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September 29, 1951 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-29

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1951

T HE ,MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TI4REt

Reynolds Hurls No-Hitter;

Ya n ksli nchPennant

Y

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

* * *

Wolverines, MSC Tan

* * *

* * *

Conference
Teams Open
Grid Season
Illini Play UCLA;
Bucks Test SMU
CHICAGO-)-The Big Ten
launches its 1951 football cam-
paign today with a nine-game
' schedule almost completely devoid
of the traditional opening "brea-
ther."
No fewer than four Conference
contenders are rated underdogs in
their inaugurals. These include
Minnesota, against Washington at
Minneapolis; Indiana at Notre
Dame; Purdue, against Texas at
Lafayette; and Michigan, against
Michigan State, at Ann Arbor.
A * * *
TROUBLE MAY be lurking for
Illinois, against UCLA, at Cham-
paign; Ohio State, versus South-
ern Methodist, at Columbus; and
Northwestern, clashing with Colo-
rado at Evanston.
The form sheet promises fair-
ly easy going only for Wisconsin
against Marquette at Madison
and Iowa, host to Kansas State.
Ohio State, under new coach
Woody Hayes, has been rated by
Conference coaches as the No. 1
championship contender. The
Buckeyes, however, may have
their hands full again facing the
Mustangs who smothered them
with passes last season for a 32-
27 win.
Purdue's Dale Samuels may
be able to pass Purdue's uncer-
tain Boilermakers to a tumbling
of Texas, though the Longhorns
are fresh from a 7-6 win over
powerful Kentucky,
Indiana's fine Hoosier team,
plagued by a back-breaking
schedule, may pay the price if it
goes all-out against unseasoned,
but spirited Notre Dame. In-
diana later must face Michigan,
Ohio State, Illinois, Wisconsin
and Michigan State.
ILLINOIS has one of its tough-
est opening foes in years against
UCLA. The Illini will have a
fine attack if sophomore Tommy
O'Connell can handle the throt-
tle at quarterback.
Wes Fesler, who switched
from Ohio State-where the
howl of the grandstand wolves
got him down-to Minnesota,
will have a relaxed Gopher
team, but the talent may be
lacking to spill jaunty Wash-
ington.
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(Continued from Page 1)
(Cniudfo-ae1 uled for two-way duty to anchor '
I the Michigan forward wall when
kSonny' Grandelius, at left half- the Spartans have the ball. Bernie
back, and Vince Pisano, veteran Pederson will join him at tackle.
take Bnson ewing. s d dt Russ Osterman and Bob Ding-
Wayne Benson is scheduled to man are the defending guards,
start at fullback and he has an and Wolverine linebackers will
equally able substitute in Dick be Roger Zatkoff and Ted Topor,
both standouts in that assign-
Up front on offense will be ment.
Captain Carey at left end, prob- A variety of backs may see ac-
ably the most formidable scoring tion on pass defense but Howell
threat on his team, and his and Dave Tinkham should mon- I
brother Bill at right end. opolize the secondary with Perrv

Dodgers Lose to Phils,
Share Lead With Giants
Jones' Clutch Hit in Ninth Breaks Deadtock;
Teams All Even With Two Games To Play

t
I'

Don Coleman and Mary McFad
den are the starting tackles, an
the combination of Dean Garne
s and Frank Kapral will plug up
holes at guard. The pivot man wi]
be Dick Tamburo.
BOTH TEAMS are rated high
defensively, with Johnson sched

- in the safety slot.
SET TO GO for State is a com-
r plete defensive platoon which held
p Oregon scoreless last week. The
likely candidates are ends Ed Luke
and Orlando Mazza, tackles Bill
I Horrell and Pete Knezevich and
guards Dick Kuh and Frank Kush.I
-' Linebackers are Bill Hughes
and Ed Timmerman with Ray
1 Vogt and Art Ingram slated for
the secondary. Jimmy Ellis,

