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January 08, 1952 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-01-08

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1952

TH IHG N DAniniILYme

TUESDAY, 3AMJARY R, 195Z

SEEKS ALEUTIAN RELICS:
'U' Student Heads Project

Clements Library Exhibit
Features Arnold Letters

s s C s

By HELENE SIMON
"Come up and see my ancient
skulls and whalebone harpoons."
This is the sort of invitation
that could be extended by Theo-
dore Bank, II, Grad., who is car-
rying on a program of ethnobo-
tanical and anthropological re-
search in the Aleutian Islands.
* * *
THE PURPOSE of the research
project, which began in 1948, is to
determine the chronology of the
Aleutians-its plants and people.
Archeological specimens brought
back are dated by carbon-14, a
radioactive isotope of carbon
Last summer Banks was ac-
companied on his Northern trip
by his wife, Janet, of the an-
thropology department, their
one year old son, Junior, and
three students not connected
with the University.
The expedition brought back an
archeological bounty of skeletons,
whalebone needles, harpoons, a
toy made out of the shoulderbone
of a seal, clothes constructed from
walrus intestines, grass baskets
and labrettes which were worn in
slits cut in the cheeks and the
lower lips. The last item "prob-
ably made it pretty tough to eat
soup," Banks ventured.
* * *
"MOST AMERICANS think of
the Aleutians as barren God-for-
saken rocks," Banks said. "This
is not so. "Actually it is warmer
there than it is in Michigan. The
temperature never goes below 11
degrees. However there are fierce
winds that roar over the islands at
125 m.p.h."
Much of the research was
done in volcano craters where
the Aleuts mummified their
dead. The expedition had a nar-
row escape when a volcano in
which they had spent the last
days investigating, erupted very
near their tent.
Besides fiery volcanos, the
'anks had to cope with other
problems. Drinking water was
very likely to be poisonous. Trans-
portation from island to island
had to be done in small boats

THEODORE BANK 11

through fog and wind. They had
to live on the same diet as the
Aleuts, which consisted of such
delicacies as seal, sea lion and oc-
topus. Bank considers "seal liver"
"the best food I've ever tasted."
THEIR SON Junior has prob-
ably had a more interesting ex-
perience in one year than most
American boys accumulate inha
lifetime. He can boast to his
friends that he teethed on a
whalebone and has seen such un-
usual sights as a herd of whales.
He was taken into the Aleut- tribe
and christened 'Isuk' which means
"Little Seal."
The condition of the Aleuts,
which are part of the Eskimo
race, is pretty sad, Bank believes.
"They may become extinct."
Since they were discovered in
the 18th century, their popula-
tion has decreased from 20,000
to less than 700.
"The Aleuts are starving in the
midst of plenty," Bank pointed
out. They are using Western me-
thods and starving because they

have forgotten how to use the
plants that are all around. They
prefer to use the Sears, Roebuck
catalog, which they look upon as
"great benefactor."
If anyone is planning an expe-
dition to some primitive land, the
young botanist advises taking
along a woman. "Mrs. Bank was a
great help when it came to getting
information from the native wo-
men, as they were too shy to talk
to the men. "Of course," he added,
"the choice will have to be a care-
ful one."
Union To Alter
Orgyanization
A proposed series of drastic re-
visions in the Union constitution
will be presented to Union mem-
bers this week, Union President
John Kathe, '52P, announced yes-
terday.
The meeting, open to all Un-
ion members, will be held be-
tween 4 and 6 p.m. Thursday in
Rm. 3-A, Union.

By JOYCE FICKIES
One of the most dramatic epi-
sodes of the American Revolution,
the treason of Benedict Arnold, is
related in letters and books now
on display at the Clements Lib-
rary.
The display, part of a nation-
wide series commemmorating the
150th anniversary of the U.S. Mil-
itary Academy at West Point, was
set up at the request of the
Academy Librarian who asked
libraries all over the nation to co-
operate in the observance.
* * .
A HIGHLIGHT of the exhibit
is "one of the most treasonable
documents in American history,"
the code letter in which Benedict
Arnold offered to surrender West
Point 'to the British for 20,000
pounds.
Benedict wrote the letter to
Major John Andre, the brilliant
DRIP!
Broken Pipe
Forces Delta
Zetas to Move
A mass migration to the Wo-
ment's League has been executed
by all members of Delta Zeta Sor-
ority who have established tempor-
ary residence there while damages
from a flood caused by a broken
water pipe are being repaired at
the house on Geddes.
When the cleaning woman re-
ported for work last Thursday she
discovered the broken pipe line
and subsequent flood which had
affected first, second and bottom
floors of the soitrity house.
Dean of Women Deborah Bacon
immediately set about making
plans for accommodations from
the soon-to-be-returning Delta
Zetas, and forewarning them by
telegrams of the new change in
address they could expect.
The Women's League has done
everything in their power to make
the homeless sorority girls com-
fortable, and a home-like atmos-
phere is beginning to be achieved
up on fourth floor League.
Just how long this new "home
away from home" at the League
will be the lodging for the Delta
Zetas is not known, but repairs on
the sorority house have been
started and it is hoped that they
will be completed soon.

young aide-de-campe of Sir
Henry Clinton, British com-
mander in chief in North Amer-
ica. Andre handled all of the
intelligence work for Clinton
and was the man who went up
the river to see Benedict Arnold.
He was captured by the Ameri-
cans and hanged as a spy.
The loss of his young officer
and personal friend was a great
blow to Clinton. He retained all of
Andre's papers; and, these docu-
ments, along with other books and
manuals concerning the war,
were saved and passed down
through Clinton's family.
* * *
THE COLLECTION includes
sixty-eight letters and a long nar-
rative sent by Sir Henry Clinton
to Lord George Germain. A num-
ber of maps of West Point, man-
uals on military strategy which
were available to the Revolution-
ary soldiers and two books are also
included.
The highlights of this collec-
tion: some maps and manuals,
the two rare editions of the
court martials of Arnold and
Andre and the letter from Sir
Henry to his sisters saying that
"the horrid deed is done" will
be displayed in the Library un-
til April 1.
The material was given to the
Library by William L. Clements,
alumnus and former regent of the
University who foundedthe Li-
brary. He purchased the collection
from descendents of Clinton's in
England.

Donor List
For Phoenix
Hits 30,000
The list of Phoenix Project con-
tributors has grown to almost
30,000 with the publication of a
supplementary "M Honor Roll."
This supplement was recently
sent to the University's more than
145.000 alumni by the Phoenix
Project. Student contributors,
6,811, in all, are included. An ear-
lier Honor Roll honored the first
15,000 contributors.
The honor roll also included a
report on Phoenix progress by
Dean Ralph Sawyer of the. grad-
uate school, director of the pro-
ject. This report has been previ-
ously published in The Daily.
The publication is expected to
stimulate interest and inform
donofs on the Phoenix Project.
Honor Rolls will soon be distri-
buted to most student centers, and
additional copies will be available
at the information desk in the Ad-
ministration Bldg.

After living in the cramped
quarters of 1503 Washtenaw, the
Chi Omegas finally moved over
the vacation into their spacious
new sorority house.
Trunkful after trunkful of
sweaters, text books and other
precious possessions were piled
high on toboggans which Lambda
Chi fraternity offered to slide
down to the new house.
IFC Liquidating
Bookstore Stock
The IFC bookstore which closed
down this fall is liquidating its
stock, according to Norm Thomas,
'53, bookstore manager.
Students who left books in the
ptore and have not yet picked
them up must do so this week be-
tween 3:30 and 5:30 p.m. at the
Student Legislature Bldg., 122 S.
Forest.
If the books are not picked up
by Friday afternoon, students lose
title to them, Thomas said.

Chi Omegas Change Cramped
Quarters for Roomy Mansion

A STICKY second floor and
bedrooms stacked with paintpots
and brushes greeted the new resi-
dents as they stepped into the yet
uncompleted house.
"Where are we going to get
enough furniture to fill the
mansion?" is a problem that is
vexing the sorority. The "man-
sion" has 23 bedrooms and when
the occasion warrants, 90 peo.
ple can be seated in the large
dining room.
But there is one problem that
has been solved....
According to a proud Chi Ome-
ga, it is impossible to lean on the
buzzer when couples are kissing
goodnight. In the old home, which
has housed Chi Omegas since
1905, many a coed embarrassed
herself when she unknowingly
backed into the front-door buzzer.
The Chi Omegas are 'also pat-
ting themselves on the back for
what they think is the most won-
derful thing about their new house
-it's all paid for.

AFTFR - INVENTORY
CLEARANCE SALE OF MEN"SWEAR

Your Choice
All Zip-Out Lining
TOPCOATS
(Covert and Gabardine)
Reg. $62.50
Now $41.00

ALL SUITS
20%o off
Small Group
at Greater Reductions

All
Sport Coats
Reduced
20i

'd

CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
(Nationally Accredited)
An outstanding college serving
a splendid profession.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing with sixty or more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts
courses.
REGISTRATION FEB. 25
Students are granted profes-
sional recognition by the U. S.
Department of Defense and
Selective Service.
Excellent clinical facilities.
Athletic and recreational activi-
ties. Dormitories on the campus.
CHICAGO COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
350 Belden Avenue
Chicago 14, Illinois

Reg. $17.50
CORDUROY SPORT COATS. . .....
$6.00 All Wool Pullover
SWEATERS (Yellow Only) ...... .,..
$3.95 Group (Slightly Soiled)
DRESS SHIRTS.................
$3.95 Group (slightly soiled)
PAJAMAS......................
$17.50 Group
POPLIN JACKETS...............

