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September 20, 1951 - Image 16

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-20

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I - MMMM9

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, I95I

PAGE EIGHT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1951

STAFF ADVISERS:
Counseling Service
Helps 'U' Students

University Campus as Seen from the Air

Freshmen and upper classmen
can find solution to all kinds of
problems academic, emotional,
vocational -- in the University's
well-integrated "referral" counsel-
ing system.
This system, which makes the
University seem not-so-large after
all, is divided into two general ca-
tegories: one consisting of those
counseling services with which all
students come into contact upon
entrance into the University; and
the other comprising more special-
ized services having staffs of
trained personnel to help students
with special problems.
What molds the individual coun-
seling services into a network is
the referral system, whereby each
counseling agency has on tap the
services of the others.
THE FIRST counselors the en-
tering student encounters are the
residence hall advisers.
In the men's dormitories, a
system known as the Michigan
House Plan has been in effect
for the last decade. Heading the
plan are three resident direc-
tors, one for each Quadrangle.
The Quads are divided into
houses, each house having a resi-
dent adviser, an associate adviser
and several staff assistants.
THE RESIDENT ADVISER is
usually of the teaching-fellow lev-
el and is in charge of academic
counseling. The associate adviser
is a woman, serving more or less in
the capacity of the traditional
"house mother" and guiding the
social activities of the dormitory.
Handling the general counsel-
ing are the staff assistants, who,
for the most part, are graduate
students. Theyare apportioned
one to every 20 to 25 men.
"The great value of the men's
residence counseling system is its
help in breaking down the imper-
sonal feeling that can be so easily
given by a large University," John
Bingley, resident director of the
East Quad, explained.
All three of the University's men
residence halls--West Quad, East
Quad and South Quad are operat-
ed under this plan. Fletcher Hall,
a smaller dorm is also under the
plan.
*. * *
THE WOMEN'S residences have
a similar system of counseling,
consisting of graduate counselors
assigned to specific dormitories.

The number of students to each
counselor varies from house to
house depending on the size of the
house.
The counselors, who work in
conjunction with the house di-
rectors and dormitory nurses, go
through a pre-orientation in-
training each semester.
Part of the purpose of the
training is to inform the counsel-
ors of the various referal coun-
seling agencies on campus. They
then can act as "liaison" officers
between dormitory life and other
phases of the students' University
experience.
IT IS THE JOB of every coun-
selor to help with whatever th
house director delegates to her.
She interprets League and Assem-
bly activities, and, like the men
counselors, tries to remedy the
students' feeling of being lost in a
large residence group.
One of the chief advantages of
having counselors is their "acces-
sibility," according to Mrs. Sarah
Healy, associate dean of women.
"So often the students feel that
their problem is too minor to bo-
ther the house director with. In
those cases they can easily ask the
advice of the counselors.
', * ,
AT THE OUTSET of orientation
week, all incoming freshmen and
sophomores are assigned in groups
of 20 to 25 to an academic coun-
selor, who helps them in assuring
satisfaction of the basic academic
requirements.
Although most of the students
have planned out a tentative
program, they frequently elect
subjects for which they are not
eligible. It is the job of the aca-
demic counselors to iron out any
such difficulties.
Regular counselors are also pre-
sent at registration to help stu-
dents with unforeseen "conflicts"
that might arise in classifying.
* * *
AS SOON AS the semester be-
gins, the academic counselors hold
interviews with those students
who they fear have had inade-
quate preparation for the subjects
they have elected. If the student
is having trouble in maintaining
the level of the course, an adjust-
ment is made in his program.
At the end of five weeks,
grades are mailed out to all
freshmen by the counselors, who

'U' Loan Fund
Gives Students
Financial Aid
Among the numerous aids avail-
able to University students under-
writing their own education is the
Student Loan Fund.
Deserving students may apply
for the loans, which are provided
by alumni, educational organiza-
tions, and other groups interested
in aiding students.
MORE THAN 2,200 loans, rang-
ing from $25 to $500 were made to
University students last year, ac-
cording to the Office of Student
Affairs.
The loans are made in accord-
ance with conditions established
by the donors and rules and regu-
lations adopted by the Board of
Regents for the administration of
the funds.
In charge of administration of
the loan funds is the Committee
on Student Loans, which con-
sists of Dean of Students Erich
A. Walter, Dean of Women De-
borah Bacon and two represen-
tatives for the Business Office of
the University.
Students may apply for loans at
the Office of the Dean of Women
or the Office of Student Affairs.
To be eligible for a student loan,
he must have completed one se-
mester of work at the University,
unless the circumstances are ex-
traordinary, in which case an ex=
ception to the regulation may be
made.
LOOK
at
STUDENT SPECIALS
on
page 2

AIR VIEW OF CAMPUS-The University is situated in the middle of Ann Arbor,
on the dividing line between the rolling hills to the west and the flat, glaciated
plain stretching away to the Great Lakes. The cluster of neo-Gothic buildings
in the center of the picture is the Law School. Running along beside it, north
and south, is State Street, main artery for the campus area. On the left are
grouped the West Quad, Michigan Union and Administration Bldg. North of the

Law School on State Street is the center of the campus, containing Angell Hall
(distinguished by its huge columns), home of the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts; the Natural Science Bldg. and, in the center, the General Library.
Further north is the carillon tower. In the background rises the mammoth Uni-
versity hospital, with the smokestacks of the heating plant on one side and tl.w
women's dormitories on the other.

mlvlmm L

I

I

include an invitation to come inl
for an interview.,
This same procedure is used
with unsatisfactory midterm grad'
with unsatisfactory (D or E) mnid-
term grades. These grades, unlike
the five-week marks, however, are
sent home, and the office of the'
counselors is often beseiged with7
letters from anxious parents.
In the second semester of the
freshman year the same pattern
is followed, but in the sophomore
year, students are "on their own"
and the chief job of the counse-
lors is approving their elections.
** *
PROF. ARTHUR Van Duren,
chairman of the academic coun-
selors, emphasized the importance
of 'the academic counselor's job.;
"The vast majority of students
know what they want to do, but
most of them don't end up by do-,
ing it.
"The academic counselor has#
to hit the balance of not dis-
couraging the student, but at'
the same time pointing out all
the avenues of study open to
him."
The academic counselors work7
in close collaboration with other1
counseling units on campus, fort
as Prof. Van Duren explained, "a1
student's academic problems are
frequently related to other prob-
1 1
Students Rate
FacultyYearly
A turnabout takes place in the1
literary college each year, when
the students get a chance to eval-
uate their teachers by means of
special questionnaires.'
Last spring they were generous
on the whole andgave the faculty
especially high ratings on their
"general approachability and will-
ingness to assist students."l
Receiving special plaudits were
the humanities and social sciences,
while history was placed at the
top.
On the other end of the scale,
they said that some of the faculty
had failed to "arouse interest and
stimulate thinking."

11

lems, and we can act as a referral
agency."
The office of the academic
counselors is located in Rm. 1210,
Angell Hal.
WHEN THE STUDENT has
completed his sophomore year, his
records are transferred to the of-
fice of concentration advisers, Rm.j
1006 Angell Hall.
Like the academic counselors,
the major job of the concentra-
tion advisers is to help the stu-
dent see that the requirements
in his field of concentration are
filled. However, the advisers do
not tell the students what cours-
es to elect, Prof. Benjamin W.
Wheeler, chairman of the con-
centration advisers, emphasized.
"It is the responsibility of the
student to see that his elections
program takes in all the necessary
courses.''
Prof. Wheeler will be absent on
leave for the first semester of the
1951-52 academic year and his
duties will be handled by Prof.
Willima Palmer.
,T *
STUDENTS UNCERTAIN of the
field in which they would like to
major can get advice and sugges-
tions from Prof. Palmer. Upon
choosing a field of concentration,
they make appointments with the
advisers in that field.
The concentration advising sys-
tem is now operating under a new
arrangment iniated in the fall
of 1949, whereby the majority of
the counselors are located in one
office, making the services of each
department more easily available
to the other departments and to
the students.
Supplementing the academic
counselors is the Bureau of Psy-
chological Services, in the old RO-
TC Building between the Union
and the Administration Building,
which aids students in the field of
vocational guidance and the eval-
uation of special psychological
problems.
The aim of the Bureau, accord-
ing to its director Prof. Edward S.
SBordin,,is not so much to help the
student find "the answer" but to
contribute to his educational de-
velopment by giving him training
in handling his own decisions.
STUDENTS ALSO participate in
the work of counseling along aca-
demic lines. A program of student
advisors, composed of concen-
trates in the various fields of the
literary college, the business ad-
ministration school and the edu-
cation school is held during the
early part of orientation week
each semester, under the sponsor-

ship of the Student Legislature
and the literary college.
The program, which empha-
sizes .course and program con-
tent, interest and vocational ob-
jectives, helps take the burden
off the academic counselors, and
gives the students a chance to
get some "off the record" tips
on various courses and fields.
Students may consult the ad-
visors from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday
(Sept. 18-20) in Rm. 25 Angell
Hall.
FURTHER supplementing theI
counseling plan, the mental hygi-
ene division of the Health Service
assists students in an entirely con-
fidential, friendly manner, to cor-
rect faulty social adjustments, to
acquire proper study habits, or to
overcome worries over personal
and family troubles when suchj
situations are interfering with
normal success in their studies. It
also deals with nervous reactions
or problems when they occur.
With referrals from all coun-
seling units on campusdas well as
from house directors, deans, phy-
sicians, and parents, the mental
hygiene Civision serves any stu-
dent in the University who desires
assistance. (See Health Service
article for additional information
on the mental hygiene division.)

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HINDEMITH: SONATA FOR BASSOON & PIANO;
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KODALY: SONATA FOR UNACCOMPANIED
CELLO: Janos Starker, cello.
Period SPLP-510............................$5.95
LAUDATE DOMINUM: GREGORIAN CHANT:
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Columbia ML-4394............. .............$5.45
MOZART: SYMPHONIES No. ?8 & No. 25:
Munich Philharmonic Orchestra.
Mercury MG-10032....... ..............,...$4.85

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