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September 29, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-29

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I

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMER 9, 1951

enton Charges McCarthy
Vith Perjury in Ouster Row (Mf

,.-_
1 -I

WASHINGTON - P) - Sena-
or William Benton (D-Conn.)
esterday challenged the fitness
f Senator McCarthy (R-Wis.) to
it in the Senate.
In a 25,000-word blast~Benton
ccused McCarthy of perjury,
raud and "deception of the
American people."
Testifying under oath before a

nate Cuts

Tax Request
Income, Excess
Levies Increased
WASHINGTON-(oP)--The Sen-
ate yesterday passed a bill to raise
personal and corporate income
taxes and excess levies by $5,450,-
000,000 a year-little more than
half of President Truman's re-
quest.
Passage was by a roll call vote,
57-k9.
The measure now goes back to
the House, which voted to in-
crease taxes by $7,200,000,000. A
conference to compromise the dif-
ferences is expected to begin by
the middle of next week.
The bill carries the third big
tax boost voted by Congress since
the start of the Korean war.
The final version is expected
to reach President Truman in
about two weeks. But it will
carry far less than the $10,000,-
000,000 of new revenue he said
was needed to balance the bud-
get and fight inflation,
inflation.
In a climatic vote earlier in the
day; the Senate rejected a plan
to increase personal income taxes
$2,500,000,000 by eliminating the
benefits of income splitting be-
tween2married couples. The vote
was 62 to 14.
Senator Humphrey (D-Minn.)
offered this proposal as a sub-
stitute for the Finance Commit-
tee's plan to get $2,394,000,000 in
new revenue through an 11 per
cent increase on most individuals,
(The house bill provides a 12 1/2
per cent boost in all personal in-
come taxes.)
This wasbthe last major amend-
ment to be introduced by a 15-
man bloc which attempted to
boost the increases nearer the
$10,000,000,000 t h a t President
Truman said was necessary to
balance the budget.
4 Earlier, the Senate defeated an-
other of the bloc's amendments.
It called for a 28 per cent rate on
the capital gains tax, instead of
25 per cent, provided by law now
and continued in the committee
tbill. The vote was 53 to 26
against theproposal. Senator
Douglas (D-Ill.), the sponsor, said
It would have added $90,000,000
annually.
Varsity Night
TryoutsCalled
If your specialty is anything
ranging from training pet seals to
reciting Shakespeare, you are eli-
gible to try out for the thirteenth
annual Varsity Night to be held
Oct. 26.
Sponsored by the University
Bands, Varsity Night combines the
best campus ability to be found
with two or three professional acts.
Emceed last year by radio-come-
dian Joe Gentile, the show was a
sell-out.
Auditions will be held from 2-
5:30 p.m. tomorrow at Harris Hall,
and at the same time next Sunday,
Oct. 7. Additional appointments
may be made by calling 31511, ex-
tension 2114.