AL DOROW
. . . passing ace

VINCE PISANO
. . . driving runner

NEB' ANGLES DISCU

SSED:

Colleges Consider Grid De-Emphasis

I
r
4
I

By WILL GRIMSLEY
NEW YORSl-(MP)-College cam-
puses across the nation rumbled
today with talk of deemphasizing
football, but there was no stampede
to get into the act.
For every institution wanting to
cut down this multi-million-dollar
Saturday afternoon giant, there
were three preferring to keep their
high-salaried coaches, subsidizing
halfbacks and vast arenas.
*, * *
THIS WAS indicated in a cross-
country poll by the Associated
Press which asked the big time
colleges the simple question: What
are you doing to deemphasize
football?
Forty of them replied, "No-
thing."
Thirteen advocated changes
designed to return the sport to a
strictly simon-pure basis, with
no proselyting, no spring train-
ing and no post-season games.
At least two dozen others de-
clined to view it as a national prob-
lem and said, in effect: "Our prac-
tices are clean. We aren't over-
emphasizing. So we see no need to
change."
THIS WAS particularly true in
the case of the Ivy League, where
the sport was born in 1869, and
the Western Conference (Big Ten),
which long has professed its pur-
ity in the conduct of athletics.
Meanwhile, however, college
organizations, rocked by a series
of scandals, called for an "end
to undesirable trends in athlet-
ics," and a few institutions read-
ily obeyed.
William and Mary's faculty, de-
claring an ambitious sports pro-
gram was "obscuring and corrupt-
ing" the purposes of the university,
set up four committees to control
athletics and other facets of cam-
pus life. Under the new setup
sports took a secondary role.
W&M's DRASTIC action follow-
ed a sports scandal in which the
department of athletics was ac-
cused of tampering with the re-
cords of high school athletes to

make them eligible. Football coach
R. N. McCray and basketball coach
Barney Wilson resigned. Dr. John
E. Pomfret, president, later follow-
ed suit.
There have been numerous
other moves toward deemphasis,
but no general trend in that di-
rection.
Commissioners of the country's
ten major athletic conferences,
meeting in Colorado Springs this
past summer, urged curtailment of
sports schedules and preservation
of institutional control of athletics.
THE EXECUTIVE Council of theĀ¢
National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation, the colleges' parent body,
came out for a 12-point reform
program patterned largely after
the ill-fated "Sanity Code," which
was killed in Dallas last winter.
Arch Ward, sports' editor of
the Chicago Tribune, said the
colleges should rotate their head
coaches from year to year. This
would keep any one from build-
ing up a powerful machine and
would discourage high-pressure
recruiting.1
Notre Dame immediately en-
dorsed this plan although Lloyd
Jordan of Harvard, president of
The All-Campus tennis tour-
nament scheduled to begin to-
morrow has been postponed to I
allow more entries. Sign up t
at the I-M Building now.k
-_Dave Edwards ;
the American Football Coaches As-
sociation, said, "This is a problem
we need to attack from the inside
out, not from the inside in."
* * *
MOST OF THE other coaches
termed the Ward Plan unworkable.
It called for standardized salaries1
among top coaches, bonuses for
outstanding performances and ro-
tation of coaching talent within1
geographical areas.
These many moves aimed atz
cleaning up football came in the1
wake of one of the most turbulent
years in the history of campus ath-
letics. Here are a few of the things
that happened:

