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November 27, 1951 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1951-11-27

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER ^i, 1951

PAGE TWO TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951

Korea

Saga

Approaches

End

ELEEIES

Regents OKI
Engineering
Curriculum
A new four-year curriculum in
materials engineering has been ap-
proved by the Board of Regents
for the University College of En-
gineering.
The materials engineering pro-
gram will combine in four years
related parts of the chemical and
metallurgical engineering pro-
grams to train students in mater-
ials engineering.
According to Assistant Dean W.
J. Emmons, the new program was
developed when engineers inter-
ested. in materials were forced to
earn bachelor's degrees in both
the chemical and metallurgical
programs.
Also approved by the Regents at
their November meeting was a
change in the name of the depart-
ment of mechanical engineering
to the "Department of Mechani-
cal and Industrial Engineering."
The change will undoubtedly
force a revision in engineering
course nomenclature, said Dean
Emnons:
The traditional nickname of "M.
E." will probably be changed to
"M.I.," he said.
A proposal for the institute of a
University Transport Insti-
tute through the engineering
school was not submitted to the
Regents this month. It will prob-
ably be reviewed for approval at
the December meeting.
SL To Sponsor
NSA Confab Here
Student Legislature will be host
to the year's first Michigan Region
National Student Association con-
ference on Saturday and Sunday.
Keynote speaker will be NSA
president William Dentzer. Dean
of Residence Halls Peter Ostafin
will greet the delegates on behalf
of the University.
Such questions as UMT, de-em-
phasis of intercollegiate athletics,
academic freedom and freshman
orientation will be studied during
the two-day conference.
[-Ends Tonight ---

Circus Tent, Restaurant Stopovers
On Lengthy Road to Korean Peace

By VIRGINIA VOSS
Four months of international
haggling in an ex-restaurant in
Kaesong and a circus tent in Pan-
munjom resulted yesterday in for-
mal settlement of the tangled Ko-
rean buffer-zone issue.
The outlook for eventual peace
is now brighter than ever before.
ASIDE FROM scheduling of an
agenda,the ten winded negotia-
tors have reached their first area
of substantial agreement.
Since July 8, the on-again,
off-again Korean peace talks
have been characterized by
deadlock and distrust-smooth-
ed over with a veneer of diplo-
matic optimism.
Deadlocks have arisen over
newspaper coverage, neutrality
zones and truce lines. Only one
area of final agreement has pre-
viously been reached-the truce
talks agenda.
* * *
HOWEVER, negotiations, des-
pite recent frustrations and delays,
had a decidedly dramatic begin-
ning. Over a UN feature broadcast,
"Price of Peace," on June 23, a
usually vituperous Jacob Malik is-
sued a conciliatory statement
which sent the world's hopes for
an end to the year-old Korean
war soaring.
"The Soviet people believe
that .... discussions should be
started between the belligerents
for a cease-fire and an armistice
providing for mutual withdraw-
al of forces from the 38th Paral-
lel," he declared.
While UN forces faced the di-
lemma of how to maintain contact
with the enemy and still avoid get-
ting killed, Supreme Allied Com-
mander, Gen. Matthew B. Ridg-
way radioed acceptance of Malik's
proposal to Peiping.
But few could help wondering,
"Are the Russians sincere?"
AMIDST A blend of studied un-
concern and sheer hope, the big
day arrived.
On July 8, a helicopter trans-
ported a five-man UN delegation
from a "peace camp" in Munsan
to the no-man's-land of Kaesong,
where the heralded preliminary
talks were to take place. Headed
by Vice-Admiral C. Turner Joy,
the delegation arrived only to find
the Kaesong "neutral zone"
swarming with armed Reds.
The second day of actual truce
conferences brought a fruitless

UN proposal that their irate
newsmen be admitted to the
truce site. The next day armed
Communists stopped a group of
20 correspondents at Panmun-
jom.
The UN, as a result, halted talks.
WHILE STILL in'the process of
drawing up the agend'a, peace ne-
gotiations again bogged down over
the Communist demand that "all
* * r~

2. Arrangement for supervision
of terms-of the armistice.
3. Exchange of prisoners of war.
4. Plan of troop withdrawal.
* * *
THE LONG-SNARLED problem
of where to set up a buffer zone
for a cease fire precipitated the
next deadlock.
The five-man Red delegation,
headed byGen. Nam Il of North
Korea, stuck by their previous pro-
posal for a neutral strip determin-
ed by the 38th Parallel. Refusing
to be forced into a 30-mile retreat,
the UN held out for a buffer zone
based on the then-existing battle
line.
Buffer zone disputes were
temporarily pushed aside on
Aug. 4 when Ridgway brusquely
suspended negotiations, charg-
ing Communist violations of the
neutrality guarantees.
The next Monday, the Commun-
ists almost apologized. They
agreed to Ridgway's conditions for
talk resumption.
Things looked a little more
hopeful.
But on Aug. 23, the Commun-
ists pointed an accusing finger at
the Allied air force, whose planes
they alledged had strafed the Kae-
song area.

