100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1951 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1951 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN2

Gargoyle
Leers Its
UglyHead
Spring semester saw Gargoyle
back in his home in the Student
Publications Building, after a se-
mester off. campus, as the "cata-
clysmic" room mate of Generation.
The 42-year-old humor maga-
zine was thought to have been si-
lenced forever when financial dif-
ficulties and lack of student inter-
est caused the Board in Control
of Student Publications to muffle
the voice of the impish little man
with the horns and the turned up
nose, a year ago last spring.
A brave band of undaunted hu-
morists burrowed underground,
however, and came up with a ma-
gazine and a lot of dirt.
IN A 2x4 section of the basement
of a campus cafeteria, the office of
Gargoyle was established.
There they managed to turn
out two financially and artis-
tically successful editions of Gar-
goyle and were officially rein-
stated by the Board, last spring.
Peg Nimz, '53, managing editor
announced plans to put out a quar-
tet of "incredible volumes for the
price of 25 cents, which is all that
traffic will bear." Miss Nimz may
be heard making this announce-
ment every afternoon in front of
the Library steps.
} When asked ,to comment on the
Gargoyle's position with the Board,
Miss Nimz replied:
"Someone stole our pterodac-
tyls."
THE GARG is often advertised
as the outfit where "only lunatics
need apply," but actually the staff
is a business-like, hard working
group.
Staff work is divided up among
the following departments: liter-
ary, circulation and promotion,
advertising and art.
Students may try out for any
of these departments, and re-
ceive promotions according to
his efficiency.
Many former Gargoyle staffers
are now holding important posi-
tions on other publications.

STUDENT EDITED AND MANAGED:
Daily Starts 62nd Year of Publication

t

* - -

- - -

* * .

The Michigan Daily, edited and
managed entirely by University
students is the most important
news agency for'the campus and
has long been rated one of the
outstanding college dailies in the
country.
Now in its 62nd year of publi-
cation, The Daily boasts a com-
plete printing plant including an
electronic engraver and a rotary
press, financial independence and
a strong alumni group numbering
hundreds of men and women in
the publication field in this coun-
try and abroad.
-* * *
STAFFED locally by more than
200 student editors, reporters and
business staffers, The Daily offers
complete campus and city cover-
age plus Associated Press cover-
age of national and world events.
Published six times weekly -
Tuesday through Sunday-during
the school year, The Daily has
the latest closing deadline of any
morning paper in the State. The
front page is put to bed at 2 a.m.
and the circulation department
makes good on a promise of de-
liverysbefore breakfast to sub-
scribers.
On the editorial page The
Daily depends upon its staff
members for signed contribu-
tions which represent their in-
dividual opinions.
The editorial page also features
syndicated columnists Drew Pear-
son, the Alsop brothers and Doris
Fleeson. In addition to local car-
tooning by Daily cartoonists, Herb
Block, the Pulitzer-prizewinning
cartoonist of the Washington Post
is carried by The Daily.
The letters to the editor column
is open to readers of The Daily
as a public forum. All letters
which are signed, 300 words or
less in length and in good taste
are published.
* * *
THE DAILY was first published
in the fall of 1890 by a group of
non-fraternity men. It showed its
stamina by surviving its competi-
tors in the field and after the turn
of the century, it was purchased
by the University. Shortly after-
wards, it was moved from a small
downtown print shop to the Ann
Arbor Press building and the name
was changed to The Michigan
Daily.
The present Student Publica-
tions Building, opened in 1932,
was financed largely by The
Daily's earnings. It contains to-
day one of the finest physical
plants, for a newspaper the size
of The Daily, in the country.
The most recent acquisition is a
new rotary press, installed last fall.
* s*"
THE DAILY is published by
students under the authority of

Te linic Gives
Added Culture
To Engineers
The Michigan Technic, featur-
ing scientific articles and reports
of engineering research-as well as
features designed to provide engi-
neers with the "culture" they are
accused of lacking-is published
monthly by engineering students.
Faculty members and engineer-
ing college alumni as well as stu-
dents write for the magazine, but
editing, photography, leg work and
advertising sales are handled by
the student staff.
One of the few financially in-
dependent college engineering ma-
gazines in the country, the Technic
has received many top awards in
the annual Engineering College
Magazine Association competition.
The Technic is the oldest cam-
pus publication.
The editors hope in their nine
issues scheduled to come off the
press this year to quell all doubts
that engineers are literate.

Students Publish 'Ensian,
Official Campus Yearbook

Michigan's "Official" scrapbook
--that's the 'Ensian, student-pub-
lished yearbook for 54 years.
Shortened from "Michiganen-
sian," the book's name came from
someone's mispronunciation for
the suggested name-"Michigan-
ensis.'
THE 1952 yearbook, which goes
on sale in the fall will be delivered
to an estimated 4,000 purchasers
before the end of the spring semes-
ter, will be priced at five dollars,
according to Harry Miller, '52,
managing editor. The 500-page
glossy - page book will feature
sports sections, groups and campus
activities, with an emphasis on
photography.
The 'Ensian began publication
in 1897, selling for a mere dollar.
In the beginning it was the joint
work of three then existing maga-
zine staffs, which were the Litera-
ture and Engineering, Law and In-
dependent magazines.
Many opportunities for differ-
ent kinds of work and proipo-
tion are available on the 'Ensian.

The editorial staff works on the
preparation and assembly of
copy and photographs. There is
work available for writers, pho-
tographers, typists and those in-
terested in the lay-out and de-
design of the 'Ensian.
For those interested in the busi-
ness staff, there are positions to
handle accounts, contracts, ad-
vertising and sales.
ALL ELIGIBLE students may try
out for the 'Ensian.
The outstanding tryouts of the
editorial and business staff are
recognized each year with com-
plimentary copies of the 'Ensian
and may petition for positions
on the junior and senior staffs
at the end of their sophomore
year.
These positions include the man-
aging editor, business manager, art
editor, junior editors, and the pho-
tography editor.
The 'Ensian is published under
the authority of the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.