1. A series of basketball scan-
dals broke and kept popping like
delayed-action firecrackers, en-
veloping the top teams and top
players in the United States.
2. West Point's mighty foot-
ball team was wiped out by an
"exam-cribbing" scandal which
Congressmen termed the result
of too much emphasis on the
game.
3. Thirty-one small colleges
had to quit football altogether.
They couldn't keep pace in the
era of two-platoons and televis-
ion.
4. Half a hundred head foot-
ball coaches left their jobs at the
end of the last season, many of
them as the result of "win-or-
lose" alumni pressure. Such fix-
tures as Bernie Bierman of Min-
nesota, Blair Cherry of Texas
and Jeff Cravath of Southern
California went into other pro-
fessions.
The president of Purdue Univer-
sity, Frederick L. Hovde, a former
Minnesota quarterback, suggests
long term contracts and faculty
status for coaches. His own. Stu
Holcomb, has just been given a
ten-year extension of his working
agreement.
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Wilbur
Johns of UCLA, a member of the
NCAA council, feels there must be
reduced emphasis on college sports
but that it must be done on a na-
tional scale rather than by the in-
stitutions individually.
"We are agreeable to curbing
the free substitution rule and
modifying spring practice where
letternen are excluded," he said.
A different note was sounded by
Virgil M. Hancher, president of the
University of Iowa, who said Iowa
plans no changes.
"WE DO NOT think we have
had over-emphasis on the college
sport," Hancher said. "In fact,
many of our fans do not believe we
have emphasized football enough."
Other Big Ten schools expres-
sed a similar attitude. "We have
never permitted athletics to run
hog-wild," said Nathan Fein-
singer, former chairman of Wis-
consin's Athletic Board. "We feel
sports has its place among sam-
pus activities."
Most of the Ivy League also is
standing firm on its purity but, if
anything, emphasis there is creep-
ing in rather than out.

hero of his team's opening day
conquest, will get the call at
safety.
The series of games between the
schools stretches over 53 years and;
Michigan holds a big edge, having
won 33, lost seven and tied three.
PASSING is expected to be the
vital element in today's battle.
Dorow will be aiming at his f a-
vorite targeteCarey, as wellsasfa
variety of other capable receivers.
Willie Thrower is the second flight
passer.I
No one knows just what to
expect in the way of aerial dis-
play from Michigan. Just about
everyone in the backfield can
hurl the ball, but Putich and
Oldham are in key positions for
the task. Freshman quarterback
Duncan McDonald may get a
chance to launch a few before
the final gun sounds.
Both squads are at a high peakI
physically with the exception of

ALLIE REYNOLDS
... second no-hitter
Major
League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

NEW YORK - (P) - The Newj
York Yankees swamped the Bos-
ton Red Sox twice yesterday to
clinch their 18th American League
pennant in 30 years, but the feat
almost escaped notice as Allie
Reynolds, the fire-baller from Ok-
lahoma, spun his second no-hit
game of the season inthe opener.
jNever before in the American
League and only once before in the
history of the Major Leagues had
a hurler pitched no-hit games
twice in a single campaign. The
wild scene in the Bombers' dress-
ing room after the big Indian
whomped the Hose, 8 to 0, even
eclipsed the tumult of the "vic-
tory celebration" which followed
Vic Raschi's 11 to 3 triumph in
the decider.
THE TRIUMPHS boosted the
Yanks' lead to 312 games over
second-place Cleveland and elim-
inated the Indians from the race.
The Yanks have three games to
play and the Indians two. The
victories also clinched second place
for Cleveland.
A crowd of 39,038 which had
paid its way in to watch the
champions sew up their third
straight flag got double its mon.-
ey's worth as Reynolds, scoring
his 17th decision of the year,
permitted only four Red Sox to
reach first base on passes and
choked them off right there. He
gave the bemused Sox nothing
remotely resembling a safety.
The righthander's other no-
hitter this season was pitched
against his old teammates, the
Cleveland Indians, on July 12 at
Cleveland. The only other hurler
to notch a pair in the same cam-
paign was Johnny Vander Meer,
the storied lefthander who pitch-
ed two in succession for Cincinnati
back in 1938.
* * *
WHEN ASKED by reporters
about his remarkable feat, the big
Indian was nonchalant.
"I knew it all the time," Rey-
nolds said with a slow grin.
"How could I help it," he add-
ed. "The scoreboard was right
there."
Was he upset by the dropping of
Ted Williams' foul by Yogi Berra
in the ninth inning, a fumble
which prolonged the agony for
the breathless fans?

