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September 27, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Y _ .

PAGE

'M' Passes Potent
In Practice Drills

Yankees

Lose;

odgers,

iants

WI"

The Wolverine may have a
rather potent passing attack of
their own with which to greet
Michigan State Saturday after-
noon.
After working on the aerial
phase of the game for a major
portion of yesterday afternoon's
practice session at Ferry Field the
Michigan gridders appeared to
have enough strength in the pass-
ing department to give the Spar-
tans trouble and counteract the
passing of Michigan State's Al
Dorow.
THE QUARTERBACKS, , ill
Putich, Don Zanfagna, Ted Topor,
and Duncan McDonald were used
considerably in the passing role.
All were hitting their receivers
well toward the end of the session.
Topor, who was declared eli-
gible for the 1951 season by the
eligibility board only Tuesday
night, was shifted into the quar-
terback slot with the third
string backfield during yester-

Tom Witherspoon and Don Peter-
son.
COACH BENNIE Oosterbaan
was sticking with the same back-
field combinations which he has
recently employed with Putich at
quarter, Howell and Oldham at
the halves, and Witherspoon at
full in .the first quartet.
The second backfield team
again included Zanfagna at the
blocking back, Bradford at
wingback, Eaddy at tailback,
and Peterson at fullback.
The spirit of the team seemed
to be rising to a new peak in an-
ticipation of the battle with the
Spartans. This was very evident
in the defensive drill which pre-
ceeded the offensive session.
* '* *
THE WOLVERINES defensive
units worked principally on pass
defense, with the reserves using
* * *

A's Trip Up
Yanks, 4-1;
Bosox .Bow
NEW YORK-( P)-Little Bobby
Shantz sliced the New York Yan-
kees' American League lead to 2 /2
games over the Cleveland Indians
with a six-hit 4-1 victory yesterday
for the Philadelphia A's on home
runs by Ferris Fain, Gus Zernial
and Dave Philley.
Thus the Yanks, idle until Fri-
day's double header with Boston,
still need a combination of two
wins or two Cleveland defeats to
clinch their third straight pennant.
New York has five to play and
Cleveland only two.
* * * .
IN OTHER American Leagues
games last night, Washington
downed Boston 7-3, to crush Red
Sox pennant hopes, and last-place
St. Louis ended a four-game De-
troit Tiger winning streak, 7-1, be-
hind Ned Garver.
Shantz, a 5-foot-7, lefty,
joined Mel Parnell and Virgil
Trucks as four-time winners
over the Yankees as a special
26th birthday present to himself.
Needing only a win over the A's
to assure themselves of at least a
tie, the Yanks were completely vic-
timized by the talented little fel-
low from Pottstown, Pa. All six
of their hits were singles while the
Philadelphia "spoilers" turned on
the extra-base power for three
homers, a triple and three doubles
in their 10-hit attack on loser Bob
Kuzava and Johnny Sain.
Zernial's 33rd homer, following
Elmer Valo's triple in the third,
was a terrific blast that carried in-
to the left field bleachers some 430
feet away. Only Joe Dimaggio and
Hank Greenberg hit balls into
those seats in the memory of the
oldest Yankee Stadium greybeard.

PLAYS HERE SATURDAY:
MSC's Carey boasts
tireat Sports Record

ti

day's workout.
Topor, who weighs 215 pounds,
is expected to be used primarily
on defense as a linebacker, but
The University Golf Course
will be closed on the days of
all home football games.
Golf Course Management

