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December 16, 1951 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE EL

ANN ARBOR SANTA CLAUS:
Toymaker Brings Cheer to Children

LIFEMANSHIP EXPERT:
Potter Advances Art
f tChrgmns-Shi

FOREIGN STUDENTS VIEWS:
Yule Spirit Same All Over

4

PREPARING FOR CHRISTMAS:
Ann Arbor's Santa Claus, Al Warnoff, seems to consider himself
in a little boy's paradise surrounded by toys. The 1,435 toys com-
pleted have filled Mr. Warnoff's workshop and overflowed into
his bedroom and garage.
Toy Shop Added to Salvation
ArmyChristmastide Projects

"Crusaders of kindness" might
be a good name for the Ann Arbor
Salvation Army in this pre-Christ-
mas season.
Besides their regular duties of
supplying Christmas dinners,
clothing and entertainment to
those in need, the Salvation Army
has added a new feature-a toy
sliop-to their list of projects.
Just starting this year, the
toy shop will be a haven for
children whose parents have no
money to spend on Christmas
toys for their children.
The toys will be given to parents
of impoverished families who will
be invited to the shop to pick out

and Saturday at the toy shop
on Washington St.
Anyone who wishes to contribute
to the toy collection has been
urged to do so. Only new toys will
be accepted as the Salvation Army
wants to give the best quality gifts
possible to the underprivileged
youngsters.
Money for all Salvation Army
undertakings is derived from'the
street kettles and written appeals.
Four college groups have been do-
nating their services to man street
kettles-Alpha Omicron Pi, Adelia
Cheever, Trigon and Zeta Psi-in
an effort to help the Army's cause.
Other campus groups are rais-
ing money and donating toys to
the toy shop in a further attempt
to spread Christmas good will
through the medium of Salvation
Army.

By HELENE SIMON
Unless Ann Arbor's Santa Claus,
Al Warnoff, can find someone to
take his place, many sick and
homeless children will be deprived
of the joy that the kindly old
man's toys brings them each
Chritmas.
For 45 years Al Warnoff has de-
voted his spare time in his work-
shop sawing, hammering and
painting toys to give to sick, blind
and orphaned youngsters. Al-
though most of his toys go to' the
children in Michigan institutions,
he has answered requests from all
over the country. Some of his toys
have ended up in such far off
places as Japan and Holland.
EVEN WITHOUT the aid of
eight reindeer, he delivers most of
his toys in person. He receives no
money for his work. "The look on
those grateful children's faces is
all the pay I could ask for."
"I get my biggest push to go
on with my work from the blind
children at the Michigan State
School for the Blind at Lans-
ing, because if it weren't for me
they would go without toys."
The friendly gray-haired man
started making his cheery toys
when he was 16. "The little girl
across the street was sick with
diphtheria. I made her a cradle
and a doll. The doctor said since
I was so good I should continue
the good work. And I did."
Since that first doll and cradle
he estimates that he has made ap-
proximately 20,000 toys.
WARNOFF makes the toys all
by himself except for sororities
and women's clubs that sew for
him, making blankets and stuffed
animals. He considers that "the
ladies are my biggest helpers."
As to the source of his energy
to work all evening in his toy-
filled worshop after working all
day in a lumbershop, he said,
"Sometimes I come home tired
and with a headache, but I for-
get everything when I'm down
in my workshop."
Although Ann Arborites have
dubbed him the town's Santa
Claus, Warnoff's satisfied just be-
one of his helpers. "After all," he
grinned, "I can't be Santa be-
cause I weigh only 130 pounds."
* *
MANY PEOPLE have helped
Warnoff in his warm-hearted pro-
ject. He has received material with
which to work from the lumber
yard where he is employed, busi-
ness firms and "I don't know
where."
He usually makes the same
toys every year. When he gets a
new Idea for a toy he doesn't
start work on It until "Mama,"
his wife, gives him the go ahead
sign.

