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September 20, 1951 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-20

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4

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1951 THE MTCHITAN DATTX

PAGE TIMER

.A i1 l.:I i V111VRA Lt311I1

PAGE THREE

Scholarships
Aid Students
Attending 'U'
Semester Fees
Paid for Many
University students who are un-
derwriting their own education
are often provided financial as-
sistance under the conditions of
one of the numerous fellowships
and scholarships offered each year
by the University.
Most of these, however, are not
available to freshmen, according
to Ivan W. Parker, secretary of
the Committee on University
Scholarships. Among those that
can be secured by deserving fresh-,
men are the LaVerne Noyes and
Regents-Alumni scholarships and
the Horace H. Rackham under-
graduate scholarships, Parker said.
CONSTITUTING over 50 per
cent of the total number of awards
made, the Regents-Alumni schol-
arships cover cost of semester fees
and are awarded to freshmen be-
fore they come to the University.
To be eligible, students must
have ranked in the upper third
of their graduating class, demon-
strate interest in further educa-
tion, be in good health and have
need of financial aid. Applicants
must be graduates of accredited
Michigan high schools.
These scholarships are renew-
ed if the student maintains a
satisfactory academic average.
Each case is given individual at-
tention to determine whether
or not the students record war-
rants renewal, Parker said.
The LaVerne Noyes awards are
offered to students in need of as-
sistance, who either served in the
Army or Navy in World War I
and were honorably discharged or
who are descended by blood from
someone who served. The enlist-
ment on which the application is
based must have been prior to
May 11, 1918, unless there was
overseas service before the Armis-
tice.
About twenty-five of these schol-
arships are awarded each semes-
ter; and cover semester fees. Stu-
dents who are eligible may apply
at the scholarships division of the
Office of Student Affairs before
Aug. 1 and Dec. 1 of the first and
second semesters respectively.

A Serious Conversation in Nichols Arboretum

MUSICAL ROUND-UP:
Marching Band Famed for Drill-Work

The fast - stepping Michigan
Marching Band will move onto
the football field within a few
weeks in a sparkling display of
the precision drill work and mu-
sicianship which has brought the
organization fame and high re-
spect throughout the nation.
Students and thousands of other
loyal fans will again be treated
with an afternoon of intricate
formations and inspiring playing
as the band opens a new year of
typically credible accomplishment
in the realm of University musi-
cal presentation.
THE MARCHING BAND is but
one of the high-calibre student in-
strumental music groups which
perform here under the able baton
of Prof. William Revelli and his
assistant, Jack Lee.

Though perhaps less spectacu-
lar,' the Michigan Symphony
Band, which takes over the
spotlight after the end of the
football season, is of comparable
musical stature and its concerts
in Ann Arbor and elsewhere
have thrilled thousands.
Augmenting the two top-rank-
ing groups is the Varsity Band
which performs at several con-
certs and at home basketball
games.
The Varsity .Band's emphasis,
however, is on experience rather
than actual performance as it
serves as a training ground for
students working their way into
the Symphony and Marching
bands, according to Lee.
The University's bands function
as extra-curricular activities un-

der direction of members of the
Music School faculty.
* * *
BECAUSE of a new change in
University policy, all first semester
freshmen will be eligible to take
part in band activities this fall for
the first time in recent years.
Assistant director Lee has
asked all students interested in
band participation to contact
him immediately at the band
headquarters in Harris Hall.
The 100 piece Symphony Band
opens its ranks to women and
differs somewhat in size and in-
strumentation from the Marching
Band.
The bands will receive a special
token of distinction this fall with
the release of an R.K.O. Pathe
movie of their activities.

as extra-curricular activities un- movie of their activities.

IF YOU WRITE
Student and Office Supplies
Typewriters and Fountain Pens
Loose Leaf Notebooks
Fluorescent Lamps
3rief Cases

WE HAVE

IT!

all makes of
PORTABLES

-Daily-James Butt
THE SPACIOUS UNIVERSITY-OWNED NICHOLS ARBORETUM IS AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS BENT ON TAKING A LEISURE-
LY STROLL, OR OTHER TIME-OUT FROM CLASSROOM STUDIES
$6,500,000 RESEARCH:
'U' Phoenix Project Swells Fund for Atom Study

d *1 FFR

Craftsman
Ensemble
Pen 3.50
Pencil 3.00
Complete 6.50
(No federal tax)

" Srmth-Corona
* Royal
* Remington
* Hermes
We specialize in Repair Work
on Typewriters and Fountain Pens
G.I. requisitions accepted for
supplies only.

I-

Since
1908

M OBBILL' S

Phone
7177

THE HORACE H. Rackham
Scholarship Fund offers many
scholarships for both undergrad-
uates and graduate students.
The Rackham Fund for Under-
graduate Scholarships annually
awards a limited number of fresh-
men scholarships for men, prefer-
ably Michigan residents.
Rackham awards on the grad-
uate level include the 10 Predoc-
toral Fellowships of $1,500 for
exceptional graduate students
and the Post-doctoral Fellow-
ships, awards of $2,500 made
annually to Doctors of Philos-
ophy or Science for research.
The Special Fellowships are
awarded to exceptionally prom-
ising graduate students whose
graduate studies were interrupt-
ed by the war and can present
evidence of fruitful experience
during the war period.
In addition, the University Gen-
eral Scholarship Fund provides aid
in the various colleges in the Uni-
versity. These are administeredE
by the individual colleges and are;
awarded on the basis of academic
record and individual need.,

3
C
i
t
r
0
p
p

In the six years since the gia
atomic mushroom rose over a g
ted Hiroshima, the Universit3
$6,500,000 Phoenix Project h
achieved life and strength.
Designed to turn the tablesc
the atomic bomb and find co
structive uses for its enormo
power, the idea of the Phoen
Project was accepted by the St
dent Legislature as a way to ma
the University's war "memori
more than "a mound of stone 5so
to be forgotten."
The idea caught the imagin
tion of people all over the wor
and was hailed as one of t1
brightest spots in atomic enerE
research.
* . .
THE PHOENIX Project is nam
ed afte rthe Phoenix bird whic
according to legend, is reborn fro
its own ashes every 500 years an
rises with its youth and strengt
restored.
It is hoped that from the ruin
and ashes of Hiroshima and Naga
saki, the Phoenix Project will ris
bringing ne wand powerful peac
time uses of atomic energy.
In early 1948 the Project in-
tending to put the atom to work
for peace got the sanction of
the Atomic Energy Commission.
With this impetus a world-wide
campaign to raise $6,500,000 was
begun.
By the time the fund campaig
nded last June an impressive re
earch program was already un
derway on campus and plans for;
giant research building were wait
ng the approval of the Regent
who are expected to act on then
in the Fall.
Student contributions to th
Phoenix Project totaled over $160,
00 and campaign officials antici
)ate that additional donations an(
roceeds from Project work wil

nt'
it-
Y's
as
on
,n-
us
ix
u-
ke
al
a-
ld
he
gy
n-

tion self-sustaining within the
next 10 years.
A CAMPAIGN spokesman said
that there will probably be no
effort to bring new classes into
the drive for Phoenix funds but
added that no contributions from
interested freshmen will be re-
fused.
The Phoenix Project is not just
a good idea for a war memorial, it
is a "natural" for the University
because Michigan has been a cen-
ter of atomic research since the:
1920s and was chief purchasing
agent for the Manhattan Project
during the war.
A summer symposium onI
atomic energy that brought such

famous research men as J.
Robert Oppenheimer, A. H.
Compton, Lawrence Condon,
Enrico Fermi to the campus in
1923 has been followed through
the years with seminars and
convocations that confirm the
appropriateness of centering the
Phoenix Project at the Univer-
sity.
In addition to regular scientific
work on atomic energy, the Uni-
versity has provided important
figures in the development of the
country's atomic potential.
Dean. Ralph A. Sawyer of the
graduate school supervised the
work of 500 scientists at the Bi-
kini A-bomb tests.
And Dean George Granger

Brown, of the College of Engi-
neering, is director of the Atomic
Energy Commission's Division of
Engineering.
Besides providing scientists for
atomic research, the University
had, until 1936, the world's larg-
est cyclotron, which produced over
100 rare isotopes.
** *
COUNTLESS questions and
problems are hoped to be solved
by the research to be done by
the Phoenix Project. Some of
them are these: the causes and
cures of cancer, leukemia, arthri-
tis, rheumatic fever, and polio;
the manner in which disease-caus-
ing viruses reproduce, and their
control; the improvement of farm
land and agricultural techniques.

Attention Students
SCHOOL OPENING SPECIALS

314 South State Street
THE TYPEWRITER AND STATIONERY

STORE

I

SEVERAL of the housing units
in the dormitory system includ-
ing Betsy Barbour, Helen New-
berry, Mosher Hall, Martha Cook
and Adelia Cheever dormitories
for women, have scholarship funds
for residents, as do many fraterni-
ties and sororities.

S
t
{
X

make the whole Phoenix opera

;h . .. ... ...................::::.:. .
m ......E
a-
t,
e- ,nC' t
k0
n
- "
a (
suan
m_
d
l
I
, M
offers you all the things our clown lists plus rmany more. To keep
up on the latest in Campus, National, and International News sub
scribe to the college paper.

$500 Down Delivers the

chase this new ROYAL.
$82.50 & $92.50 plus taxes
HEADQUARTERS for PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
ALL TYPEWRITERS ARE "FAIR TRADED"
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get the advantage of our guarantee -and convenient service.
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NEW 1951 ROYAL, PORTABLE

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$20 Trade-in Sale
Your old portable regardless
of age or condition (4 row
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is worth $20 when you pur-

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TYPEWRITER ... WE GUARANTEE ALL
REPAIR WORK . . . TWO-DAY SERVICE

4:

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All Kinds of Gifts and Novelties... and
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