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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1951 - Image 14

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A. A.IL)b M),a I

I-

ootball Tickets
Free' to Students
Basketball, Other Sports Admission
Charges Paid for by Tuition Fees
Student tickets for all Michigan home football games will be dis-
buted beginning Monday, Sept. 24, in Barbour Gymnasium, under
group seating plan instituted in 1949 by SL and the Board in
ntrol of Intercollegiate Athletics.
Along with the pasteboards, covered by the tuition fee along
h other University privileges, students this season will receive an
litional bonus.
Game programs, which in the past have been handled by private
irces, will be given out at each contest to all student ticketholders
e of charge.
The programs include names and numbers of Miohigan and op-
sing team players.
The tickets themselves are handed out on the basis of seniority.
niors receive the best of the student allotment of seats, juniors the
onext best, and so on down to fresh-

luge Building
'rogram for
U' Under Way
A multi-million dollar buildingI
ogram which will provide acres
new classroom, dormitory, hos-
tal and research facilities is1
aring completion on the cam-
I back of Angell Hall, the lit-1
ary college building, a new four
or addition complete with an;
ht-story office room tower is
ing pushed to completion to
lace classroom and lecture hall;
ace destroyed in the Haven Hall
e a 'year and a half ago. The;
Lck and steel structure will cost
er $4,000,000 when it is finally
mupleted in the fall of 1952.
New steel stairways are also be-
g built into the north and south
id of the present Angell Hall
'ucture.
The new skyscraper men's dorm-
ry, South Quad, will be par-
Mly completed by the fall and
ficials expect to house about 500
en in it the first semester. By
e second semester, the entire
ilding's capacity of 1,150 should
ready for occupancy, they say.
In the University hospital area,
e new Outpatient Clinic and
edical Research Building which
gether will cost a total of $6,-
0,000 are well under way. Con-
ete pouring has been completed
i all six floors of the clinic and
e foundation work on the first
or of the research building
hiich will. be used by the Medical
chool is under way.

men.
Students may pick up their tick-
ets any day from Monday until
Friday. In order to rer'(-ive them,
they must present a cashier's re-
ceipt at the student football ticket
window in Barbour Gym.
The cashier's receipt is coupon
number 6 on the "railroad ticket."
(To the unitiated, that's the regis-
tration card with the many sec-
tions.)
Those who wish to sit together
at games may do so by presenting
their receipts at the s-lme time.
Students in different classes may
sit together, but they will do so
in the section where the one with
the least semesters in residence
sits. Seniors who wish to sit with
freshmen forfeit their chances of
sitting on the 50 yard line; they
must sit in the end zone.
Returning students must bring
a transcript to registration so that
the number of semesters in resi-
dence may be determined. Two
summer sessions counts as one re-
gular semester under the plan.
Ticket manager Don Weir hand-
les all the arrangements for the
distribution, in addition to serving
as czar of a complicated domain
down in the athletic administration
building.
Ticket requests from coast to
coast for Michigan home games
flood into the office, which carries
a full staff of secretaries to handle
the voluminous corespondence'.

Men Students
Live Mostly
In Group Units
Most University men park their
golf bags and hang their hats in
dormitory resident halls.or fra-
ternity houses during their strug-
gle with higher education.
All freshmen must spend one
year in the dormitories before
they can make the move to fra-
ternity houses or rooms in private
homes.
- * , ,
THE "MICHIGAN House Plan"
in the resident dormitories meets
the social, fraternal and athletic
needs ti University males so well
that many men never make the
move. 4
Resident advisors offer aca-
demic advice and general coun-
selling to the dorm dwellers,
and, through their staff assist-
ants (one to a floor), protect
property and keep a reasonable
respect for order alive in the
dormitories.
Each house in the Quads also
has an associate advisor. Associ-
ate advisors or "house mothers,"
help direct social activities and al-
ways are around to give the femi-
nine side of the picture, when its
sought. . , *
T H E STUDENT government
program is probably the force that
is most effective in making the
quads more than just a place to
sleep.
Each house council determines
in large part the conduct and ac-
tivity of its own house. Leaders
from the quads student govern-
ment become members of the
Board of Governors of the quad-
rangles and as such have a great
influence in determining Univer-
sity policy on the quads.
* * *
ABOUT 15 per cent of the stu-
dent body are affiliated with fra-
ternities.
At the University, fraternities
have always been a large force
in student affairs. Social activi-
ties are mixed with academic
chores in fraternities with a "re-
laxed tension" that appeals to a!
great number of University men.
Freshmen who want to take a!
Nook at fraternity life may sign up'
for rushing at the beginning of
their second semester, after they
have made their grades.
If they elect to affiliate with a
fraternity, an dare nominated by
one, they must remain in the
quads until the end of their first
year. However, they can parti-
cipate in all fraternity activities
durin gthat time, and they move
into fraternity houses at begin-
ning of their sophomore year.