Senate inquiry committee, Benton
tied most of his accusations-
based on 10 "case studies"-to
McCarthy's sensational Commun-
ists-in-government charges last
year.
McCARTHY WAS not present as
Benton called for his ouster or at
least a vote of censure.
The Wisconsin Senator left
Washington Thursday to fill a
speaking engagement in New
Mexico. McCarthy, who has re-
peatedly accused Benton of try-
ing to shield what he calls "the
crimson clique in the State De-
partment," told reporters at
Santa Fe:
"As I said before, I would not
take the time to answer Connecti-
cut's odd little mental midget who
is being used as a megaphone for
the Communist party line type of
smear."
* * *
ON CAPITOL Hill, less than a
dozen spectators were present at
the Senate hearing, which had
been billed originally as a closed
session, as Benton read through
his bulky 59-page statement. At
the last minute, Chairman Gil-
lette (D-Iowa) threw open the
doors to the public. Television,
radio and movie cameras were
barred.
Noting that 18 U. S. Senators
have been expelled in the past,
Benton told the committee its
task was to decide whether
McCarthy "has committed per-
jury and whether he has prac-
ticed calculated deceit on both
the U. S. Senate and the Amer-
ican people."
"If the committee decides that
Senator McCarthy has committed
perjury," Benton said, "I assume
it will bring the facts to the at-
tention of the proper authorities
for prosecution in the courts."
BENTON, A slight, sandy-haired
man, told the committee his own
personal conviction is that Mc-
Carthy should be expelled "as the
appropriate action."
But he said he had been told
that some Senators were "gun-
shy" about taking such a step,
and declared he had been in-
formed there have been three
cases in modern times "where a
vote of censure has been deemed
more suitable than outright ex-
pulsion."
McCarthy has served four and
one-half years of his six-year
term.
Wallgren Quits,
As FPCHead
WASHINGTON-(M)-The long-
expected resignation of Mon C.
Wallgren as Chairman of the Fed-
eral Power Commission was ac-
cepted "with genuine regret" to-
day by President Truman, hislong-
time friend.
It is effective Oct. 1.
In resubmitting his resignation,
first tendered last spring, the one-
time Washington state governor
said only that his desire to resign
was prompted by "personal and
private reasons."
Wallgren gave no inkling of his
future plans. There has been con-
jecture, however, that he might
seek election to the U.S. Senate or
as governor of his home state.
As an alternative, he also is re-
portedly interested in settling
down in California.
Read and Use

Daily Classifieds

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to oline.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LAWRENCE J. LOUGHLIN: Of State,
contact Leonard Greenbaum. Phone
2-3241 from10-12.
LOST-Watch, engraved on back "Bill"
and maroon and gold Parker "51"
pen. Reward. Ph. 2-3189. )4L
FOUND-Automatic pencil-please iden-
tify. Call Dexter 4831 evenings. )5L
LOST--Grey gaberdine jacket on cam-
pus. Call Stuart Orman, 2"-4410. )6L
FOR SALE
SUEDE LEATHER JACKET two tone
coat type. Purchased in Uruguay.
Never worn, size 36. 336 E. Madison
or Ph. 3-1803. )2
BABY PARAKEETS-$6 & $8 each. A
few cages. Mrs. Ruffin's, 562 S. 7th.

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
BACK TO NATURE-Thrown completely on their own resources
by a contractor's mistake in timing that left them without a stove,
Owen House women squat before their primitive cooking fire.
Jeanne Lussow and Marilyn Seeger are concocting a pot of soup
over the smoking logs. All available wood, including the lower
limbs of several nearby trees was used.
Loss of Stove rorces
*to , , rn t.-< R '. 'd L It-

rJtGA)IAA5lIA Gl0 , j
By PAULA EDELMAN
"More logs, more logs, don't let
the cook-fires die!"
For ten days cries for fuel,
mingled with the .smell of wood
smoke issued forth from 1017 Oak-
land.
BEHIND THIS pungent smell is
the story of thirty co-eds of Owen
House Co-op, who returned to
campus this fall and found them-
selves without the use of their
stove, refrigerator, or .sink, as all
kitchen attachments had been
disconnected in preparation for
laying new linoleum. But because
Senate Group
Asks Boyle
For Records
WASHINGTON-(/)-A Senate
inquiry group called yesterday for
the bank accounts of Democratic
National Chairman William M.
Boyle, Jr., and demanded full ac-
cess to his income tax returns for
1949 and 1950.
The surprise moves came after
Senators heard the testimony of
Theodore Link, a reporter for the
St. Louis Post-Dispatch, who re-
iterated the newspaper's charges
that Boyle received $8,000 in fees
from the American Lithofold
Corp. after the St. Louis printing
firm got $565,000 in RFC loans.
Link was supposed to be the fin-
al witness in the inquiry conducted
by the Senate's Investigations
Subcommittee._ But he furnished
the group with so many new leads
that it was decided to extend the
probe.
As the Lithofold investigationk
came to life again, the RFC fired
James O. Hoover, a Washington
loan examiner, and suspended Ed-
win R. Willard, a $9,200 a year
engineer in the Washington office,
on charges that they accepted tele-
vision sets from the National Un-
ion Radio Company of Orange,
N.J.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
44c to 5 P.M.
t

