100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1951 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

V

Y, SEPTEMBER 20, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA

SZIGETI, BRA ILOWSKY, LEYVANT:

!

4.

Concert Series To Offer Top Artists in Music Field

* * *

* * *

Music-lovers will be assured of
a rich season of professional mu-
sical offerings in Ann Arbor dur-
ing the 1951-'52 season, according
to the University Musical Society's
plans.
The 26 performances to be given
will include concerts by leading
major symphony orchestras under
distinguished conductors, several
choral groups, recitals by singers
and instrumentalists, and cham-
ber music offerings.
** *
TEN ATTRACTIONS will be
presented by the '73rd annual
Choral Union Series which will
open on Oct. 4 when Victoria de
los Angeles, Spanish soprano, will
give her recital.
Next in the series, Josef Szi-
geti-distinguishedsHungarian
violinist-will perform on Oct.
15. This will mark his first ap-
pearance in Ann Arbor in eight
years.
Two symphony orchestras are
next on the musical agenda. On
Oct. 21, Charles Munch will again
bring his Boston Symphony Or-
chestra to Hill Auditorium, and
the Cleveland Orchestra will also
make its annual appearance un-
der the direction of George Szell
on Nov. 4.
* * *
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY
will appear for a recital on Nov.
16. Following this celebrated pian-
ist will be Salvatore Baccoloni,
Italian basso buffo of the Metro-
politan Opera Association, who
will give a concert on Nov. 29.

OSCAR LEVANT VICTORIA DE LOS ANGELES
* * * * * *

He has attained fame as the chief
exponent of George Gershwin's
music.
UNDER ITS new permanent
conductor, Rafael Kubelik, the
Chicago Symphony Orchestra will
bring the Extra Concert Series to
a close on March 9.
Lester McCloy, Associate Con-
ductor of the University Musical
Society, will lead the University
Choral Union and the Musical
Society Orchestra in two per-
formances of Handel's "Mes-
siah" on Dec. 8 and 9. Four so-
loists, outstanding in oratorio
work, will sing the solo roles--
Nancy Carr, soprano; Eunice
Alberts, contralto; David Lloyd
and Oscar Natzka, bass.
On February 15, 16 and 17, the
Budapest String Quartet composed
of Josef Roisman, Jac Gorodet-
zky, Boris Kroyt and Mischa
Schneider will perform in the 12th
annual Chamber Music Festival in
the Rackham Building Auditor-
ium.
The six concerts of the 59th an-
nual May Festival will be held on
May 1, 2, 3, and 4.
The tentative program thus far
includes Eugene Ormandy who
will conduct the Philadelphia Or-
chestra with Alexander Hilsberg
as associate conductor; Thor
Johnson as guest conductor of the
University Choral Union with Les-
,er McCoy as associate conductor;
and the Youth Chorus, Marguerite
Hood as conductor.

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
CONCERTS
73rd ANNUAL CHORAL UNION SERIES

:, ,,

II

1951-1952

VICTORIA

DE LOS ANGELES, Soprano

Thursday, October 4

Thor Johnson will bring his
Cincinnati -Symphony Orchestra
to Hill Auditorium on January
14 in their nationwide tour.
* * *
ON THEIR first American tour,
a group of 65 male singers from
Norway-known as the Singing
Boys of Norway-will be heard on
Feb. 20. The next concert of the
series will be given by the Robert
Shaw Chorale and Orchestra
making its Ann Arbor debut on
March 16.
The Choral Union Series will
be brought to a close on March
31, when the celebrated violin-
piano combination of Rudolf
Serkin and Adolf Busch pre-
sent a sonata recital.
For the sixth consecutive sea-

son, the University Musical So-
ciety will offer an Extra Concert
Series-which will consist of five
concerts.
* * *
GLADYS SWARTHOUT, mezzo-
soprano, will open the series on
Oct. 9. The Boston Symphony un-
der Charles Munch will appear in
Ann,Arbor for the second time on
Oct. 22. This concert, however,
will be entirely different from that
given in the Choral Union Series..
Making their first appear-
ance in Ann Arbor, the de Paur
Infantry Chorus conducted by
Leonard de Paur, will be heard
on Nov. 20.
Last heard at the May Festival
of 1944, Oscar Levant, well-known
pianist, will appear on January 18.

I

JOSEF SZ IGETI,

Violinist

. Monday, October

15

. . . . .

BOSTON SYMPHONY

ORCHE STRA

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor

. . Sunday, October 21

. .

. . . Sunday,

November 4

ALEXANDER
SA LVATOR E

BRA I LOWSKY, P ianist
BACCALONI, Bass .

Friday, November 16

. .

Thursday, November

29

_I

Opportunities
For Part-time

FOR FRESHMEN TOO:
Students Vie for A nnual
Avery Hopwood Prizes

Work Ample

I

Many University students pay
part or all of their expenses by
working during summers or while
they are in school and job oppor-
tunities for students wishing part
time work during the fall semester
are readily available through the
Personnel Office of the Univer-
sity.
The Personnel Office in the Ad-
ministration Building aids stu-
dents in need of work through
contact with local business es-
tablishments, individual house-
holders, and various departments
in the University.
s* * ,vw
A VARIETY of jobs, from soda-
fountain work to animal care will
be open, according to Mrs. Betty
Gauss, University personnel inter-
viewer, and students may begin
to apply at the office as soon as
they have registered. When their
class schedule is known, working
hours can be fitted into the stu-
dents' programs in the most con-
venient way possible, she said.
Students desiring work in dor-
mitories, fraternities, sororities, the
libraries, League, Union and var-
ios departmental offices, must
apply directly, as the Personnel
Office does not handle this type
of work.
"In fact," Mrs. Gauss said,
"about 75 per cent of our calls
are non-University, from local
businesses and householders."
This work includes gardening,
painting, sales work, gas-station
attendant and restaurant work.
Non-academic unskilled Univer-
sity jobs handled by the Office
include picture-hanging, grounds
labor, and animal caretaking.
Students are advised to budget
their time carefully so that Work-
ing will not interfere with their
academic work. "Dormitory em-
ployment is recommended for
freshmen, since it fits in with
their schedule, and makes use of
time which otherwise might be
' wasted," Mrs. Gauss said.

Since 1932, there has been a
special competition for freshmen
in the University's famed Avery
Hopwood Contest, although the
original awards were for upper-
classmen only.
Accordingly, incoming fresh-
men with literary aspirations will
have the opportunity, near the
end of their first semester at the
University, to display their talents
in competition for the Freshman
Avery Hopwood Awards.
* * *
PRIZES OF $50, $30, and $20
will be awarded winners of the
1951-52 freshman competition in
essay prose, fiction and poetry.
Upperclassmen will be able to
submit their manuscripts during
the spring semester in competi-
tion for the major and minor
Hopwood Awards.
Entries are judged by 'members
of the English department, and,
in the major spring contest, by
prominent American literary fig-
ures.
Directed by Prof. Roy W.
Cowden of the English depart-
ment, the Hopwood contests for
both freshmen and upperclass-
men allow a wide range of sub-
jects.
Originated by the will of the
late Avery Hopwood, '05, million-
aire playwright, the directors of
the contest were instructed it was
desired that "students competing
for the prizes shall not be con-
fined to academic subjects, but'
shall be allowed the widest pos-
sible latitude," and that the new
and the unusual should be es-
pecially encouraged.
Hopwood willed more than
$550,000' for prizes in the annual
Hopwood writing contests which
began for upperclassmen in 1931.
* * *
MANY OF THE well-known
modern writers got their start by
way of Hopwood awards. These
authors include Betty Smith, au-
thor of "A Tree Grows in Brook-
lyn." Miss Smith was one of the