By NEIL BERNSTEIN
The greatest all-around athlete
in Michigan State history will lead
the Spartans onto the gridiron
Saturday in quest of their second
straight win over Michigan and
their eighth straight football vic-
tory.
Bob Carey, 6 foot 5, 215 pound
senior from Charlevoix, should
graduate from Lansing a nine-
letter man, winning three letters
each in football, basketball, and
track, besides holding or sharing
six Spartan records in football (for
pass receiving and field goal kick-
ing) and the school shotput record.
CAREY PLAYS left end and
captains the football team, is first
string center-forward of the bas-
ketball squad, and throws the shot
and the discus for the thinclads.
As a sophomore two years
ago, he caught 26 passes for 523
yards and eight touchdowns.
That was the second best mark
ever achieved by an end in the
Middle West, topped only by the
526 yards rolled up by Don Vos-
berg of Marquette in the 1930s.
Last season, although handi-
capped most of the time with a
badly damaged knee, Carey got in
every game, caught 19 passes for
268 yards and three touchdowns
and was Michigan State's extra
point specialist.
* * *
IN THIS CAPACITY he booted
27 out of 35 and cashed two field
goals as well. One of the latter
represented the vital difference in
the 36-33 thriller won by Michi-
gan State over Notre Dame.
His total of 51 points for the

year was surpassed on the Spar-
tan squad only by Sonny Gran-
delius' 72.
He garnered numerous honors
last year, including a citation as
"College Player of the Week" by
Football Digest for his play in the
Oregon State game.
S * *
HE WAS ELECTED to Collier's
All Mid-West team, second squad
for United Press and honorable
* * *

iles Weihs
Offer To Run
National Loop
Reds' Executive
Soughtby Owners
CHICAGO-(/)-Warren Giles,
who graciously stepped out of a
stalemate with Ford Frick for
baseball's commissionership, yes-
terday was graciously asked to be-
come Frick's successor as president
of the National League.
League vice-president Phil Wrig-
ley of the Chicago Cubs yesterday
disclosed that the loop presidents
wanted Giles, 55, dignified no. 2
man of the Cincinnati Reds, to ac-
cept Frick's $40,000-a-year-job at
a meeting alreadyset after the
final world series game.
,* * *
"MR. GILES is giving the matter
serious consideration," said Wrig-
ley in a statement, "and naturally
we are all most anxious for him to
accept, as everyone must recog-
nize that he is undoubtedly, from
every angle, the best qualified man
that we could get."
Naturally, he would be, be-
cause the owners kept giving
Giles the same number of votes
as Frick in the Sept. 20 balloting
to name a man to baseball's top
job, the $65,000-a-year commis-
sionership. That was until Giles
withdrew from the 11-hour
deadlock and threw his full sup-
port behind Frick, who was not
present at the Chicago meeting
to select A. B. Chandler's suc-
cessor.:
There may be mode honor con-
nected with running the National
League, but some observers believe
financially, Giles would be just as
well off to remain as president of
the Reds, owned by Powel Crosley,
Jr.

t By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA-The amazing
New York Giants kept their pen-
nant hopes simmering last night
with a crushing 10 to 1 triumphi
over the Philadelphia Phillies,
pulling up once more to within a
single game of the leading Brook-
lyn Dodgers as Larry Jansen
racked up his 21st victory of the
National League campaign.
Knowing they had to win or
face virtual elimination after
Brooklyn's defeat of Boston in the
afternoon. Leo Durocher's battlers
lowered the boom on last year's
league champions with a four-
run onslaught before a man was,
retired in the first inning and
went on to batter six assorted
Phil pitchers for their 35th vic-
tory in their last 42 games.
The Giants now head for New
York for a two-day rest before
taking their final shot at the flag
over the week-end.
It is impossible for the Dodgers
to clinch the pennant now before
Saturday-next to the last day of
the race-even should they win
today's series finale at Boston
and the opener of their final
three-game set with the Phils
here on Friday. Two, such wins
would, however, assure 'them a
tie.
Brooklyn's harrassed but un-
bowed Dodgers got up off the
floor yesterday afternoon to
slug out a 15-5 "must" victory
over the tormenting Boston
Braves in what might have been
the crusher to the Giants' pen-
nant chances.
Belted from pillar to post in
Tuesday night's pair of shocking
setbacks at, the hands of the
Braves, the Dodgers retaliated
with a merciless 14-hit "massa-
cre" of ,their own at the expense
of six harried and helpless Boston
hurlers.

