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November 27, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-27

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A

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I

I

a

Tennessee

Chosen

First

in

AP

Poll

---

1/2THE RUBBING

36 Gridders Three Wolverines Earn
A37f -/1 !'. Pc

MSC Holds

Get Letters A ll-Conterenu

A+

, .:

Coach Bennie Oosterbaan al
nounced the winners of 1951 foo
ball awards yesterday.
Letter winners were: Jame
T. Balog, Wheaton, Ill.; Bruce
A. Bartholomew, Detroit; Rich
ard A. Beison, East Chicago
Ind.; Donald C. Bennett, Chica,
go, Ill.; Bill E. Billings, Flint,
Wesley E. Bradford, Troy, Ohi(
Robert W. Dingman, Saginaw.
Donald R. Dugger, Columbus
Ohio; Merritt W. Green, Water.
ville, Ohio; Frank Howell, Mus.
kegon Heights; Thomas John.
son, Muskegon Heights; Rai
Thomas Kelsey, Lakewood
Ohio; Peter C. Kinyon, Ann Art
bor; Eugene P. Knutson, Beloit
Wise.
Laurence E. LeClaire, Ana-
conda, Mont.; Duncan B. Mc-
Donald, Flint; Robert Mathesor
Detroit; Donald Oldham, Indi-
anapolis, I n d.; Richard O'.
Shaughnessy, Seaford, N. Y;
Russell J. Osterman, Baraga;
Bernhardt L. Pederson, Mar-
quette.
Lowell W. Perry, Ypsilanti;
Donald W. Peterson, Racine:
Wisc.; Frederick R. Pickard
Grand Rapids; William Putichi
Cleveland, Ohio; Russell Res-
corla, Grand Haven; Leo R.
Schlicht, Madison, Wise.; Thad
C. Stanford, Midland.
Ralph C. Stribe, Detroit; Rob
ert F. Timm, Toledo, Ohio; Da
vid J. Tinkhlam, E. Grand Rap
ids; Ted R. Topor, Highland
Ind.; Thomas W. Witherspoon
Detroit; Jan'es R. Wolter, Ypsi
lanti; Donald M. Zanfagna
Providence, R.I.; Roger Zatkoff
Hamtramck.
Reserve awards went to: Fred N
Baer, Richard E. Balzhiser, William P
Barlow, James V. Bates, Donald H
Becker, Melvin J. Bernia, Glenn F
Bowers, Robert E. Brown, Frederick R,
Caffrey, Casimir A. Chomicz, Danie
J. Cline, John W. Conlin.
Donald D. Drake, Carl H. B. Dubac
George Dutter, Donald . Eaddy, Don-
ald K. Evans, Ronald H. Geyer, Ed
ward L. Hickey, Robert S. Hurley
Carl R. Kamhout, Harry Kates, Stan
ley P. Knickerbocker, Edward S. Kress
Carl J. Lowrey, Dean C. Ludwig
Charles E. Lutz, Wayne F. Melchior
Robert D. Milligan, Emil F. Morlock,
Roy G. Pella, Richard U. Rex, Charle
Ritter, Marquis L. Scarr, Donald
Scott, Joseph G. Shomsky.
Junior C. Stielstra, Eugene Rober
Topp, John D. Treadway, Raymond
VanderZeyde, John J. Veselenak,
James U. Wagner, Arthur Walke,
Ronald M. Williams, Arnold K. Wol
gast. ,
Freshmen awards went to: Harry
J. Athanson, James N. Bgwman, The
odore J. Cachey, Richard M. Chat
ters, Terry L. Cosgrove, Henry A.
Diulus, James D. Dutcher, William
R. Fidler, Richard H. Fisher, Per
Gagalis, Raymond T. Karsian.
James E. Kopp, Joseph W. Krahl
Lawrence C. Martin, Alfred F. Moss
George C. Muellich, Peter J. Paulus
Robert W. Sabo, Russel P. Swaney
Edmund B. Swanson, Bonner C. Up-
shaw, Robert W. Weber.