of a misunderstanding on dates
the job had not been done before
they arrived.
Disinclined to boost local res-
taurant profits as long as there
was a supply of food in the
house and more being delivered
daily by the Inter-Cooperative
Council, the women fared it out
with cold-stuffs for the first
few days.
"The sarcastic refrain, 'And how
will you have your peanut butter
sandwich prepared tonight' soon
grew unbearable though," e x -
plained Ann Aldrich, '54, "So we
called a meeting and decided we!
must have a hot meal."
* * *
"THE RESULT being that weI
lit the fireplace and cooked our!
meals 'mongst the ashen coals.
Hotdogs and popcorn were on the
ear'ly menus, but we soon gradu-
ated to macaroni and cheese," con-
tinued Jeanie Lussow, '54, as she
thumbed through a yellowing copy
of Favorite Indian recipes for
Hickory Smoked Hamburgers.
Eventually all the the kind-
ling wood, old furniture and low-
er limbs of surrounding trees
were used and the only alterna-
tive left was to cook at one of
the other co-ops.
"What a task that was!" inter-
jected Shelley Estin, '53, telling her
story, "I was the cook and we car-
ried two huge pots and the mak-
ings for chili ten blocks to Stevens
House, and we had to have a
truck to bring us and the chili
back. Itwas an open truck, so as
we turned each corner the chili
slopped out and we left an aroma-
tic trail which permeated through-
out the campus."
After 10 days of roughing it, the
promised new linoleum was finally
put in yesterday, and convention
reigns again at Owen House.
Continuous 1 :30 to 1 1 :30
-
-I

U. S. NAVY ARMY TYPE oxfords $6.88.
Sizes 6-12, A to F widths. Open till 6
p.m. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)3
STUDENT-FACULTY SALE
(2-semester rates)
Time........ ............$2.00
(Faculty $4.75 a year)
Life .... .................$3.00
Fortune ...................$5.00
Building........... (year) $5.50
Write to Student Periodical Agency,
330 Municipal Ct. Bldg., or phone
2-8242 (9-6). )7
OTHERS TRY TO IMITATE IT
But there's only one
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
See it! Buy it at
BURR-PATS, 1209 S. "U' )5
1937 CHEVROLET TUDOR SEDAN -
Heater, good tires and battery. Fine
transportation. $95.00. Phone 2-6092.
)10
FOR SALE-Family heirloom 1930 Model
"A" Ford. Good condition. Call 9233.
Honest Hugh McCoy. )12
SALE-100% wool jackets $4.99. Rayon
lined, zipper front. Tan only. Sur-coat
style. Open till 6:00 p.m. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington.)3

