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January 08, 1952 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-01-08

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PAGE FIVE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1

Wow

Mass Meeting
For Michigras
'Will Ro I-I1lrI

Spivak, Long will Furnish Music
For Tropical Setting of '52 J-Hop
* * * *

7 T V G N ~ 1i ll .__ _
Annual Dance
Students To Organize
For Work on Annual o Be Given
All-Campus Carnival 0Fb8
Un Ne , .

Michigras central committee
members hope that students have
made a New Year's resolution to
attend the Michigras Mass Meet-
ing to be held at 7:15 p.m. Thurs-
day, in the Union Ballroom.
Jack Hamer, '52, general co-
chairman, says that the gigantic:
proportions of the carnival will
make it necessary for there to be
more central committee workers
than for any other all-campus
event.
THE CENTRAL committee re-
quests the presence of students!
with all kinds of talent, including
artists, writers, construction work-
ers, ticket takers, decorators and
contact men.
A central committee spokes-
man stated, "We want muscle
men and just plain workers to
come to the meeting which will
give everyone a chance to get
acquainted with the work that
will be done by the various
committees.
1950 Michigras was attended by
over 25,000 persons in its two-day
run at Yost Field House, and an
even greater number is anticipated
for this year by the committee.
Michigras
There will be a Michigras
central committee meeting at 7
p.m. today in the Union. All
committee chairmen are asked
to be present.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Couples will find themselves
whirling to the theme of "Artistry
in Orchid" at the 1952 J-Hop
which will be held from 9 p.m. to
2 a.m. Feb. 8 and 9 in the Intra-
mural Building.
Probably influenced by the chill
of Ann Arbor weather, the J-Hop
committee members have chosen a
SouthsSea Island theme, complete
with sandy beaches, palm trees
and a multitude of orchid clusters.
EVERY COED attending the
dance will receive, in keeping with
the theme. one large. exotic or-
chid.
Music for the tropical setting
will be provided by the orches-
tras of Charlie Spivak and
Johnny Long.
This will not be the first local
appearance for Spivak. The "man
who plays the sweetest trumpet
in the world" played at the 1949
J-Hop. He is known for his soft,
smooth trumpet music which is
featured most of the time while
his orchestra is playing.
SPIVAK LEADS an eight-year-
old band which has recently
played in two movies, the Para-
mount and the Hotel Statler in
New York. the Palladium in Holly-
wood and other well-known spots.
T h e top - rated bandleader
started his career in New Ha-
ven, Conn., his hometown, where
he got his first trumpet while
in grade school. He attended
Hill House School there, study-
ing the trumpet on his own
time.
The fact that Spivak's family
had chartered out a medical ca-
reer for him didn't alter Spivak's
decision to take to the brass, and
when Paul Specht, then one of the
country's outstanding bandleaders,
offered him a job, he signed and
remained wiht the outfit for five
years.

Panhel Plans
Mass Meeting
Women To Register
For Rushing Season
Freshman, sophomore and jun-
ior women who wish to register for
the formal rushing period are
urged to attend a mass meeting
which Will be held at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow in the Rackham Build-
ing.
Registration will take place im-
mediately following the meeting.
Coeds are requested to bring $1
to the meeting as a registration
fee.
* * *
COEDS WHO are not able to
attend the meeting may register
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday in
the Undergraduate Office of the
League.
Rosemary Wise, Panhellenic
rushing chairman, will preside
over the meeting, which is held
every year to inform prospective
rushees about rushing.
The formal rushing period will
begin February 2. Opening teas
will be held Saturday and Sunday,
and the first set of parties will be-
gin Monday.
* * *
AT THE MEETING, prospective
rushees wil obtain booklets which
contain information covering all
aspects of rushing--from a map
showing the location of all the
sorority houses to what the coeds
can expect at the parties.
Also included in the booklet
will be open house cards, which
the rushee may fill out and leave
at each house during open teas.
Each coed must attend every
house during the opening teas.
1RUSHING WILL take place be-
tween semesters as it did last year.
Previously, rushing was held dur-
ing the first two weeks of classes
but last year the system was
changed to include only the first
week.
Marianna Larson, chairman of
s counselors, will discuss the coun-
, seling service for rushees. Each
rushee will be notified of her
counselor at a later date.
s A meeting will be held February
y 3 to discuss more thoroughly any
s questions rushees may have about
r counseling.