1931 winners for a play entitled
"Francie Nolan," the character
who later became the heroine of
her famous novel.
Another of the winners who has
since climbed the ladder to suc-
cess is Arthur Miller, '38, who has
won the New York Critics Drama
Award twice. Miller also received
the Pulitzer prize in 1949 for
"Death of a Salesman."
Manuscripts of previous win-
ners are on file in Rm. 3227 An-
gell Hall, the Hopwood Room.
. Last spring, 14 University grad-
uate and undergraduate students
split $7,100 in prizes for fiction,
drama, poetry and the essay.
Student Radio
A student-operated radio net-
work broadcasts daily under the
banner of UWR, University Wired
Radio.

SL Tug Week
To Pit Frosht
AgainstSophs
Freshmen will get a chance to
show both their physical prowess
and their class spirit when the
Student Legislature stages "Tug
Week" early in the Fall.
"Tug Week" activities will be-
gin with class rallies for the
freshmen and sophomore stu-
dents. The campus's first musi-
cal show of the year, "Soph Sa-
tire," will behpresented at Hill
Auditorium and take a humorous
look at some phase of University
life.
Begun three years ago, "Tug
Week" derives its name from the
tug-of-war between the freshmen
and sophomores that winds up the
week's festivities. Picked teams
from bothhclasses will grunt and
groan as they attempt to pull the
other side into the cold and
muddy Huron River.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

THOR JOHNSON

, Conducto
NORWAY

CINCINNATI SYMPHONY

SINGING

BOYS OF

. Wednesday, February 20

ORCH ESTRA,

r

SHAW CHORALE AND ORCHESTRA

. . . .Monday, January

Tuesday,-March 18

14

s *

I;"

ADOLF BUSCH, Violinist, and
RUDOLF SERKI N, Pianist

Monday, March 31

. . . . . .

SEASON TICKETS (tax incl.) : Unclaimed seats in Block A, $16.80; Block B, $14.40; Block C, $12.00.
SIXTH ANNUAL EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

I'

GLADYS SWARTHOUT, Mezzo-Soprano
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor .
dePAUR'S INFANTRY CHORUS.
OSCAR LEVANT, Pianist, . . . .
CH ICA&O SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Tuesday, October 9

. Monday, October 22
Tuesday, November 20

"MMOMMOM-09

Q BREAKFAST
00
LUNCH
"4where students meet -oextadet
BETSY ROSS SHOP
in Nickels Arcade

11

. . Friday, January

18

[ It

.11

WU

RAFAEL KUBELIK, Conductor

Sunday,,March 9

. . . . .

SEASON TICKETS (tax incl.): Block A, $8.40; Block B, $7.20; Block C, $6.00.
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CONCERTS

I

1

III

11

"MESSIAH" (Handel) . .
Nancy Carr, Soprano
Eunice Alberts, Contralto
David Lloyd, Tenor

. . . . . December 8 and 9,
Oscar Natzka, Bass
Choral Union and Orchestra
Lester McCoy, Conductor

1951

il

1 1:

TICK(ETS (tax incl.) : 70c and 50c (either performance). On sale beginning October 15.

ii

jj:~

12th ANNUAL CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

Il _

BREAKFAST
LUNCH ...

7:00-10:00
11:00-1:30

BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET . . . February 15, 16,
Joseph Roisman, Violin Boris Kroyt, Viola
Jac Gorodetzky, Violin Mischa Schneider, Violoncello

17,

1952

11

I'

DINNER

SEASON TICKETS )(tax in.):$3.90 and $2.70. On sole beginning October 15.
59th ANNUAL MAY FESTIVAL

@ i 5:00-7:00

SIX CONCERTS . . .0...

. . . . . . May 1, 2, 3, 4,

1952

Try our Daily specials

The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, Conductor, and'
Alexander Hilsberg, Associate Conductor; University Choral
1 T..~... 1L," *. IrI-, - --.. -a. 1" .... -1.,4- . ...A 1 --.-- AA --------. I.

r III

I

III

I I

i fit

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan