100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


rTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1951 PAGE THREE

woommompwo

Wolverine

Jieven

E barks

for

Ithaca

Tonight

IM ROUND-UP:
Four Fraternities Fight
Fo OTIntramural L aurels

By DICK LEWIS
Yesterday's snow and rain,
which washed out a full slate of
intramural gridiron activity, did
little to clear up the blanket point
spread that exists in fraternity
championship competition.
Four fraternities are battling
for the overall lead. Thlese include
Delta Sigma Phi which has gar-
nered 282 points in three sports,
ATO whose total is 143 plus a
sure 130 and a possible 150 foot-
ball markers, Kappa Sigma with
196 and a possible 90 in football,
and Phi Delta Theta which has
tallied 255 points for the season.
* * *
DELTA SIGMA PHI, the de-
fending football kingpins, were
discouraged from a repeat of last
year by a 27-0 loss in the first
place playoffs. Kappa Sigma,
now in the quarter finals of the
third place playoffs, took both
track and cross country laurels.
ATO was also involved in the tri-
ple tie for track honors.
Current football action is en-
tering the semi-final round of
the first place playoffs. Phi
Gamma Delta, ATO, Sigma Phi
Epsilon and Sigma Phi have all
reached the quarter finals and
a minimum of 130 points.
The Phi Gams, 14-0 victors over
Psi Upsilon, are scheduled to meet
ATO, which scored a 19-7 win over
Phi Delta Theta and mauled Tri-
angle 51-0. Last Tuesday, these
teams played to a scoreless tie.
* * *
THE OTHER semi-final action
will pit Sigma Phi Epsilon which
conquered Delta Sigma Phi 27-0
and Pi Lambda Phi 20-12, against
Sigma Chi, 32-13 winner over Phi
Kappa Psi.
Fraternity volleyball, divided
into ten 4-team divisions, is in
its second week of play. Phi
Delta Theta and Pi Lambda Phi
both boast unblemished records
of 12-0. Going into last night's
action, ATO and Theta XI had
6-0 slates.
Other contenders are featured

by Chi Phi (10-2), Chi Psi (10-2)
and Beta Theta Pi (9-3).
First place playoffs in profes-
sional fraternity football were
scheduled for today, but probably
will be postponed until weather
permits.
* ~* *
THE OPENING round features
competition among four undefeat-
ed clubs. Psi Omega (4-0) meets
Delta Sigma Delta (4-0), while
Alpha Kappa Kappa (4-0) faces
the Law Club 'A' team (4-0).
Professional fraternity volley-
ball, in its second week of play,
shows five undefeated teams.
Alpha Kappa Kappa, Tau Epsi-
lon Rho, Delta Sigma Delta,
Alpha Kappa Psi, and the Air
Force, all with 6-0 records, are
the five.
Residence Hall football warfare
has reached the final round in the
first place playoffs. Huber, which
chalked up a 13-0 score over.Wen-
ley, next week will meet Hayden,
12-0 victor over Winchell, for the
crown.
** *
VOLLEY BALL activity in the
dorm league finds Adams (12-0),
Allen-Rumsey (11-1), and Chica-
go (9-3) at the head of their divi-
sions. Wenley and Prescott have
identical 8-4 records for a flat-
footed tie in the fourth division.
Independent title play is also
keen, with the Newman Club
holding a slim 185-167 lead over
the Forecasters. The two lead-
ers divided the first two sports
of the season, the Foresters ca-
turing the track bunting and the
Newman Club cross country
honors.
The independent football cham-
pionship wil be decided among the
Foresters, Newman Club and Wes-
leyan, while volleyball, in its initial
week, is headed by the Actuaries
with a 5-1 slate.
A 16-team faculty volleyball
league begins November 15, and
a faculty elimination bowling
tourney is scheduled to com-
mence on November 23.
TOM FABIAN earned a mara-
thon 1-6, 17-15, 6-4 triumph over
Jay Millman to move into the fi-
nals, while Tom Drenton a 3-6,
6-3, 6-4 winner over Jerry Rovner,
and Bob Russel, who won a 6-2,
6-4 match from Don Shreffer, will
contest for the other final berth.

