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September 20, 1951 - Image 12

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Michigan Daily, 1951-09-20

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FOR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1951

11

The Campus Churches
Welcome You!
Activities for Orientation Week
and for Registration Weekend.. .

FOR STUDENT GROUPS:
Lane Hall is 'U' Religious Center
.S . . .* .S . . .

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Sunday, September 23
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Nursery for children during the service.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Paterson, Assistant
Tuesday Student Tea: 4:30 to 6:00 P.M., Guild
House.
Friday, September 21
6:00 P.M.: Dinner for New Students,
Memorial Christian Church.
Sunday, September 24
6:00 P.M.: Student supper and prograr,
Memorial Christian Church.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
Music: Wayne Dunlop, Howard R. Chase
Sunday, September 23
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Paterson, Assistant
Tuesday Student Tea: 4:30 to 6:00 P.M., Guild
House.
Friday, September 21
6:00 P.M.: Dinner for New Students,
Memorial Christian Church.
Sunday, September 24
6:00 P.M.: Student supper and program,
Memorial Christian Church.
YOUNG FRIENDS FELLOWSHIP
Lane Hall
Francis Evans, phone 2-8501
Marion Gyr, phone 2-2607
Sunday, September 23
11:00 A.M.: Worship Meeting, Lane Hall.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone 2-1121
Rev. Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
Friday, September 21
7:00-10:00 P.M.: Student Open House at
Grace Bible Church.
Sunday, September 23
10:00 A.M.: University Bible Class at Grace
Bible Church.
11:00 A.M.: Church Service.
6:15 P.M.: Grace Bible Church Guild (Cost
Supper served at the Church).
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.

EVANGELICAL AND REFORMED
STUDENT GUILD
Walter S. Press, Pastor and Student Counselor
Friday, September 21, 6:30 P.M.: Buffet Supper
at the home of Rev. and Mrs. Walter S. Press,
432 S. Fourth Ave.
Sunday, September 23, 6:30 P.M.: Guild Meeting
at Bethlehem Church, 423 S. Fourth Ave.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
AND STUDENT CENTER
Rabbi Herschel Lyman, Director of Student
Work
Monday, October 1 and Tuesday, October 2
Rosh Hashonah
Wednesday, October 10
6:30 P.M.: Yom Kippur services - Lydia
MendelssohndTheatre . Time of services to
be announced.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Upper Room, Lane Hall
Professor C. F. Kessler, Faculty Advisor
Tuesdays-7:30 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Student Center-1304 HiltStreet
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Friday, September 21
7:30 P.M.: Social Evening at the new Stu-
dent Center.
Sunday, September 23
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Services - Zion Church (E.
Washington & S. Fifth Ave.) Trinity
Church (E. William & S. Fifth Ave.)
5:30 P.M.: Lutheran Student Assn. Meeting
at the new Student Center at the corner of
Hill and Forest.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
218 North Division St. Phone 2-4097
Rev. Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
Wednesday, September 19
7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion followed by
student breakfast.
Friday, September 21
4:00-6:00 P.M.: Tea and Open House.
6:00 P.M.: Supper for Freshmen and Trans-
fer Students at Parish House. Meet at
Canterbury House, 218 N. Division.
Sunday, September 23
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion followed by
Student Breakfast.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club.

By HARRIET TEPPERMAN
The Student Religious Associa-
tion will soon inaugurate another
semester's program of religious
and social activities.
Housed in Lane Hall, SRA in-
cludes the interests of all faiths
and cultures on campus and is
the central organization for 21
religious groups.
ALL UNIVERSITY students are
entitled to participate in the As-
sociation's activities and to use
the facilities of Lane Hall-its
library, music room, auditorium,
k it c h e n, meeting rooms and
lounge.
SRA's program is student-
created by the various depart-
ments in the organization:
study and discussion; social ac-
tion; public relations; intercul-
tural; social and recreational;
outstate; and relief.
Combined activities of the de-
partments include luncheon-dis-
cussions, religious seminars, par-
ticipation in campus politics and
community service projects, radio
workshop broadcasts, intercultur-
al "retreats," Friday coffee hours,
orientation week program, work
with community centers and
churches in other parts of the
state and relief projects such as
World Student Service Fund and
other campus drives.
* * *
USHERING IN the fall activi-
ties will be a Student Religious
Association fall retreat which will
be held Saturday, Sunday and
Monday, Sept. 15, 16, and 17 at
the Detroit Recreation Camp near
Brighton.
The two-fold purpose of the
retreat is to provide an oppor-
tunity for the cabinet members
of each religious group to meet
and plan their coming year's
program as well as to bring stu-
dent leaders of all campus reli-
gious groups together for train-
ing in leadership techniques.
The guest speaker and leader
for the group in the leadership
techniques has not yet been an-
nounced by the SRA.
* * *
THE FRESHMAN Rendezvous
will be held Sept. 14, 15 and 16
at the Detroit Recreation Camp
near Brighton. Bus transportation
will be provided.
The purpose of the Lane Hall
Freshman Rendezvous is to of-
fer opportunities for freshmen
to form friendships with faculty
members and older students who
are leaders in religious activi-
ties on the campus. The Ren-
dezvous will have facilities for
about 125 freshmen and 25 stu-
dent counselors and faculty
members. Each freshman will
pay a registration fee of $6.50.
Dean Erich Walter, Dean De-
borah Bacon, DeWitt C. Baldwin,
Director of Lane Hall, and other
members of the University fa-
culty will lead the discussions.
THERE ARE 21 student religi-
ous groups at the University. They
sponsor a wide variety of activi-
ties-discussions, worship, picnics,
intramural athletics, hikes, dan-
ces, social and political action,
Bible study, drama and music.
Most of the groups have pro-
fessionally trained leaders who
serve as religious counselors to
the students.
"-
THE NEWMAN CLUB is the
campus organization of Catholic
students. It is part of St. Mary's
Student Chapel, which is under
the guidance of The Rev., Fr.
Frank J. McPhillips.
The Newman Club's program
in clu d e s various discussion
groups on Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday nights. Weekly
devotions are held on Wednes-
day evening, and Friday and
Saturday nights are open hous-
es. Christmas and St. Patrick's

-Daily-Bob Keith
ONE BLOCK NORTH OF THE CAMPUS ON STATE STREET IS LANE HALL, HEADQUARTERS
FOR STUDENT RELIGIOUS GROUPS.

* * * r
Day parties highlight the social
activities.t
The club also sponsors frequent
communion breakfasts to which
it invites guest speakers.
* * *
B'NAI B'RITH Hillel Founda-;
tion serves as the religious center+
for Jewish students at the Uni-
versity.
Under the direction of Rabbi
Hershel Lymon, the group spon-
sors forums, religious activities,
welfare drives, and publication
of the Hillel News. It also of-
fers a program of lectures, so-
cials, and Friday evening serv-
ices.
Topping Hillel's year is its an-
nual musical revue, Hillelzapop-
pin'. A chapter of the Intercol-
legiate Zionist Federation of Am-
erica is active at Hillel.
Temporarily situated at Lane
Hall, the Hillel Foundation is now
in the process of building a mo-
dern new building. The structure
itself will be finished by the be-
ginning of the fall semester, and
members anticipate a grand op-
ening near the end of the semes-
ter.
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Organization has its headquar-
ters at Lane Hall and holds meet-
ings every Tuesday evening.
Among its activities it spon-
sors two lectures on Christian
Science each year.
The organization keeps a read-
ing room off the Lane Hall li-
brary.
GRACE BIBLE Student Group
is under the supervision of The
Rev. Harold J. DeVries, pastor of
the Grace Bible Church.
* * *
THE UNITARIAN student group
under the direction of Rev. Ed-
ward H. Redman, sponsors a pro-
gram of discussions and forums
on the important social, political,
and campus issues of the day.
Social action projects are oc-
casionally undertaken in cooper-
ation with the other religious
groups.
S - * * *
INTER-GUILD is a student or-
ganization which integrates the
activities of most of the Protes-
tant religious groups, or "guilds,"
on campus and promotes coopera-
tion between them.
* * *
THE ROGER WILLIAMS Guild,
affiliated with the First Baptist
Church, is under the direction of
The Rev. C. H. Loucks and his as-
sistant, Faith Whithall.
Guild activities include Sunday
Bible study and supper discus-
sions, and a Friday social func-
tion.
Ef* *
EVANGELICAL and Reformed

* * * 4
Student Guild meets every Sunday
evening for supper, discussion and
fellowship.
The program is student planned
with the help of The Rev. Walter
S. Press, student counselor and
associate pastor of the Bethlehem
Church.
* * *
THE CHINESE Students' Chris-
tian Association in North America
has a chapter at Lane Hall.
It is organized by Chinese stu-
dents for the purpose of promot-
ing mutual understanding and
friendship between American and
Chinese students.
CONGREGATIONAL - Disciples
Guild is composed of students
from Congregational and Disciples
of Christ churches.
Sunday evening meetings in-
clude Fellowship Supper, follow-I
ed by a program of speakers,
panels, student discussions, for-
ums and worship services.
Week-day activities of the group
include Tuesday tea, discussion
groups, and social functions. Di-
rector of the guild is The Rev. H.
L. Pickerill.
CANTERBURY CLUB is the
Episcopal student foundation on
the campus.
The guild works under the
leadership of The Rev. John H.
Burt.
Communion breakfasts, Sunday
evening meetings, and Friday Op-
en Houses are featured in the
Group's program.
THE ANN ARBOR Friends
Meeting has its headquarters at
Lane Hall.
In addition to worship meet-
ings, it holds frequent work par-
ties to prepare clothing and other
material for the American Friends
Service Committee foreign relief
program.
THE ORTHODOX Students So-
ciety was established for all Greek
Orthodox students on the campus.
Under the guidance of Dr. S.
M. Sophocles, the group holds
Wednesday evening open house
and sponsors religious, educa-
tional and social programs.
* *. *
THE LUTHERAN Student As-
sociation is the local unit of the
National Lutheran Council, and
is under the direction of The Rev.
Henry 0. Yoder.
The group meets every Sun-
day evening and holds Tuesday
evening discussions, Wednesday
Coffee Hours, and weekend so-
cial events.
Gama Delta is the Lutheran
Student Club. The group is part
of an all-student congregation
under the supervision of The Rev.
Alfred Scheips. Activities of the

* * *
guild include Sunday Bible class,
evening supper and program.
* * *
THE MICHIGAN Christian Fel-
lowship, affiliated with the In-
tervarsity Christian Fellowship, is
an organization of Protestant
students who subscribe to the
faith of historic Christianity.
Activities of the group include
weekly Sunday program and tea,
Wednesday Bible study, and such
social events as parties, picnics,
and hikes.
THE STUDENTS' Evangelical
Chapel is organized chiefly of
Christian Reformed students.
* * *
WESLEYAN GUILD has plan-
ned its 151-52 program around the
theme "Developing Christian At-
titudes and Social Action."
The Methodist guild is under
the guidance of The Rev. James
Brett Kenna. Activities of the
group include Sunday evening
supper and fellowship, Wednes-
day tea, and Friday recreation.
Serving Presbyterian students
on campus is Westminster Stu-
dent Guild. The group holds a
student seminar in religion, a
Sunday evening fellowship meet-
ing, Wednesday tea, and a Friday
social. The Rev. William H. Hen-
derson is advisor to the guild.
* * *
Three new student religious
groups have become members of
the Student Religious Association
and will begin functioning in the
fall. They are the Nazarine, the
Free Methodists, and the Latter
Day Saints.

International
Center Plays
Essential Role
The International Center is
Michigan's haven for foreign stu-
dents, where all can associate witti
each other on the ground of their
common interests.'
Founded in 1938 for the purpose
of bringing together foreign and
American students and faculty,
the Center is headed by Esson M.
Gale, director and counselor, and
Robert Klinger, assistant counse-
lor.
'IlE PROGRAM of the Center
offers a wide range of activities-
social, recreational, and education-
al.
Each week there is a Sunday
evening program which includes
a foreign meal and a political
round-table. On Thursday af-
ternoon, the customary event
is a social tea.
A variety of other activities are
announced from week to week on
the bulletin board of the Center.
The University radio station,
WUOM, frequently carries round-
table discussions.
* *
IN ADDITION, excursions and
tours are organized to acquaint
the students with the campus, the
municipal features of Ann Arbor,
and its environs in the most 'm-
portant industrial areas of Michi-
gan. Such tours may include trips
to the Jackson Prison, the Kaiser-
Frazer automobile factories, and
the General Motors factories.
It is customary that a foreign
student reception is held in the
Rackham Amphitheatre at the
beginning of the semester, in
order to acquaint the students
with the Center.
To aid the foreign students, a
system of counseling has been es-
tablished whereby vocational ad-
vice, orientation suggestions, and
direct help in immigration prob-
lems - visas and working per-
mits - are given.
THE ENGLISH Language Insti-
tute, along with other language
services, is one of the Center's
mostcimportant aids in helping
foreign students make the often
difficult adjustment to their new
work in a strange land.
The Center seeks to orient the
student to American customs
with specific reference to his
own special field of study.
Adjuncts of the International
Center are the various foreign stu-
dents' clubs which are designed to
acquaint each student with other
students of his own nationality.
Each club sends a delegate to the
annual conference of the Interna-
tional Student Association.
To augment the program, exten-
sive recreational arrangements are
provided. They include dances,
parties, picnics, special movies, mu-
sic programs and aunletic events.
The Center staff places specil
emphasis on events which will
help foreign students to make Am-
erican friends.

RENTAL COLLECTION:

Student Loan Prints Feature
Moderns, Masters in Painting

Whether you are a world fa-
mous art expert or the type of1
person who selects art prints ac-
cording to the amount of wall
space and the color scheme of
your room, you can find the dash
of color needed to brighten up
your walls among the 800 prints
in the Student Loan Print Col-
lection.
Framed reproductions of oil
and water color paintings are
available to any student at ai
rental fee of 50 cents per printi
per semester.1
*, * *
THE PRINTS are placed on ex-
hibit during orientation week and'
students may list their choices in
order of their preferences the sec-
ond week of school. First come,;
first served is the rule for dis-
tributing the prints and students

who delay making their choice
may have to be satisfied with less
preferred prints.
Students may only rent one
print at the beginning of the
semester but they will be al-
lowed to make a second choice
from the prints which remain
after the signing up period is
over.
Students seem to favor the Im-
pressionists and this preference is
considered when making additions
to the collection, which at present
includes popular works by Renoir,
Degas, Van Gogh, and Picasso as
well as the old masters of Europe.
Student rental fees alone have
increased the collection by nearly
200 prints since it was inaugurat-
ed. Fees are also used for fram-
ing and repairs.

:1

MEDCAL ..

DENTAL

. . . PUBLIC HEALTH

BOOKS and SUPPLIES
Our store is especially equipped with text-
books, reference books and supplies for Med-
ical, Dental and Public Health Students.
VETERANS' ACCOUNTS CAPABLY HANDLED

U.. E'S GLEE CLUB

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