Looking after the health of the
thousands of Michigan students
is the job of the University's
Health Service-one of the first
and best student health centers
in the United States.
The Health Service provides
necessary medical care and treat-
ment without charge in its build-
ing a half-block off-campus on
Fletcher St.
BEFORE A STUDENT can reg-
ister for the first time at the Uni-
versity, he must receive a tho-
rough physical examination, us-
ually lasting about two hours. X-
rays are also taken to check for
tuberculosis.
Records are made of any de-
fects in posture, of past illnesses
and minor complaints. But it is
entirely up to the student
whether or not he takes ad-
vantage of Health Service fa-
cilities.
Each student is assigned to a
physician medical adviser whom
he may feel free to call on for ad-
vice or treatment of any ailment.
* * *
IF THE SERVICES of a spe-
cialist are required, the student
will be referred to one of the
Health Service's specially equipped
departments, which include:
Minor surgery (cases requiring
intensive surgery are referred
to the University Hospital).
A physiotherapy clinic for ul-
tra-violet light treatments, and
with whirlpool baths to aid stu-
dents to regain the use of limbs
kept in casts or stiff for other
reasons.
A mental hygiene department
with full-time psychologists and
psychiatrists taking care of situ-
ations ranging from questions of
general personality and scholastic
adjustment ot psychological and
emotional problems of a more
complicated nature.
AN EYE CLINIC that offers'
complete refractions and then en-
ables students to buy glasses made
by private companies at significant
savings.
A dental clinic for examina-
tion and treatments (most den-
tal repair work is referred to
the Dental School or private
dentists).
A clinic nurses station for dress-
ings, general treatments a n d
emergencies that also handles vac-
cinations and injections. Should a
student be involved in a local ac-
cident and taken by friends or
police to an Ann Arbor hospital,
the Health Service will help with
the bill.

Clinics of dermatology, d i e ts
therapy and ear, nose and throat.t
Student patients are never used
as clinical subjects for medical
student instruction or experimen-
tation.
* * *
A 60-BED INFIRMARY is lo-
cated on the third floor of the
Health Service. However, Dr. War-,
ren E. Forsythe, director of the
Service, pointed out that it is sel-t
dom that more than half the beds;
are used at any one time.
Cases that cannot be handled]
by the Health Service are gener-
ally referred to the 1,029-bed
University Hospital. In cases of
serious illness, parents are no-
tified by special delevery letters.
In the "good old days" when a
student became ill in his room, his
roommate usually provided all the
medical and nursing attention
which he might receive.
IF THINGS GOT BAD, t h e
roommate usually put his buddy
on a train and sent him home.
If someone came down with a
eentagious disease and an epi-
demic developed, the college us-
ually declared an unexpected
two-week holiday. No students,
no epidemic.
The first University Health
Service was organized in 1913. It
was staffed by three physicians, a
nurse, a clerk, and had a budget
of $10,000ewith which to assist
the University's 5,520 students.
LOCOTED ON the third floor
of the modern $500,000 four-story
Health Service building first op-
ened in 1940 is an infirmary with
20 full or part-time nurses, where
students requiring bed care are
hospitalized.
, * * *
STUDENT ELIGIBILITY f o r
Health Servicefacilities is auto-
matic with the taking of four
hours or more of credit hours (in-
cluding fellowship teachers), while
those with less than four hours
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

BEST IN NATION:
'U' Provides Low Cost Med

ical Service
can obtain privileges by paying a
$10 fee at the beginning of a se-
mester.
Though faculty and students'
wives are not included in this
eligibility list, they may be giv-
en certain injections at the
Health Service,
Services offered to students
without charge include 15 days of
general hospitalization d u r i n g
each semester at a daily expense
allowance of more than $10.00,
surgeon fees and operating ex-
penses for acute surgical condi-
tions, simple drugs and dressings,
and medical attention at the var-
ious University summer camps.

Freshman health lectures, the
traditional bane of first year stu-
dents, will be waived for those who
can pass a special examination
given during orientation week this
year, Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, dir-
ector of the Health Service has
announced.
Those who do not pass the
exam, however, must attend the
six-lecture series and pass an-
other examination given at the
end of the course of lectures. The
lectures are designed to acquaint
students with health problems re-
lated specifically to the student
environment.

All first year students will be
required to attend the first lec-
ture on Oct. 8 (for men) or Oct.
22 (for women) in the Natural
Science Auditorium. At that time
it will be announced which stu-
dents earned the privilege of not
attending the series by passing
the orientation week exam.
The men's lectures will be given
by Dr. Forsythe and members of
his staff in three sections during
the middle of October.
Women's lectures will be given
by Dr. Margaret Bell and other
staff women in two sections ther
last week in October.

i'

4' 4
+' \ \"

Freshman Health Lectures
Waived for Some Students

f

FOR FACULTY AND
STUDENTS ALIKE..
TINKER & CO. right on the campus have pro-
vided fine suits and top-coats . . . meticulously
tailored to measure for Men and Women.
For class, dress or lounging, TINKER &
CO. have the right styles, the correct fabrics and
at surprisingly low prices.
Freshmen . . . come in and get acquainted.
Soph s, Juniors and Seniors are sure to know us.
KAHN TAILVRE \LVTHES
613 EAST WILLIAM ST tE ET

Ia

For other athletic events, stu-
dents may gain admission by show-
ing their identification cards--with
some exceptions. Swimming and
hockey carry a small ticket fee to
help liquidate the cost of these
sports.

I

,I

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SEASON TICKET PRICES: Main Floor, $7.80 (Tax Incl.) First Balcony, $6.60 (Tax Incl.),
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m '*in ~ - _____________________________________________

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