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December 16, 1951 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWELVE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1~51

CHRISTMAS ANCESTRY:
Influence of Paganism
Shown in Yule Customs

(PAID ADVERTISEMENT)

MEM MONSTROUS SUCCESS:

!Ensian,,

Prices

wise

De.

21

OUT
MONDAY

Although Christmas now con-
veys to most people a religious
significance, the early church fa-
thers once tried to stomp it out as
a remnant of paganism.
Before the age of Christ, the
Saturnalia and the Kalends of
January were held at this time.
The ancient Romans celebrated
with feasting and merry-making,
while the "Lord of Misrule" gov-
erned the city. Masters paid hom-
age to their slaves ' and wierdly
costumed revelers took over the
streets.
Another celebration was held in
Europe in mid-December, when a
CU' instructors,
Wife Creates
Paper Angels
By ALICE BOGDONOFF
Angels are not only made in
heaven.
' With one hana on her two year
old daughter and the other in
paste and paint, Mrs. Richard
Wilt, wife of a University art in-
structor, creates paper machee
angels in her "Santa workshop"
--the cellar.
The angels, which usually reach
a height of three feet or more,
are "simply" made from chicken
wire, and layers of newspaper put
on with wall paper paste, Mrs. Wilt
explained.
However, upon examining a
completed angel, the work seems
far from simple. Minute details
bring to life the carefully con-
structed blue, white and gold
angel.
Tissue paper and paper napkins
are transformed into features,
jewels and colorful costume.
After "around 18 hours of work"
the completed angels are ready for
their descent to Ann Arbor house-
housewives and local store win-
dows.
Angels are not the only bit of
Christmas artistry which emerge
from Mrs. Wilt's basement. The
entire window of a local State, St.
store is brightened up this year by
Mrs. Wilt's display of castles, tap-
eatry and "seasons greetings."
The attrac.tive blond housewife
began this "extra curricular ac-
tivity," as she calls it, in 1939 as
a display artist in Pittsburg.
She made her Michigan debut
last year when the Little Gallery
in Birmingham, Mich. began to
sell her art work.
Last week, Mrs. Wilt delivered
her first order. The buyer - Mrs.
lobert Angel.

general slaughter of cattle and
hogs took place to decrease feed-
ing and shelter problems for the
winter.
IN THE middle ages, the Church
tried to bring an end to these "in-
dulgences of the flesh" and point-
ed out their pagan ancestry. How-
ever, celebrations continued and
the Church accepted the ancient
Saturnalian date as a suitable
time for the celebration of the
birthday of Christ.
Historians have been unable
to discern the exact date of
Christ's birth. It is evident,
however, that it was not in the
month of December for this is
the rainy season in Palestine
and shepherds would not have
been "watching over their flocks
by night" at this time.
The Christmas tree, a well-
known symbol of the yule this sea-
son, originated in Germany. Fron
earliest times, art evergreen tree
was decorated during the winter
and it was incorporated into their
celebration of Christmas.
Perhaps the Romans lent their
touch to this custom, too, for the
laurel spray played a prominent
part in their celebration of .the
Saturnalia.
* s "
CHRISTMAS GIFTS are be-
lieved by many historians to be
an outgrowth of the Roman cus-
tom of rendering gifts yearly to
the emperor. From the earliest
days of the recognition of Christ's
birthday, Christmas has been a
children's holiday and gifts have
been given them from many sup-
ernatural beings.
Wizened old men, misshapen
dwarfs, beautiful fairies and in
some countries the Christ child
Himself have been represented
as the donors.
The United States adopted the
teutonic Santa Claus, a corrup-
tion of the Dutch spelling of Saint
Nicholas.
Although an American immi-
grant, children in the United
States have claimed him for'their
own, and are already anticipating
their yearly "visit from St. Nick."
Orientation Week
Leaders Needed
Men with or without previous
experience are needed as orienta-
tion leaders for the spring ori-
entation period, beginning Feb.
4, according to Chairman Jay
Strickler, '54.
Those interested may apply be-
tween 3 and 5 p.m. tomorrow
through Thursday at the Union
Student offices.

MEMs Plug
Sales With

I

*

*

*

*

*

i

Zany antics
Michiganensian monsters storm-
ed campus Thursday, coaxing and
threatening students to buy the
1952 'Ensian before prices go up to
$5.50 Friday, Dec. 21.
Chanting "Fee, fie, foe, fum:
have you bought your 'Ensian,"
the MEMs invaded classrooms,
businness placesa nd faculty of-
fices clad in hooded black robes
and grotesque masks.
NEARLY TWO dozen student
monsters spent Thursday warnir*
of the approaching price hike.
Women were favored victims of
the MEMs, who took advantage of
their anonymity by embracing
both friends and total strangers.
Most students seemed to enjoy
the MEM antics. However, a few
faculty members did not appre-
ciate the distraction in their
classes.
One professor, writing on the
blackboard, failed to notice the
entry of an 'Ensian monster. As
students in his 'class began to gig-
gle and guffaw, he turned sudden-
ly- and announced a bluebook for
the next class session.
Most embarassing incident of
the day was when a MEM grabbed
another robed figure from behind,
only to discover she was a nun.
One dejected monster reviewed
his sad MEM day story. "I was
slapped on the face in Martha
Cook, kicked out of the Library
and speech class and my own girl
didn't recognize me when I walked
her home," he said.

4
''
"4 j

-

.4

-Daily-Al Reid

MONSTER INTERVIEW-Four MEMs (Michiganensian Monsters) invaded the office of University President Harlan H. Hatcher in
the Administration Building to discuss sales plans. Both-President Hatcher and Vice-President Marvin N. Niehuss (right) said they wanted
to order their 1952 'Ensians before the prices are raised 10 per cent next Friday. MEMs also visited faculty offices in classroom
buildings all over campus.

kT

>t

1t

I

EV ERtYONE VANTS
FROM FOL ETT'S
FOR CHRISTMAS

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"
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SSTJ

we'i f-I5

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*

014

GOOD WILL-Tim eout.was taken by a group of wandering MEMs to assist Salvation Army mem-
bers collect Christmas donations near the Nickels Arcade. The hooded monsters were especially
effective in relieving by-passers of their change, using force when necessary.

-Daily-Al Reid
SCIENTIFIC REVERSE--A botany student was looking for little
monsters in her microscope, but ended up with a big one when
this MEM halted momentarily on his tour of class buildings.

n

4

Ch-ietna4 eugeetione

;r

Fountain Pens
Fountain Pen Desk Sets
Stationary Gift Boxes
Playing Cards
Pinking Shears
Book Ends
Buxton Pocket Books
Robinson Reminders
Photograph Albums
Scrap Books
Brief Cases

Plastic Telephone Covers
(Assorted Colors),
Card Shufflers
Ladies Manicure Sets
Men's Manicure Sets
Diaries
Magnetic Memo Pads
Telephone List Finders
Calendars
Games

;;.

.T

NEW PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
immediate Delivery
SMITH-CORONA

V.
1.

I

i

-irauy-. Xl neia
7TNCTTCPPC!TTVtI VT !TTM TZIIirpntIv ctlidvinr in the main floor

--Daily-Al! Reid

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