League-leading Dodgers' margin
over the onrushing Giants to -
full game.
Don Neweombe, in his fourth
try for his 19th victory, finally
made it with an eight-hitter.
The strong-armed righthander
was staked to a 4-0 lead in the
first inning and coasted along
despite giving up home run
balls to Bob Addis and Earl
Torgeson in the eighth.
The Dodgers bunched all thei
runs into three innings-but wha
innings they were. Following
their riotous four-run first, they
really lowered the boom on start.
er Matt Surkont with anothe
four-run outburst in the fifth
They added seven more tallies in
the eighth for good measure.
* * *
Pennant Raes
At a Glance
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB GI
Brooklyn 94 56 .627 -
New York 94 58 .618 1, 2
Remaing games:
Brooklyn at home (0) ; away
(4) Boston, Sept. 27; Philadel-
phia, Sept. 28, 29, 30.
New York at home (0); away
(2) Boston, Sept. 29, 30.
* * *

NY Trounces Phils 10.
To Stay In LeagueRa

will give the
blocker in an
backfield.

offense a strong
otherwise small

* * *
McDONALD, ALL-STATE in
high school, .is particularly effec-
tive on T-formation plays. The
freshman was very sharp on his
short passes and on a number of
his longer heaves in yesterday's
session.
Halfbacks Don Oldham and
Don Eaddy, freshman tailback
from Grand Rapids, who worked
with the second backfield com
bination, also threw a number
of passes during the practice.
Toward the completion of yes-
terday's practice Oldham was hit-
ting his receivers much better
than he had been in the past few
days. Eaddy's passing has been.
very satisfactory, and can be ex-
pected to be an important dog in
the Wolverine aerial attack.
** *
LOWELL PERRY and Fred
Pickard, first string ends, were
on the receiving end of the Wol-
verine passes. Pickard looked
very impressive as he snagged pass
after pass.
Frank Howell and Wes Brad.
ford, the first and second wing-
backs, respectively, were sent
downfield to grab several long
passes which clicked.
A few running plays were mixed
in with the passing attack during
the offensive drill. Howell and
Bradford did most of the ball
7 carrying, along with fullbacks

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.GB
New York 93 56 .624 ---
Cleveland 92 60 .605 212
Boston 87 61 .588 5,4

GL
5
2
6

FRED PICKARD
. . . shines in pass drill
* * *
Spartan pass plays. The white-
shirted reserves, however, did not
meet with much success in either
their running or passing attempts,
being stopped by the high-spirit-
ed varsity.
A short tackling drill and wind
sprinting completed the three-
hour practice session yesterday.
Coach Oosterbaan expected to
taper off the practice sessions
this afternoon and tomorrow.
Red Wings Sell
Goalie Henry
DETROIT --(A')-- The Detroit
Red Wings yesterday sold goalie
Jim Henry to the Boston Bruins of
the National Hockey League. They
declined to name the amount in-
volved in the straight cash deal.
Henry was acquired by the Red
Wings last August in a trade with
the Chicago Black Hawks, but was
sent to the Deroit farm club at
Indianapolis, where he spent the
season.
Henry started his pro hockey
career with the New York Rang-
ers before the outbreak of World
War II.
The Red Wings broke training
camp at Sault St. Marie last week-
end, and the NHL champs make
their first appearance in the Motor
City this Sunday against their In-
dianapolis farm with a practice tilt
slated for Olympia Stadium.

Remaining games:
New York-at home (5) Bos-
ton, Sept. 28, (2), 29 (2), 30.
Away (0).
Cleveland-at home (2) De-
troit, Sept. 29, 30. Away ().
Boston--at home (0). Away
(6) Washington, Sept. 27. New.
York, Sept. 28 (2); 29 (2), 30.