By LORRAINE BUTLER ;
With the ringing in of 1952,
came the official opening of 12
months of supposed opportunityj
for the feminine sex, leap year.
There were various reactions ob-
served and comments made on the
prospects of the new year in dif-
ferent parts of the country, in-
cluding Ann Arbor.
* * *
CENSUS FIGURES show that
there are less men than there used
to be, and this may give the
"stronger" sex an optimistic out-
look and more reason to shy away
from determined women.
Most bachelors who have com-
mented on the subject of leap
year exhibit wariness but also
show signs of being flattered by
the thoughts of proposals.
One of the most hurried precau-
tions taken was by John Talbot,
Jr., society president of the Bache-
lors Club of America.
* * *
UPON BEING reminded of leap
year, Talbot said, looking alarmed,
"I'd forgotten. The club will have

an emergency meeting right away.
Bachelors can't be too careful."
Guy Mitchell, bachelor singer,
said "I would suggest a girl sort
of pop the question in a kiddin'
way. Then if the fellow doesn't
want to take her up on it, he
can kid about it too and no-
body's feelings are hurt."
Mitchell, insisted that he would
not mind being proposed to, al-
though he figures that leap year
is more for shy men, which he says
"He isn't."
"THE TYPE OF guy who may be
a little unsure needs a girl to sort
of take the initiative," the popular
singer stated. "The girl can make
kind of a joke of it, and at least
she gets his mind on the subject.
Then he can take it from there,"
Mitchell suggested.
"I'm in the mood to get mar-
ried. If a girl asked me. and I
loved her, I'd say 'yes'," **
Bachelor Russell Nype com-
mented. The twenty-eight year
old Nype is appearing on Broad-
way in "Call Me Madam."
Then proceeding to Ann Arbor,

BEWARE OF WOMEN:
New LeapYear Brings Varied Reactions

it was found that a few women
are very pessimistic about the
prospects of anohter leap year and
many of the men do not believe
leap year will make any differ-
ence.
' *
ONE COED commented "I think
leap year would be wonderful-
if there were only something to
pick from."
A man student said that every
year is leap year to a woman.
"The modern girl is aggressive,
let's face it." The young man
appeared, however, to be looking
forward to the new adventure.
NOW OF COURSE there is no
legal basis for a woman to pro-
pose during leap year, but in 1928
a Scottish law made it officially
proper for a "mayden ladye of
bothe high and low estait-to be-
speke ye man she likes."
It is said that the. only way
the man had to escape marrying
the leap year huntress was to
already be married to someone
else.
"Them there were the days!"

CHARLIE SPIVAK

* * 4
HE NEXT joined the Benny Pol-
lack Band and following that, the
Dorsey Brothers and Ray Noble
orchestras.
After organizing h i s own
band, he got his first big es-
gagement at the Glen Island
Casino and continued f r o m
there to the Hotel Statler and
the Commodore in New York
where he broke GleneMiller's
and Jimmy Dorsey's records.
A highlight in his career was an
award by Downbeat Magazine as
the top sweet band.
** *
LONG IS also familiar to col-
lege crowds. He is rated among
the top three colegiate orchestras
and has appeared at major thea-