FOR SALE
WOMAN'S BICYCLE - Light weight
Schwinri. Call 2-6792. $25. )11
FOR RENT
DELIGHTFUL SUITE OF ROOMS with
1 or 2 bedrooms, kitchen privileges,
and private bath for 1. 2, or 3 men
or married couple. All modern facili-
ties. 10 minute drive from city limits.
Call 3CH7778. )2F
STUDENT WITH AC-Exchange handy-
man work in faculty home for large
quiet room, private bath and privi-
leges. Phone 2-3844 noon or evening.
)4R
FOUR-ROOM SUITE for 3-5 men. 1402
Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m. )1R
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
ATTRACTIVE large double room for
men. Has 3 large windows, twin beds
with innerspring mattresses; also 4-
room suite for 3 to 5 men. 1402 Hill
St. Call after 5:30 p.m. )1R
DOUBLE ROOM for men. Twin beds,
private bath, inside entkance, 3 blocks
from campus. Call 2-0519. )5R
ROOMS FOR RENT-Double room, also
a room to share. Linen furnished.
Gas heated continuous hot water.
? block from campus, 417 E. Liberty.
6R
FOR MEN-Attractive double in beau-
tiful home, private shower, also sin-
gle room, 1430 Cambridge., )8R
TWO SPACIOUS ROOMS-Newly decor-
ated and 1 large double for men.
520 ,Thompson, call 2-0542. )8R
GIRL-WORKER OR STUDENT-Room
with older girl. Home weekends only.
Near campus. Rent $5.50. 509 S.
Division. )9R
DOUBLE ROOMS FOR MEN-3 blocks
from campus, $22.50 per month. Call
J. Smithson, 2-3179. )11R
SUITE-Working man or student. Close
to campus, Union. $5.50 per week.
Shower, continuous hot water. 509
S. Division Street.
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED by Fraternity or
corner of S. University & Washtenaw.
Deliciuus meals for $2.00 per day.
Please phone 2-0549 and ask for Stew-
ard or House Manager. )1X
BOARD FOR WOMEN-3 meals daily.
826 Tappan. Call Mrs. Nelson, 8301.
)2X
PERSONAL
STUDENTS-Do you enjoy good food?
If you do, stop at 425 S. Division and
get the deal. Tells Dining Room. )5P
SPECIAL-Thursday, Friday, Saturday
only-Large mumns with ribbon 89c
each. Supply limited, place orders
now. Varsity Flower Shop, 1122 S.
University. > 3
WANT TO BE POPULAR? Anxious to
have people dropping in to see you?
Dale Carnegie to the contrary, we
suggest you subscribe to Life for $3
a school year. Then watch the visi-
tors come. Phone 2-8242, Student
Periodical Agency. ) 4P

TRANSPORTATION T HELP WANTED
FROM DEARBORN to school. Call YOUNG MAN to work part
Logan 3-6670. )1T Allenel Hotel. See Mr. Dame

S131C11G1 13U UGls -IV -1. ld"lAx9i

STARTS TOMORROW
2 -"REVEALING FEATURES -2
"One of 50 High-school children
uses DOPE !"
WOPI DJEt EGRAM'
E -- w
li~ eH 'Csj TO
,n"

HELP WANTED
BABY SITTERS NEEDED - Girls and
women, age 20-60. Experience. Call
Kiddie Kare, Ph. 3-1121. )3H
WOMAN STUDENT or student's wife-
Housework, 2-4 hrs. daily. Near cam-
pus. Ph. 3-8454. )5H
CARRIERS WANTED for Michigan
Daily-Good pay and short hours.
Ph. 2-3241, ask for Desk or Circula-
tion Dept. )6H
ELECTROLUX CORP. has openings
available for salesmen. If interested
write Charles F. Shade, 307 Brier-
wood. )7H
Read Daily Classifieds

BUSINESS SERVICES
KIDDIE KARE
RELIABLE SITTERS available. Phone
3-1121. )2B
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. M >rrill's,
314 S. State St. )3B
WASHING - Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Will do ironing also. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )5B
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Service
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Guaranteed
repair service on all makes of type-
writers. )4B

ttimne --
e. )2x

7

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i

-p -nd
l The 3on-a. and r ,
honeymoon°
the year!
COLUM
wth GIG YOUNG " MARIE McDONALD " HARRY DAVENPORT.* FAY BAKER * KATHARINE WARREt
Screen Play by Not Perrin * Directed by NORMAN FOSTER * Produced by BUDDY ADLR
-Last Time Today -..
PASSAGE WEST (in color)
A T Ha n d
SEVEN DAYS TO NOON
LATE SHOW at 10:30

READ and USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

k'

TODAY a LATE SHOW TONIGHT
A A- 4-1 C KAome as late as 11 P.M.

JOHN DEREK and DONNA REED

t

ao PEI a g PE nDOQ ] o

:1

i

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MAT.'TI1L 5 30c
NIGHTS & SUN. 44c,
Children Under 12-14c
-- Ends Tonight-
ALAN LADD
"APPOI NTMENT
WITH DANGER"
- Plus -
TYRONE POWER
"RAWHIDE"
- STARTSSUNDAY -
b is funnier
than ever in this
new Damon Rungon
laugh riot!

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