CHICAGO-()-New champion
Illinois grabbed six places and
powerful Wisconsin took five on
the 22-player All-Big Ten footbal
squad selected yesterday by con-
ference coaches.
It was the first time the AP's
honor team was split into offen-
sive and defensive units. Previous-
ly, the coaches named first and
second teams.
* * *
ONLY INDIANA failed to land a
man on the two platoons. Michi-
gan and Ohio State placed three
apiece; Minnesota had two hon-
ored and second-place Purdue
Iowa and Northwestern one each
End Lowell Perry and tackle
Tom Johnson of the Wolverines
gained berths on the offensive
unit, while linebacker Roger
Zatkoff was named on the de-
fensive squad.
The Rose Bowl-headed Illini
took four offensive berths, while
four of Wisconsin's spots were on
the defensive team.
Two players, Perry and halfback
Johnny Karras of Illinois, were
unanimous choices. Both were of-
fensive stars.
* * *
THREE missed only one vote, in-
cluding the sole repeater from
1950, halfback Vic Janowicz of
Ohio State; fullback Bill Reichardt

of
ba
l
d
sc
qu
co
Sol
sot
po-
Pu

e Laurels Second,
Iowa, and ace Illinois line- Il 1m Fourth
cker, Chuck Boerio.
Another clear-cut favorite was
Ohio State's Fred Bruney, a fine NEW YORK - (') -- Powerful
efensive halfback, who got Tennessee rolled up the largest
even out of nine possible votes. vote of the season yesterday in
The offensive backfield included strengthening its hold on the No.
arterback John Coatte of Wis- 1 position in the Associated Press
nsin, Karras and sensational football poll.
phomore Paul Giel of Minne- The Volunteers were so impres-
ta at halfbacks; and Iowa's 205- sive in smashing Kentucky, 28-0,
und Reichardt at fullback Saturday that they received first
The lone player from runner-up place on 92 of the 168 ballots cast
urdue was defensive end Leo by sports writers and broadcasters

PRO GRID ROUNDUP:
Lions Gain Undisputed
National Division Lead

COVERS SCUFF MARKS!
GIVES SHOES RICHER COLOR!
;&VOLBlack, Tan, Brown, Blue, Dark Tan,
., + ~.Mid-Tan, Oxblood,
Ask ar~q GL a~pt, Mahogany, and Neutrc
4 KI SHOE
(KEN-WiE)

- M' HOOP HISTORY:
Mitchell Ele,
,Sport to Big
- I
. ti
., (First of a series spotlighting Michi-
1. gan basketball since 1917)
F.
t. By DICK LEWIS
l The approaching basketball
campaign marks the 35th year of
- competition for Michigan hard-
- wood warriors, and the current
, five is looking to chalk up court
- victory number 400 since the
sport's local conception in 1917.
i, Thirty-four years of ivaize and
Blue basketball have produced 386
s wins and 255 losses, goodafor six
Big Ten championships and an
t overall percentage of .602.
d * * *
IT ALL BEGAN in the year prior
i_ to the conclusion of World War
One when Coach Elmer Mitchell
, gathered together a band of nine
- athletes, and elevated the hoop
sport from the intramural level to
n active Big Ten participation.
i
Michigan captured its initial
, contest by defeating Camp Cus-
ter in the season's opener, 44-28.
" After dropping their next game
- to Case, the Wolverines came
through with three victories in

Sugar. The honor teams
OFFENSIVE
ENDS-Lowell Perry, Michigan, and
Rex Smith, Illinois.
TACKLES-Tom Johnson, Michigan,
and Charles Ulrich, Illinois.
GUARDS-Don MacRae, Northwest-
ern, and Charles Studley, Illinois.
CENTER-Wayne Robinson, Minne-
sota.
QUARTERBACK-John Coatta, Wis-
consin.
1 HALFBACKS-Paul Giel, Minnesota,
and Johnny Karras, Illinois.
FULLBACK-Bill Reichardt, Iowa.
DEFENSIVE
ENDS-Pat O'Donohue, Wisconsin,
and Leo Sugar, Purdue.
TACKLES-Dick Logan, Ohio State
and Jerry Smith, Wisconsin.
GUARDS-Deral Teteak, Wisconsin,
and Bob Kennedy, Wisconsin.
LINEBACKERS - Charles Boerio,
Illinois, and Roger Zatkoff, Michigan.
F BACKS-Vic Janowicz, Ohio State,
Al Brosky, Illinois, and Fred Bruney,
Ohio State.
vated Court
T. T
Ten Level
a row. That trio of wins provided
just about the only consolationj
in a six win, twelve loss year. '
Mitchell's five failed to earn a
single Western Conference tri-
umph, losing ten in a row to their
more experienced opponents. The
green hoopsters garnered an astro-I
nomical 42-8 score over Kalama-
zoo, but bowed to Minnesota 49-10,
were trounced by OSU 39-7, and
tallied only six markers in a loss
to Chicago.
FORWARD Jim McClintock
wound up the high scorer for the
year, while Tim Hewlitt and John
Emery proved the most effective
against conference teams. The
squad hurt in mid-season by the