LATE SPORTS FLASHES:
Sandy Saddler Retains Title
WithTKO Over Pep in Ninth

"KEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR"
Collegiate styles a specialty
9 Barbers - No Waiting
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-With Willie Pep
huddling- in his corner protesting
to referee Ray Miller he couldn't
go on, Sandy Saddler successfully
defended his world featherweight
title last night with a nine-round
technical knockout in a bout
marred by rough house wrestling
tactics.
Warned repeatedly by Miller
for his leg holds and body twists
in this grudge battle at the Polo
Grounds, Pep gave up the strug-
gle.
A savage left hook dumped
P p on his haunehes for an
eight count in the second round
of this wrestling match. That
was the only clean-cut knock-
down of the evening although
both were on the deck several
times in bunny hugs.
Miller said he went to Pep's
corner at the end of the ninth to
tell him "cut out the wrestling
and holding or I'll call this no
contest."
** *
LONDON-A British relay team
set a world record of seven
minutes, 30.6 seconds last night
for two miles during the London
Gothenburg track and field meet
at White City Stadium.
The team of Bill Nankeville,
Art Webster, Frank Price and
John Parlett defeated a crack
Swedish quartet to shatter the

mark of 7:34.6 set by the Univer-
sity of California in 1941.
* * *
WEST POINT - Coach Earl
Blaik says he hasn't had any sur-
prises since he started to x-3build
the Army football team out of the
scanty remnants left when nearly
40 players were dropped from the
Military Academy for cribbing.
With that statement goes the
intimation that he'll be very
pleasantly surprised if Army
wins its opening game from
rugged Villanova Saturday.
The result leads to this apprais-
al of the 1951 Army squad.
A group of very promising
Sophomore backs and a much
smaller number of good line pros-
pects have performed in practice
just about the way promising
sophs are expected to do. The old-
er players, rescued from the "B"
squad, already had come close to
the limits of their potential ability
without making the varsity in
past seasons.
* * *
WOOSTER, 0- A 35-year-old
father of three children is out for
football at Wooster College where
he is a freshman.
He's Mel Riebe, former pro
baseball and basketball player who
was graduated from Euclid Shore
high school in Cleveland 17 years
ago.

BOB CAREY
. . .all-around Spartan
** *
mention for Associated Press,
among others.
Hid mark of 53 feet 2-y inches
ini the shotput is a Spartan rec-
ord, and Carey also is Big Ten
titleholder and placed third in
the NCAA championships last
spring.
His twin brother Bill also plays
on the Spartan football and bas-
ketball squads. There is a very
strong possibility that Bob will get
the left end offensive position, and
brother Bill, the right end spot,
a*_

T H E TRIUMPH

I I

kept thel

I

'henll the sun
of comparison goes
down . . . there
you'll be in your
KUOlN'S 'Topcoait.
You are entitled to the
finest Topcoat your mon-
ey will buy you.
We want to sell you a

I1

I

YV

i

Major League

Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

1

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.
New York 93 56 .624
Cleveland 92 60 .605
Boston 87 61 .588
Chicago 78 72 .520
Detroit 72 79 .477
Philadelphia 68 83 .450
Washington 60 90 .400
St. Louis 50 99 .336
* * *
TODAY'S GAMES

GB.
21/
51/
151/2
22
26
331/2
43

W
Brooklyn 94
New York 94
St. Louis 79
Boston 75
Philadelphia 72
Cincinnati 66
Pittsburgh 63
Chicago 61
* *

L
56
58
72
76
79
85
88
,90
*

Pet.
.627
.618
.523
.497
.477
.437
.417
.44

GB,
1
1512
19
221/
281/
31%,
33%

TOPCOAT . ,.

(what

'4

clothier doesn't) , , . but
we're basing our claim to
those dollars of yours on
the fact that comparison
will prove we've earned
them.
Compore these coats.. ,

Detroit at St. Louis-Stuart
(4-6) vs. McDonald (4-7)
Boston at Washington-Mas-
terson (3-0) vs. Moreno (4-11)
(Only games scheduled)

TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Boston-Roe (22-
4) vs. Nichols (10-8)
(Only game scheduled)

MORRILL'S I

that's all we ask,
that's all they need.

for

I

TY

The Typewriter and Stationery Store
'PEWRITERS STUDENT
SUPPLIES
Repaired 3 Ring Notebooks
Sold Fountair Pens
Rented Brief Cases
Bought Stationery

$9 50up

I

SI

I I

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