The science of Lifemanship as
advanced by Stephen Potter in his
thesis on the subject has been re-
cently supplemented by "Christ-
mas-Ship, or, the Art of Giving
and Receiving" in the December
issue of a national magazine.
Lifemanship consists of "being
one up on the expert and of mak-
ing the other fellow feel like a
cad without being a cad one's
self"; and Christmas-ship contin-
ues along the same line with the
avowed purpose of "never losing
the unassailable one-upness of the
expert and making one's niceness
feel uhpleasant."
Local campus Lifemen, among
them leaders in sportsmanship,
journalism and filmmanship en-
dorsed several of Potter's more in-
genious gambits.
ACCORDING TO Potter the ob-
ject of Christmas Giftmanship is:
1. To make everyone present
feel that the receiver is getting
something better than he has
given you.
2. To make the receiver feel
he has given you a present that
looks all right but which really
isn't.
3. To make the receiver feel
that there is some implied cri-
ticism about the present you
have chosen.
He suggests that a "rather
dowdy-looking woman who prides
herself on not always dabbing with
a powder puff can in certain tones
of voice effectively be presented
with a beauty box." Conversely, a
woman who is insidiously ostenta-
tious about the flowerlike quality
of her beauty can be given a hot-
water bottle, a small Shetland
shawl to wear in bed.
FOR THE going-one-better ap-
proach to giftmanship Potter sug-
gests that if someone gives you a
new deluxe edition of Jane Austen

V E '...AD u U/9.e./EEU' i 1

.,W/I k.. N S 5/N
in a stand-up cardboard case, "you
might immediately buy any old
nineteenth-century copy of a
George Eliot novel and make the
Jane Austen giver feel a fool by
telling him you have hunted for
four years for this example of the
Bristol Edition (call it a "Bristol
First," he says) and that when
you found it six months ago you
knew he would be the person to
appreciate it."
For more advanced Lifeman,
Potter cites the gambit of gift-
ing eminent art critics with
"The World's Best Twenty Mas-.
terpieces in Oil" done in rather
poor color reproductions, with
the "dirty pinks nearly brown
and the browns nearly dirty."
Especially recommended is
giving expensive presents to: (a)
people who think they are help-
ing you financially (b) those to
whom you owe money.
The basic gambit for treatment'
of children is to give them presents
a few years below their age group.
"If the child is continuously bury-
ing itself in the corner with 'War
and Peace,' give it a book about a
wild wolf dog which saves a baby
from an eagle."
Local Lifeman Herman A. Marx,
'52, offered additional suggestions
yesterday under the Christmas
treemanship category.
"If your host has on display a
rather small tree, ignore it," he
said,s"until after dinner. Then use
it as a toothpick." If, however,
your host has gone all the way in
the opposite direction to secure a
mammoth tree, extravagently saw-
ing off the top three feet of
branches, a comment is called for
such as "how nice to make one's
home a veritable forest once a
year," gathering quills "to make
a bed for some less fortunate
soul."

By MARGE SHEPHARD
"The spirit of Christmas is the
same in any country," foreign stu-
dents reply when asked about
their native holiday celebrations.
The same theme of family
gatherings, colorful decorations
and gift exchange exists every-
where, but it's the specific ways of
observances of the individual
countries that make for varia-
tions.
* * *
IN GERMANY and Holland, as
in many European countries all
the gaiety and fun-making of the
holiday are separated from the
actual religious observance of the
birth of Christ.
Germany's Saint Nicholas day
is marked on Dec. 6 when the
servant of Father Christmas ap-
pears to put gifts in children's
shoes which have been expect-
antly placed on the window sills.
A big part of the celebration is
the baking of a Christmas man
and woman for each child in
the family.
Candles, real ones, are every-
where - throughout the homes,
churches and on the Christmas
tree, according to Erika Fritzen,
'53, a German student. The first
Sunday in December a special
candle is lit to mark the advent
of Christmas and each week until
the 25th another is added.
IN BELGIUM and Holland, St.
Nicholas is accompanied by a ser-
vant who frightens the children,
since they know that if they
Michigan
Gifts
Sheaffer Fineline Pencils
with a Michigan Seal.. $1.50
Ash Trays with Michigan
Seal ..............12c up
Michigan Book Ends. ... $2.75
Michigan Scrap Books. . .$2.00
Michigan Stuffed
Animals......... $1.25 up
Michigan Pennants and
Pillows..........ali prices
Cocktail Glasses.. .8 for $2.95
Beer Mugs.. . . 79c and $2.95
Musical Cigarette Box.. $10.95
Musical Footballs...... $3.25
Michigan Song Book. . . .$1.75
Michigan Playing Cards.. $2.25