HOME OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS IS THIS COMPLETELY EQUIPPED BUILDING.

the Board in Control of Student
Publications, which is made up
of students elected by the campus
at large, and faculty and alumni
appointees.
The Board does not censor -
editorials or news articles.-
It has general responsibility for
the financial success of student
publications, but actual adminis-
tration is left to the students.
* *' *
TRYOUTS on The Daily edi-
torial staff go through a semester
training program to learn the fun-
damentals of reporting, proofread-
ing, and headline writing. This is
followed by assignment to the re-
portorial staff, with responsibility
for seeing that a particular beat
is covered.
From this staff, the night edi-
tors and their assistants - the
junior staff - are chosen. Each
night editor is in complete
charge of the actual publication
of the paper one night per week.
The senior editors are the man-
aging editor, who has general re-
sponsibility for everything that
appears in The Daily; the editor-
ial director, who is in charge of
the editorial page; the city editor,
who handles local news assign-
ments and directs the night edi-
tors; the feature editor, who takes
care of feature articles; and the
associate editors, who are respon-
sible for the training programs,
and photography.
The junior and senior staffs

are selected by the Board in
Control of Student Publications
upon the recommendation of the
managing editor, and receive
salaries.
Parallel appointments as night
editors and senior editors are made
on the sports and women's staffs.
* * * '
THE BUSINESS STAFF has
charge of The Daily's finances. It
handles advertising, accounts, and
circulation.

Junior and senior jobs, as on
the editorial staff, are appoint-
ive, salaried positions.
The top business position is that
of business manager.
THE DAILY has won numerous
awards for excellence, including
those given by the Associated Col-
legiate Press, Sigma Delta Chi,
and the National Advertising
Service.

CAMPUS NEWCOMER:
Generation Publishes
Student Work in Arts

MICHIGAN STUDENTS
We welcome you to the beautiful campus
of the University of Michigan
Be sure to visit the MUSIC CENTER, Inc. for
STELEVISION
Q o RADIO & PHONO COMBINATIONS
" RECORDS
e SHEET MUSIC
6 TAPE RECORDERS
* STRING INSTRUMENTS REPAIRS
e RADIO & TV SERVICE
Engineers will marvel at our Service Department
p The MUSIC CENTER, Inc.
300 SOUTH THAYER Just West of Hill Auditorium Phone 2-2500 or 7200
e

<: ..

®v

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

f

A comparative newcomer among
student publications, Generation is
a magazine which publishes stu-
dent work in the arts--literature,
music, visual art, architecture and
the dance.
The quarterly publication pro-
vides a showcase for the creative
work being done by students and
also an outlet for new forms of art.
Dan Waldron, Grad., heads a board
of editors which strives to bring
the campus interesting, vital art.
The idea for Generation was ori-
ginally conceived by the Inter Arts
Union, an organization of students
and faculty which sponsors and
encourages student activity in the
arts.
Already rated as one of the na-
tion's best student arts magazines,
Generation features &6 pages of.
lithographed type and giaphic dis-'
plays. It sells for 35 cents.
Contributions for the magazine
are accepted from all students in
any field of art at the Generation
office in the Student Publications
Building.
Tryouts for the staff meet dur-
ing the first few weeks of classes
and all eligible students may gain
the right to petition for editorial
positions by serving a period of ap-
prenticeship.
Appointments to major positions;

are made by the Board in Cont:ol
of Student Publications.
The business staff wbicn man-
ages advertising, accounts a n d
sales selects its staff separately.
Music Groups
Include Choir,
Choral Union
Musically-minded students have
numerous opportunities on the
campus to indulge their avocation
-including some half-dozen stu-
dent choral groups.
The Men's and Women's Glee
Clubs, the Arts Chorale, and the
University Choir -- in addition to
the famed Choral Union - give
concerts during the year.
* * *
STUDENTS WHO are not in the
music school are eligible to parti-
cipate.
Some of the groups, such as
the University C h o i r, carry
course credit. Others are pure-
ly recreational - like the Glee
Clubs and Arts Chorale.
The Glee Clubs, besides present-
ing a number of concerts in Ann
Arbor, have road trips during
which they perform in cities all
around the country.

r

a i

.1
it takes talent and experience
to lift weights!
But, only interest to try out for the Michigan Daily Editorial Staff! Yes,
that's right - no previous experience is necessary to become an active
participant on the staff of Michigan's official News Organ.
The Michigan Daily offers exceptional opportunities to gain practical
training in writing and editing -- experience which has helped more than
100 former staff members to achieve successful careers in Journalism and
many other fields. All eligible freshmen and upperclassmen interested in

F

i

r
i-
I A.
k
'i

I

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING QUICK RESULTS

r-:=

I

6

A high quality
Custom Recording Service
is available immediately
adjacent to the campus.
We are completely equipped to fill your needs--
Long playing microgroove, or standard 78 RPM
RECORDS, as well as TAPE RECORDING.
Our modern, air-conditioned, studio is equipped
with a STEINWAY GRAND PIANO, with the latest
and best recorders obtainable.
We have special rates for CONCERTS, PLAYS,
and RECITALS which are, of course, recorded at
the place of performance.
Our long experience and our money-back guar-
antee are your assurance of complete satisfaction.
We also sell EKOTAPE TAPE RECORDERS and
all types of home recording supplies.
For your convenience, tape recorders are also

I

ly

available for rentals.

«

III

1) 111

I

} 41

0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan