psy-
chology under the new 'instrue-
tor and later became Mrs.
Dewey in 1886.
The interest she shared with
her husband in intellectual af-
fairs far surpassed that she held
in housekeeping, and their home
at 15 Forest Avenue became a
meeting place for the best minds.
in Ann Arbor.
* * *
VERY MUCH interested in the
theory of education, John Dewey
was one of the prime movers in
founding the Michigan School-
masters' Club, to which he made
some of his earlier contributions
on education, and, sympathetically
seconded by Mrs. Dewey, he at-
tempted to try out his theories on
his own three children-with the
result that old Ann Arborites still
regale one another with tales of
how the Dewey methods worked.
When Prof. Morris died in the
spring of 1889, Dewey, by that
time an assistant professor, was
promoted to the rank of pro-
fessor of philosophy and in-

By CAROL HERSHEY j
"Just because newspapers and
newspapermen have done things
one way for generations doesn't
necessarily mean it is the right or
best way," William F. Kerby, vice-
president of the Wall Street Jour-
nal, said in tthe seventh of the
University Lectures in Journalism
yesterday.
Speaking on the topic "The
Newspaper That Threw Away the
Rule Book," Kerby described the
conversion of the Wall Street
Journal from a trade publication
to a "national daily devoted to
national affairs."
The metamorphosis of, the
Journal rested on one basic policy,
Kerby said-"Do things different-
ly; throw away the rule book."

LOST AND FOUND
WILL THE PERSON who picked the
wrong tan gabardine men's overcoat
at Mosher Friday night, March 21,
please call Art Bublitz, 3-0521 Ext. 564.
BICYCLE FOUND-Owner call 2-8269
between 7 and 8 p.m. )31L
FOR SALE

Your Official UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN RING is waiting
for you - NOW - at
Burr Patt's, 1209 S. Univ.

) 58

JOHN DEWEY...
Taught at 'U'
* * e

(Continued from Page 1)

create artificial barriers and pre-
vent the "solidification of the
campus."
"As a result," Len Wilcox, SL
president, claims, "there is not a
wholesome relationship between
men and women on a divided
campus." It is also argued that
a large number of men and wo-
men are dateless on weekends
because there is no institutional
medium on campus which al-
Law Institute
To Convene
Tomorrow
The Law School in co-operation
with the Michigan Law Institute
of the State Bar will open its
second Institute on Problems of
Land Title Examination in Michi-
gan at 2 p.m. tomorrow in Room
100 of Hutchins Hall.
The two-day institute, which
will be attended by practicing
lawyers, is intended to give prac-
tical discussions to the problems
that confront the lawyer in his
day to day practice.
Ray L. Potter of a Detroit ab-
stract company will discuss the
mechanics of abstract examina-
tion that will materially shorten
the time devoted to such activi-
ties.
Perry W. Norton of the Lincoln,
Nebraska Bar will discuss the
practicality and effect of title
standards. Prof. Lewis M. Simes
of the Law School will discuss the
Michigan law relative to titles
from estates of deceased persons.
On Saturday Prof. Ralph W.
Aigler of the Law School will
speak on the nature and effec-
tiveness of comprehensive title
clearance statutes. Prof. L. Hart
Wright, also of the Law School,
will speak on tax liens that affect
titles. Frank Kennedy of a Detroit
abstract company will discuss tax
titles in Michigan.
The series of Institutes pre-
sented throughout the year give
the bench and bar an opportunity
to assemble with students and
faculty to promote a better knowl-
edge and understanding of pro-
fessional affairs.

lows them to cultivate friend-
ships with the opposite sex.
At present, Wilcox pointed out,
State St. restaurants are fulfilling
this function - but inadequately
because of lack of space.
NEITHER WILCOX nor Phil
Berry, SL treasurer, believes that
a new union building could be con-
structed in the foreseeable future.
But, they contend, a larger, re-
modeled Union could be opened to
coeds in a matter of a few years.
Under their plan, women
would be allowed access to fa-
cilities such as the swimming
pool, bowling alleys and cafeter-
ia, and also to such facilities as
would be available in the new
addition.
Berry referred to the success of
South Quad's "co-educational"
Club 600 as an example of the po-
tential popularity of a student un-
ion. The fashionable Club 600, a
modernistic cafeteria with a snack
bar, juke-box, and TV set, has
often been flooded with men and
their dates as well as with unes-
corted coeds.
And Wilcox points to the stu-
dent unions at Illinois, Wiscon-
sin, Minnesota, Michigan State,
and Northwestern, which, he
claims, are "superior to ours as
centers of campus and in facil-
ities."
Both students speculate that a
co-educational union at the Uni-.
versity would be very popular,
would contribute to school spirit,
and would bring campus organiza-
tions closer together.
They acknowledge, however, the
many knotty problems which
would present themselves before a
co-educational union could be re-
alized. "But the barriers are not
insurmountable," Wilcox insists.
"It can be done, if we get the
backing of the student body and
the administration."
(Next: THE OBSTACLES)
WPAG Discussion
Ted Friedman, '53, president of
Students for Democratic Action,
will discuss campus political ques-
tions with Bob Marshall on
"Marshall's Miscellany" from 9 to
10 p.m. today on station WPAG.

stalled as head of the philoso-
phy department.
He had been written down by
the public as an idealist, but there
was already evident in his think-
ing the dominance of two new
influences: functional psychology
and the evolutionary theory of
Darwin and Spencer.
In 1894, Dewey accepted a
similar position with the Uni-
versity of Chicago. He was of-
fered an opportunity for com-
bining courses in philosophy,
psychology, and education, plus
a salary increase, important to
a professor with family respon-
sibilities. As one of the local
newspapers reported, "A good
philosopher reasons: the greater
the salary, the more money I
* can make"-and that is one
reason John Dewey left here.
When Dewey left the University,
he was no longer the same ideal-
ist; he was turning away from
Kant and Hegel and moving
toward the development of the
doctrine of pragmatism, or, as he
preferred to call it, "instrumen-
talism."
He was about to discard the
absolutist theory of truth for the
empiricists. Twenty-five years
later, he insisted that philosophy
should apply the scientific, prag-
matic method to test social insti-
tutions.
The rest of his story is well-
known. Today an octagenarian,
Dewey lives a secluded life which
stands in contrast to nearly
three-fourths a century of active
work.

"And that policy has made
the Wall Street Journal the
best current newspaper success
story," he maintained.
"Editorial success is the only
real basis for profitable operation"
Kerby continued. He pointed out
that since the decision to convert
in 1934 the Journal has raised its
subscription rate to 230,000 copies
daily.
"Important stories don't have
to be long," he declared in citing
condensation as one of the first
new precedents the Journal es-
tablished. He challanged the
audience to find a newspaper
that throws away more copy
than the Journal.
"The typical American news-
paper today is an assembly line
job," he claimed. "In contrast,"
he asserted, "95 per cent of the
Journal's news is 'of our own
origination,' with only five per
cent obtained from the four big
news bureaus."
In praise of group journalism
he said that a single reporter
rarely writes a Journal story.
MAT. TILL 5 P.M. 44c EVE. 65c
CHILDREN 16c
HELD OVER
NOW THRU FRIDAY
Continuous from i P.M.

GABARDINE PANTS $5.49-$7.50 value.'
Colors: brown, blue, green, grey-ad-
vertised in Life. Sam's Store, 122 E.
WASH. Ph. 3-8611. )50
SUITS, jackets, top coats, 36 and 36
long. Bargains. Phone 3-0254. 315 E.
Liberty (side door). )63
BEAVER COAT-% length-$100; Suits,
size 10, beige, wine. REAL BARGAINS.
Cali 2-7732 after 5 p.m. )51
JENSEN BASS reflex speaker cabinet
(w/ or without coaxial speaker); Rek-
O-Kut professional disc recorder;
Radio interference eliminator; A.C.
power pack for portables. Token
prices. 3-0521. Ext. 790. )65
1947 FORD SPORTSMAN. 3000 mi. on
motor & tires. Best offer. R. Shellow.
Ph. 2-1580. )66
SELMAR CLARINET. Excellent ondi-
tion. Very reasonable. 6410 Sco Hse.,
S.Q. )67
MISCELLANEOUS
SPECIAL-on Poodle Permanents, com-
plete - $5.00. Modern Beauty Shop.
117% S. Main, Ph. 8100. )20M
SHIRTS LAUNDERED-18c each. 1 day
service, no extra charge. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )23M
APPLICATION PHOTOS-3 day service.
Wed. and Sat. hours 10-4. Palmer
Studio, Michigan Theater Building.
)21M
MEALS-l block from campus, frater-
nity quality. Low prices. 1108 Hill,
Ph. 3-1841. )26M
THE best cosmetics are "BEAUTY
COUNSELORS." Try them. Men's
and Women's. Phone 2-5152. )5M
USE OUR little' ads for 'Big' results.
Far-fetched? No-there's humor, in-
terest, excitement, and Big news in
the little ads you find in the classi-
fied section of the Daily. )27M

PERSONAL

AT LAST
Laundry service you wanted. 7 lbs.
for 56c. 1 day service. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )12P
I DIDN'T KNOW until my roommate
told me that the best place .to find
terrific bargains is in The Daily's
value-packed Want-Ads! I Know
now! I always read themi )19P
BUSINESS SERVICES
PERSONALIZED TYPING. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Ph. 3-0254. 315 E. Lib-
erty (side door). )4B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )6B
TYPEWRITER & Fountain Pen repair
work a specialty. Typewriters, Adding
Machines and W /C Tape and Wire
Recorders. Morrill's, 314 S. State St.
)9B
TYPING-Reasonable Rates. Accurate
& Efficient. Phone 7590. 830 So. Main.
)1B
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS-Repairs! on
all makes. Office Equipment Co. 215
E. Liberty. Ph. 2-1213. )5B
TYPING-IBM Electromatic; Thesis and
technical experience, stenography, Ph.
8587. )10B
FOR RENT
APT. HUNTING? - Try Apt. Finding
Service at the Campus Tourist .Home.
Rooms by day or week. Kitchen Priv.
518 E. William St., 3-8454. )5R
TRANSPORTATION
SENIORS-Join the official class trip
to Fla. aboard the Sunland Special.
Administration Building 1-4:30 thr.
March 28th. )3T
WANTED - Riders to Florida Spring
Vacation. Call Al 2-0648. )6T
THREE, GIRLS want round trip ride to
Denver, Spring Vacation, share ex-
penses. L. Schrader, Ypsiy 4351. )8T
GET HOME the cheap way. Advertise
for a ride. )9T
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED-One old piano. Will buy or
rent. Call 3-0521 ex. 297. )4X
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR MALE STUDENTS-One single,. one
double.I1bik. from Law Club. 808
Oakland. # )21R