$13.95 1 All Slacks .,... 20% off

$3.95,
$2.45
$2.95
$5.00

All Robes

* *.**J* 3 Off

All Poplin & Gabardine
Jackets .. *... 20%off
All Rainwear.. 20% off
ALL WOOL
Sport Shirts ... 20% off

$4.95
TUXEDO DRESS SHIRTS.

........ 2.951

ALL SALES FINAL - ALTERATIONS AT COST
MEN'S TOGGEBY
Next to Michigan Theatre

HUGHES
COOPERATIVE PLAN
for
MASTER of SCIENCE
DEGREES

607 East Liberty

IL

at MAST'S .. .

Tremendous Savings for Everyone!
GROUP 1 GPOU IP

LEARAN(E

PURPOSE
To assist outstanding BS graduates in
obtaining their Master of Science De-
grees while employed in industry and
making a significant contribution to
important military work.
ELIGIBILITY
June 1952 graduates receiving BS De-
grees in the following fields:
Electrical Engineering
Electronic Engineering
Physics
Mechanical Engineering
Aeronautical Engineering
Those chosen to participate in this plan
will be from the upper portion of their
graduating classes or will have evi-
denced unusual technical ability. They
must also have evidenced imaginative
ability and possess personality traits
enabling them to work well with others.
CITIZENSHIP
Applicants must be United States citi-
zens who can be cleared for "Secret,"
due to their work at Hughes Research
and Development Laboratories being of
a classified nature.
PARTICIPATING UNIVERSITIES
The University of California. at Los
Angeles and the University of Southern
California will participate in this pro-
gram, and candidates for Master of
Science Degrees must meet entrance re-
quirements for advanced study at these
schools.
PROGRAM
Under this Cooperative Plan, starting
June 1952, the following schedule of
employment at Hughes is arranged:
Full time-from June 1952 to Sept. 1952
Half time-from Sept.1952 toJune 1953
Full time-from June 1953 to Sept. 1953
Half time-fromSept.1953 toJune 1954

a university half time during regular
sessions working on his Master's De-
gree.
SALARIES
Salaries will be commensurate with the
individual's ability and experience and
reflect the average in the electronics in-
dustry. Salary growth will be on the
same basis as full-time members of the
engineering staff. In addition, the indi-
viduals will be eligible for health, ac-
cident, and life insurance benefits, as
well as other benefits accruing to full-
time members.
TRAVEL AND MOVING EXPENSES
For those residing outside of the South-
ern California area, actual travel and
moving expenses will be allowed up to
10% of the full starting annual salary.
TUITION
Tuition at either UCLA or USC, cover-
ing the required number of units neces-
sary to obtain a Master's Degree, will
be paid by Hughes Research and De-
velopment Laboratories.
NUMBER OF AWARDS
Approximately one hundred Coopera-
tive Awards shall be made each year, if
sufficient qualified candidates present
themselves.
SELECTION OF CANDIDATES
Candidates will be selected by a com-
mittee of representation composed of
two each from the University of Cali-
fornia at Los Angeles, the University of
Southern California, and the Hughes Re-
search and Development Laboratories.

ME N'S

MEN'S

SHORT LOTS
One
Price
Out they go! 213 pairs of real
quality shoes. This group has
everything but not in all sizes.
Values to $18.95. Genuine
crepe soles, leather soles, tans,
smoked elk, wine, brown and
blue.

SAMPLE SHOES

4

SIZES 7 and 71/2
$ 500
VALUES TO $14.95
A good selection in
this group. Mostly in
loafer patterns.

GROUP 3

I

GROU P 3
MEN'S
ARMY and NAVY
SHOES
Made On OFFICIAL NAVY LAST

i

969 Prs. Men's Shoes
Prices Slashed 20 and 30%
MEN, every pair of quality shoes is a bargain
at the presnt time. This is a sale no one can
afford to pass up. Our stocks are complete,
including many new patterns bought for Spring
selling.

t {
11
M1

DATES FOR APPLYING
Informal applications should be mailed
prior to January 30, 1952. The Lab-
oratories will then forward formal ap-
plications, which should be returned,
accommnied by ln-tera de trap.-

I

in

IU -mmz i

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