"NO," he said simply. "I was
just afraid I had steppld on Yogi's
hand. I asked him and he said I
didn't. I saw the wind blowing
the ball toward the field."
Someone asked Allie if the game
was any different from the no-
hitter he pitched at Cleveland.
Again Allie gave a slow grin, re-
plying: "They were just the same;
they didn't get any hits in either
of them."
PHILADELPHIA -U')- Willie
Jones lashed out a ninth inning
single to score speedy Richie Ash-
burn from second and give the
Pillies a 4 to 3 triumph over the
Brooklyn Dodgers last night in
the first game of their final three-
game series.
The defeat dropped Brooklyn
into a tie with the idle New York
Giants for the National League
lead with two games left for each
club.
ANDY SEMINICK'S home run
with one on base in the eighth
had tied the score for the Phillies
as Carl Erskine failed to hold a
three-run lead.
The Dodgers, playing cau-
tiously after losing a similar lead
in Boston Thursday, got all
their runs off Karl Drews in the
six innings he pitched.
Last night's defeat finally re-
duced Brooklyn's once-huge lead
to nothing. At one stage this sea-
son they had a 13% game margin,
only to see the onrushing Giants
catch up.
A chilled crowd of 18,895
cheered when Seminick came
through in the eighth with his
eleventh homer of the season
and his first in a month and a
half. Gran Hamner, who had
drawn the third walk off Ers-
kine, scored ahead of him and
made it a ball game.
* * *
ASHBURN opened the home half
of the ninth with a Texas-league
Single down the left field foul line.
Dick Sisler advanced him with a
sacrifice and Bill Nicholson was
given an intentional pass. Then
Jones, who had connected for a
rousing double his first time at
bat, slashed a single into left cen-
ter and Ashburn slid home well
in front of Andy Pafko's throw for
the winning run.

W L Pet.

New York
Cleveland
Boston
Chicago
Detroit
Philadelphia
Washington
St. Louis

95
92
87
80
72
68
61
51

56
60
64
72
80
83
90
101

.629
.605
.576
.526
.474
.450
.404
.336

GB
8
27
34
44 fa

Michigan's traditional battle
with Michigan State this aft-
ernoon will be carried over the
following stations in and

1
I
I
i
i
I
I

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 8-11, Boston 0-3
Chicago 6-4, St. Louis 2-3..
Philadelphia at Washington,
postponed.
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York (2)
Detroit at Cleveland
Chicago at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Washington (N)
T * E
NATIONAL LEAGUE

around A n n Arbor: WJR,
WWJ, Detroit; WPAG, WUOM,
Ann Arbor; WKMH, Dearborn.
Michigan State's senior - tackle, I
Jack Morgan, who broke his leg
in practice last Monday.
* * *
THE WOLVERINES' role of un-
derdogs is in direct contrast with
the situation they found them-
selves in a year ago. State's 14-7
upset victory broke the spell of
Michigan invincibility in that con-
test, and the Spartans will be es-
pecially anxious to make it two in
a row for the first time since the
1934-37 era when they swept four'
straight.
Punting in today's game will
more than likely be handled by
two specialists, Bill Billings of
Michigan and Tom Yewcic of the,
Spartans.
Bob Carey does State's placeI
kicking and Russ Rescorla handles
conversions for the Wolverines.

Brooklyn
New York
St. Louis
Boston
Philadelphia
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago

W L
94 58
94 58
79 72
76 76
73 79
67 85
63 89
61 90

Pct.
.618
.618
.523
.500
.480
.441
.414
.404

GB
14'/;
18
21
27
31
32%

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 4, Brooklyn 3.
Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 3.
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Boston,
Brooklyn at Philadelphia (N)
St. Louis at Chicago
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (N)

START THE YEAR

------ -------

I IF

14 1

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PLAYED IN THE
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