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September 27, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-27

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER ?1. I51

_

XPERIMENTAL NOW:
Permanent ID Cards
To Save Time, Money

In a move to save time and 1
money at registration, the Univer-1
sity this semester inaugurated a
system of laminating identifica-
Michigan Band,
To Present
Novel Theme
Southern mountain music will
be the theme of the Michigan
Marching Band's first appearance
this season at the half-time of
the Michigan - Michigan State
game here Saturday.
Among the formations planned
are a violin and moving bow for
the "Tennessee Waltz," a falling
pine tree for "Cut Down the Old
Pine Tree" and a horse and buggy
for "Wagon Wheels." In addition
to these a surprise ending is
promised, according to WilliamnD.
Revelli, director of the band.
* * *
A NEW PRECISION marching
maneuver will be-included in the
pre-game entrance on the field,
and between the halves band
members will parade on the field
to the tune of "Truly Fair."
The band this year includes
81 new members, bringing the
total to 152. For the past ten
days the band has been drilling
intensively to accustom the new
members to the precision drill
which has come to be the trade-
mark of the Michigan Band.
Revelli fears, however, that the
band may need a few Saturdays
practices before it reaches past
standards.
MICHIGAN STATE plans a
parody on the marching styles of
some European and American
bands. The Spartan bandsmen,
under the direction of Leonard V.
Falcone, will play the Star Span-
gled Banner as a part of their
pre-game show.
U' Plays Host
To Chemists
The University will be host to-
day and tomorrow to a group of
50 chemists and chemical engi-
neers from 20 countries.
t Part of a group of 300 chemists'
from overseas who recently at-
tended meetings at the Interna-
tional Chemical Conclave in New
York and are now touring the
United States, they will be con-
ducted on tours of University la-
boratories and a short general
tour of the campus.
The Michigan Section of the
American Chemical Society has
arranged both day's program.
Leigh C. Anderson, chairman of
the chemistry department; Donald
Katz, chairman of the Depart-
ment of Chemical Engineering;
and Howard B. Lewis, chairman
of the Department of 'Biological
Chemistry will welcome the group
and describe University facilities.
The tours, including visits to
industrial plants and universities
throughout the United States, are
sponsored by the Economic Co-
operation Administration and the
Ford Foundation.
Society Schedules
Operetta Tryouts
The Gilbert and Sullivan So-
ciety announced that tryouts will
be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. today
and Friday at the League for teir
forthcoming production "Ruddi-
gore."
Eight principal parts, 24 men's

and 17 women's chorus parts are
still open. Students interested in
working on the production staff
or in the orchestra are asked to
attend a meeting at 7 p.m., on
Sunday, in the League.

tion cards between two sheets of
plastic.
The new cards are being tried
experimentally and so far have
been issued only to freshmenhand
transfer students.
If they work satisfactorily, stu-
dents will be issued one card for
their entire four years at Michi-
gan, according to Erich A. Walter,
Dean of Students.
* * *
INSTEAD OF getting a new
card every year, a student will
have his permanent card punched
at registration to validate it for
the semester.
Student reaction to the new
cards varied. All were in favor
of the time the permanent cards
would save at registration but
disadvantages of the system
were also pointed out.
"You can age a lot in four years
at Michigan," one coed said. "In
your senior year you might not
look anything like the picture that
was taken in your freshman year.
Imagine trying to buy beer with
freshman ID!"
* * *
A FRESHMAN pointed out that,
if hair styles changed, it might
be hard to recognize a coed by
her picture.
Although the Office of Student
Affairs believes that the problem
of fading identification pictures
has been solved this year, they
urge any student whose picture
has faded to get in touch with
Mrs. Rosemary Waring at the Of-
fice of Student Affairs.
More Basic'
Scientific
StudyUrged
Scientists have failed to make
clear to the people of the United
States that basic research is an
essential part of scientific prog-
ress, according to Alan T. Wa-
terman, director of the National
Science Foundation.
Waterman urged basic research
and scholarship as a part of our
national culture here yesterday
before 200 engineers and scientists
representing government, business
and education at the concluding
session of the Fifth Annual Con-
ference on the Administration of
Research.
Dean Ralph A. Sawyer, of the
graduate school, warned against
continuing advisory boards and
panels "which do not serve a use-
ful function" in the United States
defense organization.
He conceded, however, that ad-
visory boards provide a mean for
a large number of scientists to
take part in the defense effort.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING.
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST in vicinity of Palmer Field tennis
courts-sterling silver "M" ring, en-
graved "National Collegiate Champ of
'51" initialed E.D.K. Phone 2-6336.
Reward. )3L
FOR SALE
THOROUGHBRED BOXER, Phone 9712.
)6
SUEDE LEATHER JACKET two tone
coat type. Purchased in Uruguay.
Never worn, size 36. 336 E. Madison
or Ph. 3-1803. )2
WHITE FORMAL-Size 10-11; jodphurs,
size 24-26. 2060 Stockwell. )1
BABY PARAKEETS-$6 & $8 each. A
few cages. Mrs. Ruffin's, 562 S. 7th.
)4
U. S. NAVY ARMY TYPE oxfords $6.88.
izes 6-12, A to F widths. Open till 61
p.m. Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
Attention Gals! 100% wool sweat sox,
49c pr. 6 pr. $2.80. )3

CAMPi
dayc
518 F

ROOMS FOR RENT TRANSPORTATION BUSINESS SERVICES
US TOURIT HOME-Rooms by COMMUTERS WANTED - Driving to KIDDIE KA R E
or week. Bath, shower, television. -4n n Drb rd il C)2T
"illi -> O- 1 5-4032, inDetroit. )2T RELIABLE SITTERS available.P

Phone

s. W1111am bt. Ynone 3-13454. )zrc I

ATTRACTIVE large double room for
men. Has 3 large windows, twin beds
With innerspring mattresses; also 4-
room suite for 3 to 5 men. 1402 Hill
St. Call after 5:30 p.m. )1R
WANTED-Man to work for room. Call
at 1223 Hill St. after 4:30. Mrs. Flor-
ence Blade. ) 3R
DOUBLE ROOM for men. Twin beds,
private bath, inside entrance, 3 blocks
from campus. Call 2-0519. )5R
COMFORTABLE double room for men.
One block from campus. 806 Hill, or
phone 8612 for appointment. )7R
ROOMS FOR RENT-Double room, also
a room to share. Linen furnished.
Gas heated continuous hot water.
% block from campus, 417 E. Liberty.
) 6R
FOR MEN-Attractive double in beau-
tiful home, private shower, also sin-
gle room, 1430 Cambridge. )8R
TWO SPACIOUS ROOMS-Newly decor-
ated and 1 large double for men.
520 Thompson, call 2-0542. )8R

RIDE - Saline to University arriving
eight, leaving five.USalines382-J. )3T
HELP WANTED
YOUNG MAN to work part-time -
Allenel Hotel. See Mr. Dames. )2H
PART TIME MEN WANTED-No sales
experience required although this is
a sales position with a local firm. Age,
not important. Character referencese
required. Phone 3-0548 for appoint-
ments. . )1H
BABY SITTERS NEEDED - Girls and
women, age 20-60. Experience. Call
KiddieKare, Ph. 3-1121. )3H
WOMAN STUDENT or student's wife-
Housework, 2-4 hrs. daily. Near cam-
pus. Ph. 3-8454. )5H
CARRIERS WANTED for Michigan
Daily-Good pay and short hours.
Ph. 2-3241, ask for Desk or Circula-
tion Dept. )6H
ELECTROLUX CORP. has openings
available for salesmen. If interested
write Charles F. Shade, 307 Brier-
wood. )7H
WANTED--Boy to work for room, one
hour daily. 7379. )9H

TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. Morrill's.
314 S. State St. )3B
WASHING - Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Will do ironing also. Free pick-
up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )5B
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Service
Company, 215 E. Liberty. Guaranteed
repair service on all makes of type-
writers. )4B
EXPERIENCED TUTOR from Germany
available to teach German. Call 3-1102.
)1B
WANTED TO RENT
GARAGE-South or east of campus.
Call John Lauer, 304 Prescott, 2-4591.
MISCELLANEOUS
LICENSED HOME for boarding children
ages 4-7. 5 days. Full time. Good
school nearby. Ph. 2-58131. )1M
ARE YOU SERIOUS about your educa-
tion? Read I WANT on page 8. )2M

ORGAN CONNOISSEUR-E. J. Quinby, electronics expert and
organ fanatic, realized a longtime ambition yesterday when he
sat down at the organ console in Hill Auditorium and played the
songs he once performed on a showboat calliope. Quinby consid-
ers the Hill instrument the finest auditorium organ in the world.
I
Shobitioat Veteran Realizes
Ambition To Play Hill Organ

-4.

t

ROOM AND BOARD

BOARDERS WANTED by Fraternity or
corner of S. University & Washtenaw.
Delicious meals for $2.00 per day.
Please phone 2-0549 and ask for Stew-
ard or House Manager. )1X
BOARD FOR WOMEN-3 meals daily.
826 Tappan. Call Mrs. Nelson, 8301.
) 2X

Tin Pan Alley never had it so
good.
Amidst the lush surroundings
of Hill Auditorium a tall, musta-
chioed organ connoisseur s a t
down at the famed University
console yesterday and played the
hit songs of yesteryear.
ALTHOUGH THE auditorium
seats were empty, it was a big
moment for showboat veteran E.
J. Quinby and some sort of a
milestone for the Hill organ, a
favorite of many visiting and resi-
dential classical artists.
Quinby, research director for
a calculating machine firm, rea-
lized a longtime ambition when
he got a crack at what he con-
siders "the finest auditorium
organ in the world."
"In practically every city I have
visited on my business tours
around the country, I have al-
ways made it a practice to look
up the leading organs in town,"
he says. The Administration of
Research Conference at the Uni-
versity this week gave him a
chance to play the huge E. M.
Skinner instrum.ent which is gen-
erally conceded to rank with the
world's best.
QUINBY'S INTEREST in the
organ began at the age of seven
when "I would sneak into St.
John's Cathedral in New York at
night and give vent to my dreams
of glory."
Although he never had for-
mal music training, his noctur-

nal practicing eventually got
him a job playing the calliope
on an Ohio River showboat.
After the outfit was threatened
with gambling charges, Quinby
went back to his practical love,
engineering. His musical hobby
was revived when he landed a job
in Camden, N. J. doing recording
work.
"WE USED a church in those
days because of the fine acous-
tics," he recalls. "Often I was
stopped on the street by passers-
by who had heard the blaring mu-
sic of Paul Whiteman's band from
the church and wanted to join the
new sect."
Serving in the fiavy" during
the war, Quinby" was stationed
at Key West, Fla., where he and
his wife Margaret turned an an-
cient gambling casino into a
combination home and studio
for their newly purchased or-
gan.
IN 1949, the Quinbys moved in-
to Carnegie H all stulios lock,
stock and organ.
"Our neighbors have always
thought us a bit strange be-
cause of the sacrifices we have
made for our organ," Quinby
says. "But anyone acquainted
with the instrument can readily
seerhow it could become a large
Ipart of one's life."
The organ is the ultimate cf
musical instruments, according to
Quinby. "As a matter of fact, it
is a collection of instruments at
the control of one person which
gives the greatest latitude of mu-
sical expression."

ROOMMATES-For the price of a post-
age stamp (3c) each you can have
Time mailed to you every week. Sub-
scribe now by phoning 2-8242, Stu
dent Periodical Agency._-
STUDENT-FACULTY SALE
(2-semester rates)
Time....................$2.00
(Faculty $4.75 a year)
Life --.....................$300
Fortune....................$5.00
Building........... (year) $5.50
Write to Student Periodical Agency,
330 Municipal Ct. Bldg., or phone
2-8242 (9-6). )7
CHRYSLER-Vintage of 1937, in fine
running condition. Ph. 2-9793 morn-
ings. )8
OTHERS TRY TO IMITATE IT
But there's only one
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
See it! Buy it at
BURR-PATS, 1209 S. "U' )5
1937 CHEVROLETsTUDOR SEDAN -
Heater, good tires and battery. Fine
transportation. $95.00. Phone 2-6092.
)10
FOR RENT
MODERN 2-bedroom house, unfurn-
ished, redecorated, oil heat, and gar-
age. Adults only. $125 per month.
Call 2-2644 after 5 p.m. )1F
DELIGHTFUL SUITE OF ROOMS with
1, or 2 bedrooms, kitchen privileges,
and private bath for 1. 2, or 3 men
or married couple. All modern facili-
ties. 10 minute drive from city limits.
Call 3CH7778. ) 2F
STUDENT WITH AC-Exchange handy-
man work in faculty home for large
quiet room, private bath and privi-
leges. Phone 2-3844 noon or evening.
)4R
FOUR-ROOM SUITE for 3-5 men. 1402
Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m. )1R
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

PERSONAL

MEN to eat at Fraternity House. Break-
fast, lunch or dinner or any combin-
ation. 1319 Cambridge. Phone 2-8312.
)1P
STUDENTS-Do you enjoy good food?
If you do, stop at 425 S. Division and
get the deal. Tells Dining Room. )5P
Don't miss reading I WANT on Page 8.
)4P
SPECIAL-Thursday. Friday, Saturday
only-Large mums with ribbon 89c
each. Supply limited, place orders
now. Varsity Flower Shop, 1122 S.
University. )3P
TRANSPORTATION
FROM DEARBORN to school. Call
Logan 3-6670. )1T

v' V1I~en*in ouC
Remember
to Enjoy
O PAUL THOMPKINS
playing your requests
-. on the Organ
Ii ~. . at . ..
WEBER'S SUPPER CLUB
3715 Jackson Road
I PLAYING THRU SATURDAY

},

44c to 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.

ITh1tEhi

STARTS TODAY

Reduced Train Fares Offered
To Illinois and Cornell Games

0

TWO INCIDENTS made his
maiden performance at Hill Audi-
torium yesterday a memorable
one for E. J. Quinby.

""""

The Wolverine Club will sponsor
train trips at reduced rates for
students to two away football
games, this year, according to Ed
Gibbon, '52, president.
Round-trip train tickets and liv-
New Fellowships
Open to Students
Undergraduates and graduates
may 'now apply for 19 fellowships
offered for study in Mexico by the
Institute of International Educa-
tion.
Undergraduates are eligible for
awards in physicaf anthropology,
archeology, ethnology, Mexican
history, architecture, philosophy
and, letters.
Graduates may apply for grants
in all of the undergraduate courses
in addition to museography, paint-
ing, biological sciences, pediatrics,
tropical medicine and cardiology.

ing accommodation if desired will
be included for the Illinois game,
Nov. 3 and the Cornell game, Nov.
10. One game ticket per train tick-
et will be available for the Illinois
game; but no ducats accompany
railroad reservations for the Cor-
nell tilt.
In addition to sponsoring the
trips, the club is also- in charge of
flashcards to be used at home
games. A new system has been de-
vised for the use of the long
awaited cards which will be avail-
able for the Michigan State and
all other games, Gibbon said.
Also under way are plans for a
name-the-Wolverine contest. More
details will be announced later, he
said.

I__ -~IIII

EXTRA ADDED
FRANKIE ARLE AND HIS ORCHESTRA

11

1111

-.i

Idd

J

?OMORR(
gp' O

"A full an
"A p

d forceful film."
-Bosley Crowther, N. Y. Times
Actun of admirable quality."
-Archsr Winsten, N. Y. Post

[DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an organizations at which both men an
official publication of the University women are to be present must be ap
of Michigan for which the Michigan proved by the Dean of Students. Ap
Daily assumes no editorial responsi- plication forms and a copy of regula
bility. Publication in it is construe- tions governing these events may b
tive notice to all members of the secured in the Office of Student Af
University. Notices should be sent fairs, 1059 Administration Building
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room Requests for approval must be sub
2552 Administration Building before mitted to that office NO LATER THA
3 p.m. the day preceding publication NOON OF THE MONDAY BEFOR
(11 a.m. on Saturday). THE EVENT IS SCHEDULED. A hs
of approved social events will be pub
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1951 lished in the Daily Official Bulleti
on Wednesday of each week.
LXii, NO. 3 In planning social programs for tb
semester, social chairmen will want t
Notices keep in mind the action of thec
snittee on Student Affairs which re
Social events sponsored by student quires that the calendar be kept clew

MALPAGALAA - 4
OW, SAT., SUN. i orrin 9Joanab{
urnj CINfM and iwran~Gda

A

'4%

or

zo """

Ph. 5651zxciussvc r mvuycmva

'II

Typewriters
Adding Machines
Duplicators
Wire Recorders
All makes new and used.

Office Equinment

Student Supplies
Fountain Pens
Stationery
Loose Leaf Note Books
Greeting Cards
Typewriter Supplies
Gifts and Novelties

RnlInki- ce-dA rcnfati

rP_

Dougnr,. saia, renrea, re- I

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Ili

11

111

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