across the nation.I
MICHIGAN STATE won con-
vincingly over Colorado, 45-7, buty
just managed to protect its No. 2
position from fast-rising Mary-
land, which closed a perfect nine-
game season with a 54-7 rout of
West Virginia.
The Terrapins, who meet
Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl
Jan. 1, moved into third place,
replacing Stanford, which
plunged to eighth as the re-
sult of a 20-7 loss to California.
Other main changes in the
semi-final rankings of college
teams saw Illinois, Stanford's foe
in the Rose Bowl, climb from sixth
to fourth and Kentucky plummet
from ninth to 17th.
THE WILDCATS' place in the
select top ten was taken by re-
surgent Oklahoma, which made
Nebraska its sixth straight victim,
27-0. The Sooners moved into
tenth place, shoving Baylor up a
notch.j
Thle 'Top TIen. wvith first place votes
and season; records in parentheses:
Points
1. Tennessee (92) (9-0).........1,5108
2. Michigan State (34) (9-0) .... 1,379
3. Maryland (18) (9-0).........1,257
4. Illinois (4) (8-0-1 )............1,030
5. Princeton (1) (9-0) ...........876
6. Georgia Tech (1) (9-0-1) ......727
7. Wisconsin (5) ("-1-1)5.........29
8. Stanford (1) (9-1)............ 463
9. Baylor (7-1-1)................406
10. Oklahoma (2) (7-?)...........206
The Second TPen:
11. Texas Christian (5-4).........144 j
12. California (3) (8-2)..........142
3. Virginia (1) (8-11)......... 96
14. San Francisco (3) (9-0) ...... 89
15. UCLA (5-3-1)................. 87
16. Texas (-2)................. e5
17. Kentucky (7-4)............... 73
18. Washington state (7-3)....... 47
s19. Holy Cross (8-1) _.......... 32
20. Southern California (7-3) ... 30
Others receiving votes: Clemson,
Purdue, Bucknell, Xavier (Ohio),
Michigan, Cincinnati, Duke, William
& Mary, South Carolina, Louisiana
aState, Notre Dame, MYiami (Fla.),

ra)
{

i

The Detroit Lions took over un-
disputed possession of first place
Sunday in the National Division
of the National Football League
thanks to a surprising Washington
victory over Los Angeles, 31-21,
and a bruising Cleveland defeat of
the Chicago Bears, 42-21.
The Lions, who crushed Green
Bay Thanksgiving Day, 52-35,
slipped into the lead with a 6-2-1
record. The Rams and Bears are
deadlocked for second place with
6-3 marks.
* * *
IN OTHER GAMES, the New
York Giants kept pace with the
league leading Browns in the
American loop by downing the
Chicago Cards, 10-0; Pittsburgh
All 1951 football 'M' winners
please report to Rentschler's
Studio, 319 East Hluron Street, ]
at 12 noon today for the officialI
squad picture.
-Bennie G. Oosterbaan

Det
Los
Chi
Sar
Gret

NFL Standings
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
W L T .Pct. PF
roit 6 2 1 .750 285
Angeles 6 3 0 .667 286
cago Bears 6 3 0 .667 210
nFrancisco 4 4 1 .503 183
en Bay 31 6 0 .333 193