By Order of the Federal Authorities

* * *
tres and locations all over the na-
tion.
A Sigma Nu, he is constantly
in demand to play at the func-
tions of their chapters.
Long was born on a farm near
Newell, North Carolina in 1914.
The "backward" violinist began
studying that instrument at the
age of five, and as the result of
an injury, learned to bow with the
left hand and finger with the
right.
* * *
HE DID concert work at the age
of 10 and continued until he was
sixteen. At 17, he entered Duke
where he majored in English. In
1931, 11 freshmen organized a co-
operative band, calling themselves
"The Freshman Orchestra." They
alternated playing at the men's
and women's dining halls for their
meals.
During the summers the band
played at a resort in North Ciar-
olina and the guests were sur-
prised that the second year, the
instrumentalists were "The Duke
Sophomores," then "The Duke
Juniors," and finally "The Duke
Collegians.
Following their graduation i
June 1935, the band began taking
professional dates. From there
Long and his orchestra began
climbing steadily to the top.
Tickets to the "biggest dance o
the year" can be purchased from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. this week a
a booth in the Administratio;
Building.
Ticket sales are open to junior
today, juniors and seniors tomor
row and juniors, seniors and grad
uate students on Thursday an
Friday. A general ticket sale wil
open to the entire campus on Sat
urday.
Those students who made reser
vations before vacation may pic
up their tickets any day this wee
in the Administration Building.
free ticket will go to the junio
representatives of the first 10 resi
dences which have 70 per cent o
their house attending the dance
Lists may be turned in at th
ticket booth.

.L .":..:":4..,t" " ":b ." r'Y" " .... ......... ..... . . .. . . 'S.'34
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<.-
'ses .C. III -
H" ta.. Jwer
" 4,Si
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Coats... Suits
Vhy al Dresses ... Skirts
Claa c Blouses. . Handbags
Sale "Hats ... Jewelry
V4 at
ALL SALES FINAL 1/Z f
S. State Just Of f
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Union Opera
Promotions 1committee of the
1952 Union Opera will meet at
4:30 p.m. tomorrow in the
Union. According to M a r k
Sandground, the meeting is
open to all persons interested in
alumni relations, artistic de-
sign and radio and television
contracts.

--..

JANUARY

/ /

-MUST BE DISCONTINUED -
oI..

of S

0

S1

AM
of

-

11

11

It's "rush"
time again --
Check your needs for
PERSONALIZED
Guest Towels - Notes
Matches - Invitations
Place Cards -- Stationery
PLEDGE PINS available for de-
livery where your national regu-
lations permit.
FREE-WHILE THEY LAST
Greek Letter Blotters -
Phone Pads

EVERYTHING MUST BE SOLD TO THE BARE WALLS!!
A $50,000 Stock Going Out For $20,000!
SALE NOW IN PROGRESS

IL. G. Balfour Co.
1319 So. University Ph. 3-1733

850 prs. MEN'S SHOES
1200 prs. WOMEN'S SHOES
We are badly overstocked with Hi-Grade Winter Shoes . . . Out
they go. Take advantage of the greatest bargains we have
ever offered.

J

i

1 11

(Note These Prices on Nationally Famous
FOR MEN FOR W
Florsheim's Reg. to 20.95 . $16.90 Florsheims, Reg
Discontinued Styles Entire Sto
235 prs. Reg. to 17.95 ...*$13.90 Enna-Jetticks .
By Bostonians, Weyenbergs Reg. to
265 prs. Reg. to 14.95 .... $11.90 Very Special
By Bostonians-Weyenberg-Howard & Foster 250 Pairs
220 prs. Reg. to 12.95 .. . . $9.90
By Weyenbergs-Mansfield-Plymouth
150 prs. Reg. to 11.95.... $7.90R es.
$10.95
Also 10% OFF on many of our higher-priced Fats, Casuals, Sport
custom grade shoes and Dress Styles
for Men-Bostonian-Weyenberg-M assagic By Dolmode, Golo, Dayti
Ynu will want 2 nr 3 nairs at these Drices.

Shoes)
(OMEN
. to 17.95 . $9.90
k Included
..$5.90 to $8.90
o$12.95

Get your share of 1001 amazing bargains!

Hurry! Hurry! Hurry!

x

SEE THURSDAY'S PAPER FOR ITEMIZED LIST
OF SENSATIONAL BARGAINS
ANN ARBOR SAYS: "GOODBYE FOREVER" TO:

mer, Modern Miss, Footrest

'V U - ~III!J~li7Ii

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