4

t:
4,

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

a

ono"

r14bbciatioKh fPR depedehtEIeTt
P RES E NTSi
LITTLE CLUB

A JOB
IS A JOB
IS A iC
~~When you;
..OR
The Case of the
THREE-CENT I
Once there was a Sc
facedthe grim pr
Graduation, With So(
rity 42 years away,
nized the need of aj

B
get it

Today, Frday & SaturdayALL
('API~D1ITTO NJOYI a
UflA.LUIGL1LNHeading
straight to
your heart
. 1fi i',to thrill you

*

I

I

F R I DAY, MARCH 2 8

a

coXeo old ad Ii4 %jCotn6o
L E A G U E R U M P U S R OOM

'v~

I

JL*W J1. l .ltJ~lW.~

PATSY
enior who
ospect of
cial Secu-
he recog-
job.

again and
again!

At
6:45
and
9:35

1,

I So he burrowed manfully
through ClassifiedhSections, under "Help
Wanted," in search of the Right Niche.
Spotted it, too, one day. A honey. Good
Mney, the right field, nice location, pen-
sions and benefits up to here. The ad asked
for Brief Histories from applicants.
So he wrote. Not cockily, but convincingly.
A masterpiece that took four nights and
filled six pages with Deathless Prose. It left
no doubt that here was The Man for the
Job. He slapped on a 3-cent stamp.
P.S. - he didn't get the job. His epistle
wound up as 334th in the pile, and they never
got down that far. Hired one of the first
eight, as a matter of fact-all of whom had
Enough Brains to flash the Data by telegram
and land on Top of the Heap.
Whether you're canvassing Personnel Man.
agers orjust hooking up with a Hen Back
Home, you can count on a Telegram to get
there first. A Potent Point to remember, too,
when sounding out Pop for Pesos, remember.
ing Mother's Day, or working up a Weekend.
Two words to the Wise are "Western Union."

COU RAGE

\'I
Kt
1 }.

eve Dwar

I

and
C3INFMA G ILD) the
STUDENT
PLAYERS
present
"THE BAKER'S WIFE"1
STARRING
RAIMU
"Scandalously funny . . . a true comedy . .."
-N. Y. Times
"The lustiest, bawdiest, most compassionate
comedy ever screened." -Harper's Bazaar
ARCH. AUD. 50c (tax incl.)
Fri. & Sat., March 28 & 29 7:30-9:30

:1
y*,
* I
r I

Hear its
ever-new
SONGSL.

At 8:20 Only

I

U.

--

NOW PLAYING
ODETS'
ROCKET TO
THE MOON
Arts Theater

Coming Saturday
MARLON
BRANDO
in Steinbeck's
"VIVA
ZAPATA"

FOR
MAIL
LCANDIES

BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT
YOU ARE PRIVILEGED TO PURCHASE
DIAMONDS
0 Front the fabulous studios that house
the Varga, Jonkers, and Hope diamonds.
Prices--That are well under the normal market.
Quality-with a money back guarantee that removes
all the elements of chance.
Selection-that includes everything from one tenth
carat at fifty dollars to stones of fabulous size and value.
Service-that is always friendly, and never "high
S pressure." --TonSuckling 1
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733
> ?<-!yot <-yO<->G<-O<-Yt)> "<-y' tOt)<-y

Extra-
All New
WALT DISNEY'S H
"OLYMPIC ELK"
Color by
Technicolor
START SATURDAY
"Q UO VA DIS"

I

i

RU DOLPH

-1

I

-

Ph, 5651 Hr.
~U~POO M

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

I

I

~ A PULITZER PRIZE PLAY
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PRESENTS
Robert E. Sherwood's
TUEDE CUAI I RE hifl l IIIUT

ESERKIN
PIANO RECITAL
and Fugue in A minor..........Bach
3-flat (Hammerklavier) ....Beethoven
........................Busoni
m mobile............... . .. Busoni
n to the Dance, Op. 65.. .....Weber
1P On 6 . .. .. .. .. .. .Chopin

I

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|

1

HELD OVER THROUGH SUNDAY
Thy funniest picture that ever crossed the "Big Drink I"
E .J.!ARTHUR RANK %

'

m

I

I

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i

Rnrrnrn I I r

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