196
206
195
159
271

against five setbacks. In the
game, which proved to be the
upset of the day, the Redskins
built up a 21-7 halftime lead
on Goode's two touchdowns and
a 24-yard pass from Baugh to
Hugh Taylor.
In the third period the victors
extended their lead to 31-10 as
Baugh flipped a 10-yard pass to
Bill Dudley for another TD; then
the ex-Lion booted a 23-yard field
goal.
A 81-yard touchdown run by
Bosh Pritchard and an 18-yard
field goal by Ray Poole gave the
New York Giants a 10-0 triumph
over the Windy City Cardinals.
The victory maintained the
Giants' scant hope of overtaking
the champion Browns.
* * *

out-lasted hard-pressed Philadel-
phia, 17-13, and the New York<
Yankees came from behind to tie
San Francisco. 10-10.
Earlier in the week the cham-
pionship-minded Lions showed
their offensive power by trounc-
ing the pass crazy Packers, 52-
35. But the week's most pleasant
surprise for Detroit came three
days later when the Redskins
and Browns won key games from
the Rams and Bears, respective-
ly, aiding the Lion's cause.
William (Dub) Jones, previous-
ly under-rated Brown halfbaclk
crossed the Bear goal line six
times and Lou "The Toe" Groza
made six conversions to account
for all the victors' points in one of
the roughest contests ever played
in professional football.
THE SEQUENCE of scoring was
a 4-yard run, a 34-yard pass before
halftime, runs of 11 and 27 yards
in the third quarter, and a 42-yard
dash and a 44-yard pass in the
final stanza. All this was accom-
plished by one man, Jones, who
scored the last five times he had
his hands on the pigskin.
Bob Goode and Sammy Baugh
led the Washington Redskins to
their fourth league victory

t
f

New York
Yanks

0 7 2 .000 172 282

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
W L T Pet. Pr PA
Cleveland 8 1 0 .889 230 115
New York
Giants 6 2 1 .750 190 137
Washington 4 5 0 .444 132 224
Pittsburgh 3 5 1 .375 163 183
Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 183 196
Chicago Cards 2 7 0 .222 141 204
Ilairst ylling
to Please Vot
Today!!
- - -8 HAIRCUTTERS --
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

L.r

Read and Use Daily Classifieds
: It's Timie To Start Thinking of
CHRDISTMAS
with GIFTS from Staeh & Day
To help the shopper, ina:y ,we suggest
Neckwear Jewelry
Shirts Hosiery
Pajamas Pocketbooks
Sport Shirts Handkerchiefs
Robes Belts-Suspenders
Sweaters Warm Jackets
Scarfs k Raincoats
Gloves Overcoats
Hats Suits, Topcoats
ALL GIFTS APPROPRIATELY BOXED
This year, more than ever before, it is smart
to start your Christmas shopping early.
STORE HOURS DAILY 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
MONDAYS until Christmas 9 P.M.
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
"We Serve to Serve AgdIn.
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET

it.

,I

Y

All football reserve award
winners please report at once to
Yost Field House to be measur-
ed for sweaters.
--Henry Hatch
loss of captain Al Boyd and two'
other regulars, but they still man-
aged to rack un 381 points to their
opponents' 440.
Two of the brightest spots of
the 1917-18 schedule were two
wins over Michigan Agricultural
College, which was later re-
named Michigan State. TheI
Maize and Blue courtmen took
the cow college boys into camp
by scores of 17-13 and 31-25.
1918-19 saw Michigan set the
Midwestern court scene on fire for
the first six weeks of the season,
and there after fizzle out to .500
ball for the rest of the year.
In his two years as varsity coach.
Mitchell pulled Michigan out of
the doldrums of inter-class cage
action, and hoisted his charges to
a place of respect in the West. As
a basketball pioneer, Mitchell's 24-
18 won and lost record stands
with the best.

rV
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pap ooje -jize
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. .,_ ......... ... . ................ . .. ~.................... . . .
Camputs Interviews on Cigarette Tests
No. 28...
THE OVENBIRD
\}
fo Q
ast Grand Master of the Royal Order of
Gourmets and Raconteurs--our outspoken
friend knows how to find the proof of thef
pudding. Especially such a thing as cigarette
mildness! A "quick puff" and a "single sniff"
left him hungry for facts. Smokers everywhere
have tried the same tests and discovered the one
_re est of cigarette mildness!
It's the sentsible test . . . the 30-Day Camel
Mildness Test, which simply asks you to try
Camels as your steady smoke, on a day-after-day,x

sr
t

a $399

HONEYBUGS scalps high prices and scoops
high-fashion with the smartest little leather
slipper you ever snuggled into. Sparkling
washable mock beaded vamp makes you feel

::.;:v :.::: <r: ..

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