Conference
T DiScuss
Methods of enforcing high stan-
dards in college sports will be'
thrashed over Saturday at a Chi-
cago Conference called by the
North Central Association of Col-
leges' Committee on Intercollegi-
ate Athletics.
Dean James B. Edmonson of
the education school, committee
chairman, said yesterday the
group will probably recommend
'strong action' to support codes'
of honor already formally recog-
nized by Midwestern colleges.
"MOST of the colleges want to
continue intercollegiate athletics
in tbrms of high standards," the
dean said. "In order to do this,
some effective methods of disci-
plining violators of rules must be
developed or offenders may drive"
intercollegiate sports out of many
institutions.
Dean Edmonson noted that
numerous "leaders of colleges
and high schools are alarmed'
over the extermely bad practices
of a few higher institutions
which have been highlighted in
the press in recent weeks."
A desire for "high ideals of
sportsmanship" has been contin-
ually expressed by college adminis-
trators and the conference intends
to create "means of enforcing their
wishes," he said.
Findings of the Committee,
which recently completed a six-
month study of the problem, will
form the basis of a report to the
NCAC's annual meeting scheduled
for next March.
Besides the four-man commit-
tee, seventy-five other educational
officials are expected to attend
Saturday's conference including
members of the National Collegi-
ate Athletic Association and se-
lected college presidents and high
school principals.
Skiers To Meet
Wednesday Night
The Ullr Ski Club will hold its
first meeting of the year at 7:30
p.m., Wednesday in Rm. 3G of the
Union.
A movie, "Focus on Skis" will be
shown. All old members and any
interested students are invited to
attend.
'Technic' Out Soon
The second fall issue of "The
Michigan Technic" will be on sale
tomorrow and Thursday in the
Engineering Arch and East Engi-
neering Building.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-17
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
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Figure 5 average words to a line. _
Classified deadline daily except 1
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST November 17th in or near VFW-
Brown leather billfold. Reward. Phone
2-2252, ask for Harry. )60L
FOR SALE
BOMBER JACKETS $9.95. Satin twill,
quilt lining, water repellent. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )3
TWO FORMALS-One white, one yellow.
Size 10, worne once. Call 5617 after 4
o'clock. )81
CHICKERING Grand Piano, antique bed
and sideboard, books, pingpong table,
girls bicycle, toys, misc .household
goods. 140 Underdown Rd., Barton
Hills, 2 to 8 p.m. Phone 6189. )83
1949 CROSLEY-Good condition. Will
finance at about $15 per month.
First payment in January, call 2-5628,
after 6 p.m. call Dexter 4558. )84
TYROL CANADIAN SKI BOOTS - Two
weeks use, inside lacing, size 9% to 10.
Phone 2-8877. )85
BABY PARAKEETS or budgies, canaries,
bird supplies and cages. Open 1 to 7
p.m. 562 S. Seventh St. Phone 5330.
STUDENTS! An organization that cov-
ers five states presents diamond rings
at prices designed for you. Let me
show you how to save up to 50% on
the BEST QUALITY STONES. Phone
2-1809 evenings. L. E. Anger. )15P
ROOMS FOR RENT
STUDENT to share apartment with
Grad, students. Modern kitchen, gas
heat, continuous hot water. Student
landlord. Call 3-1791 before 10:30 a.m.
27R
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. william St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
APARTMENT for men. Two rooms, fur-
nished, modern kitchen, utilities in-
cluded, $75.00. Call 2-9410 or 2-7108.
)12R
ATTRACTIVE ROOM-1605 S. University
$4 a week. Call 2-4231 after 5:30. )29R
FOR RENT
ROOMS & SUITES FOR MEN-For those
who'll appreciate congenial landlady.
On campus. Call before 4 p.m. 2-0542.
)11F
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m.
)1R
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens
Sales, rentals, and service. M rrill's,
314 S. State :,t. )3B

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
EXPERT TYPING. Reasonable rates. 329
S. Main. Phone 3-4133 or 29092 eve-
nings. )8B
TYPING (experienced) - Theses, term
papers, stencils. Phone 7590, 830 S.
Main. )6B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS-4 for
$1 while you wait. Snider Studio, 213
S. Main (opposite Woolworth's). )19B
APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS-4 for
$1 while you wait. Snider Studio, 213
S. Main (opposite Woolworth's.) )19B
TYPING-Neat, fast and accurate. Call
2-2507 days, 3-8054 nights. Ask for E.
Woodard. )20B
PERSONAL
JOIN THE Ulir Ski Club. First meeting
Wednesday, Nov. 28, 7:30, Room 3G
Union. Movie "Focus on Skifs" will
be shown. )22P