haven't been good he will stuff
them in his bag and- carry them
to Spain.
St. Nick, dressed in a somber
Cardinal's robe and hat, comes
by water or air from Spain, but
rides a stately white steed
throughout the towns, where he
is received reverently by every-
one. 4
As part of the celebration in the
Dutch students' clubs, according
to Fred Lutter, Grad., a mock St.
Nicholas, riding on a decrepite,
mangy work horse, parades into
the club, accompanied by his help-
ers. Upon his arrival he is am-
bushed by dozens of other imita-
tors and in a general free for all
is driven from the club.
C M * * * F
CHRISTMAS festivities in Fin-

land last about three days, accord-
ing to Bergt Broms. Grad. Be-
ginning on Dec. 25 with a big fam-
ily feast, the celebration is cli-
mixed on the 26th with the ar-
rival of Joulupukki (Santa Claus)
who comes down out of the moun-
tains in the north.
In t h e Eastern countries,
where Christians are in a min-
ority, New Year's celebrations
are often the most colorful and.
joyful events of the year.
According to Ken Kang, Grad.,
from Korea, everyone is happy at
New Years because he is one year
older and therefore gains that
much esteem from his associates.
During the celebration, which
lasts about two weeks, great im-
portance is attached to the visit-
ing of friends and relatives.

MAKEUP CASE
Alligator leatherette with wash-
able lining and vanity mirror,
Various styles and sizes. Har-
monizing colors in beautiful fin-
ishes. Sturdy construction.
Begin at $5.00
ty'Plus Tax
UTILITY KITS
Saddle stitched plastic zippered
r case fitted with mirror, hair
brush and separate boxes for all
a man's grooming needs. Wash-
able lining, handsome finishes.
Begin at $2.50
NO CHARGE FOR GOLD MONOGRAMMING
LUGGAGE SHOP
327 South Main St. Phone 3-4013
GIFTS - TRAVELWARE - HANDBAGS

toys to brighten up their child-
ren's holiday.
Official distribution for the
toys will take place on Friday

4

LAST CALL
Y CUhrkstn/aj Uardi4
LARGEST DISPLAY IN THE CITY
Ulrich's Book Store

SAVE 20%
- Stop at KHAYYAM and choose your CHRIT-
MAS GIFT from our hand made and imported
pottery and yet save 20% of the value. Prices run
as low as $1.20.
KHAYYAM
0 719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

Ulrich's Book
Store

I

II _ _ _ _ _
SDiamond Solitai r
with Matching Band
$100
I
I. R I
Rhinestone Necklace
JOIN DANIELS CHRISTMAS CLUB, from 5.00
OPEN A CONVENIENT PAYMENT
ACCOUNT TODAY . . . NEVER
ANY ADDED COST FOR CREDIT.
Lady 's Birthstone
s ° " from 12.50
Lady's Longines,-
fromi 71.50 k
7
j 1141

U

.._

Check 4iouw
9ioft /4 it

,Ride the

'HOL DAY EXPRESS'

U'

STUDENT SPECIAL BUSES
OPERATED NON-STOP

0

To Give You THE MOST Time at Home
Leave Michigan Union FRIDAY, Dec. 21

FICTION - POETRY
RELIGION - BIOGRAPHY
MUSIC - HUMOR
TRAVEL - ART - COOKERY
CHILDREN'S
BOOKS and GAMES
for all ages
DESK SETS
"M" BLANKETS

From Ann Arbor to
CHICAGO
Connections to all points
West and Northwest

ONE WAY
$5 50

ROUND TRIP
$990

* FARES

LEAVE
MICHIGAN
UNION
3:30 p.m.

APPROX.
RUNNING
TIME
61/2 hrs.

CLEVELAND $ 40 $795
Connections for Buffalo,$ 3:30 p.m. 5 hrs.
Erie, Boston, Rochester, Albany
Grand Rapids $ 35 $L05 /
Connections to 3:30 p m.31hhrs.
Muskegon, Traverse City
PITTSBURGH I$ 95 $ 55
Connections to Washington, 3:30 p.m.f 81/ hrs.
Harrisburg, New York City
ST. IGNACE $080 $1r85 80~.11
Connections to all 8 .2hrs.
points in Upper Peninsula I1______________________
plus 15% Fed. Transp. Tax
LIMITED CAPACITY - RESERVATIONS NECESSARY
INFORMATION - TICKETS - RESERVATIONS

CHESS SETS
GIANT PANDAS
PLAYING CARDS
GIFT STATIONERY
CRIBBAGE BOARDS
AUTOBRIDGE SETS
PEN-PENCIL SETS
MICHIGAN SEALED JEWELRY

Available at

I1 THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

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