PERSONAL
MuOD)ERN Beauty Shop - Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ina-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00 Phone 8100 )13P
HELP WANTED
MUST BE EXPERIENCED - Women's
better apparel and ready-to-wear. Ex-
cellent conditions, top earnings, steady
or piat time. Hospitalization, paid
vacations. Reply Box 2, Mich. Daily
or phone S. Davis, Detroit, WA 8-9821.
)24H
YOUNG LADY WANTED to help during
Christmas rush. Part or full time
selling and stock work. Apply at Fol-
lett's Book Store, 322 South State
Street. 75H
GROUP WORKER - Some secretarial
ability, interesting work with student
group. Hillel Foundation. Ph. 3-4129.
)33H
MISCELLANEOUS
WOULD LIKE to borrow a car for local
use weekend of Dec. 7and 8. 201
Michigan Hse., W.Q. 2-4401. )11M

..
111

Read DailyClassifieds

GONE FISHINC
ean member of
cease-Mire negot
Panmunjom wl
time during on
by a "shady, wa
foreign troops be
Korea." The UN c
policy it has sin
UN force musti
until a genuine p
tablished."
An agenda wa
upon during the
sessions at the4
Issues schedule
were:
1. Settlement
between the two
Who Launders
Shirts Best?

"REDS CALL Off Korean Truce
Parleys," the New York Times
Sheadlined;and discouragement set
in again.
In spite of Ridgway's sharp re-
buttal that the alledged air at-
tacks were "obviously manufac-
tured," truce talks were suspended
until October 25.
In the mud-hut village of
G-A North Kor- Panmunjom, the Reds seemingly
the Communist yielded to UN insistence that the
tiating group at cease-fire line be drawn along the
hiles away the existing battle line.
e of the sessions The "agreement," however,
idy pool." included a few "necessary ad-
justments" - which the UN
withdrawn from couldn't accept.
ountered with the The truce talks during the first
ce reaffirmed: "A half of this month have been
remain in Korea marked by confusion,. growing
eace has been es- doubt and suspicion, and more
stalling over the buffer-zone dis-
cs finally agreed 'pa~te.
asninhadrteth Recent settlement of the truce
ninth and tenth line issue stems from the UN's
end of July. momentous Nov. 17 proposal to
d to be discussed compromise on a cease-fire line
and speed up negotiations on the
of a buffer zone remaining three points on the ne-
armies. glected agenda.
November of this year, like No-
KYER MODEL vember of last, has seen the Kor-
LAUNDRY ean situation brought to a signi-
ficant head. And again the ques-
tion foremost in the minds of the'
nation is the same as that batted
about in Korean foxholes:
"Will there be a truce by Christ-
mas?"

OPENS TOMORROW
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
Ares-vnfs
""King R ichard II1
by William Shakespeare
Wed. through Sat. - Nov. 28 to Dec. 1
8:O00P.MJ.
a
WED. FOR
*Student Rate WED FO
P O"e{!Rt THUD NYRS. SEAT
Regular admissions $l.20-90c--60c
Box office open 10-5 Daily
LYDIA MENDELSSOIIN I-IEATRE

°4

"MEET ME AFTER
THE SHOW" WI
and
"TEPEOPLEf
AGAINSTEO'HARA
NOW SHOWING

SALVATORE BACCALONI

TVF . rra IQ u ay4 w
:N'..
""OONAUP

MUSICAL
WONDER
v 'SHOW!

4

-

PLUS
ALEXANDRE DUMAS' "'
Mat. 'til 5, 30c; Nights, 44c

and 'introducing
Leslie CARON
-Also -
TOM & JERRY
in "NITWITTY KITTY"
Prices for this Engagement Only
Matinees 55c, Nights 80c

; /- t9

i
v
"Sine ths cod snp af my ale
_ oWshosar c cbs
155

BASSO BUFFO of the
METROPOLITAN OPERA
CHORAL UNION SERIES
THURSDAY, 8:30, NOV. 29
in HILL AUDITORIUM
ARIAS FROM
FAVORITE OPERAS
Tickets, tax exempt, $2.50--$2.00-$1.50
AT BURTON TOWER

U

. . ®

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

You save 10; by buying your
MICHIGANENSIAN
now!

11

11

,.,

THE HIAWATHA CLUB at the University
joins with
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP

I

r

it

CONTINUOUS FROM 1 P.M.
N-0-W! "

to

Invite You

44c to
5 P.M.

7:30 TO 9:00 DAILY
7:30 TO 5:30 SAT.

- TODAY AND WEDNESDAY

i
i

Price rises December 21st
Student Publications Building

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

toon
INFORMAL AUTOGRAPH PARTY AND "KAFFEE KLATCH"
THIS WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON-NOV. 28
(just drop in anytime between 1 and 5 P.M.)
honoring
LEWIS C. REIMANN
author of:
BETWEEN THE IRON AND THE PINE
a salty and vivid collection of folklore and folktale based on the author's
boyhood and youth on the Upper Peninsula frontier when timber and iron
nmrniAAd the I I P with the sme kind of rnlor anA drnma nC: the more

I.
4

I 1W UV~IE L~ ~Frim BI* ~NU'Jl

'r

I V T7-2 L. M -i M i1 0

II

III

1111

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