'li Sharpens
Secondary
For Big Red
By HERB NEIl4
The Wolverines entrain for
Ithaca tonight after sharpening up
their pass defense in a stiff scrim-
mage yesterday afternoon at Ferry
Field amid continuous snow flur-
ries.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan will
run his squad through a short
practice this afternoon before the
team leaves for the East at 9:33.
* * *
EXPECTING to see the aerial
attack of Cornell's Rocco Calvo
rain, shine, or snow Saturday the
Wolverines put in their second
straight day of concentrating on
breaking up passes in the snow.
Lowell Perry, who is suffer-
ing from an ankle injury, was
in uniform yesterday but did
not engage in any of the drills.
He trotted around the field, but
it was evident that the ankle
bothered the star end.
Oosterbaan employed a number1
of men in the secondary in yester-
day's defensive drills.1
* * * *
AT THE HALFBACK posts he
used the regular defensive backs,,
Dave Tinkham and Don Oldham,
as well as Tom Witherspoon, Russ
Rescorla, and Don Zanfagna.
Witherspoon looked especially
good in covering opposing pass re-
ceivers.
Bill Putich and Oldham both
worked in the safety slot. Old-
ham may see considerable action
at this position Saturday in
place of Perry.
The line backers, Roger Zatkoff,
Ted Topor, Larry LeClaire, and
Gene Knutson, did their usual fine
job in halting the reserves before
the latter could pick up yardage.
End Russ Osterman and tackle
Jim Balog got through to stop thet
reserves for a number of losses. 3
* * *
IN THE offensive drills which

ROCCO CALVO
. threatens 'M' defense
* *
followed the defensive concentra-
tion the second and third string
backfields got a chance to show
their attacking power. Most of
this portion of yesterday's prac-
tice was devoted to the running
game.
Don Eaddy at the tailback
post, fullback LeClaire, and
right halfback Witherspoon got
away several long runs against
the reserves. LeClaire and Res-
corla, who also worked at the
fullback post, were effective in
pushing through the middle of
the line, while the halfbacks
skirted end for the most part.
A few passes were thrown by
the varsity during the scrimmage
with Topor, Captain Bill Putich,
Eaddy, and Duncan McDonald do-
ing the majority of the throwing.
* *
END Fred Pickard made several
fine catches in the snow which in-
dicates that he may be able to take
up some of the slack in the pass re-
ceiving department which will re-
sult if Perry is sidelined.

Old Rivalry'
A t Cornell 1
By IVAN KAYEt
Michigan and Cornell, a couplex
of old-timers in the inter-collegi-
ate football world, will face each.
other on the gridiron of Schoell-
kopf Field on Saturday for the
first time in eighteen years.
It was seventy-eight years ago<
that thirty Michigan students first
issued a challenge by mail to Cor-
nell University for a football con-_
test to be staged in the neutral
city of Cleveland.
* * *
THE LETTER was received by
Andrew White, who three years
earlier had gone from the Ann Ar-
bor campus to assume the first
presidency of Ezra Cornell's new
university. White wrote a reply
which became a football classic
when he said, "I will not permit
thirty men to travel four hundred
miles merely to agitate a bag of
wind.''
It took sixteen years for the
Cornell president to mellow his1
attitude, and finally in 1889
Michigan and the Big Red met
on the field of friendly strife.
The boys from the West, new to
the game of football, absorbed a
66-0 beating from the Ivy
League school. This defeat in-
cidentally, still stands as the
worst ever inflicted on a Michi-
gan team.
The two schools met eight times
back in the "Stone Age" of foot-
ball and the Ithacans won the first
seven. In the twentieth century
however, the Wolverines have been
SPORTS
HERB COHEN: Night Editor

Dick Wakefield, Peck's bad boy
of baseball, was given another
chance yesterday.
The Cleveland Indians announc-
ed that the former Michigan ath-
lete would be granted a spring
training tryout. Wakefield, who
makes his home in Ann Arbor,
seemed anxious to return to the
diamond wars, when interviewed.
HE OPINED that he's "gotta
make a living" and seemed set on
doing so next February in Tucson.
When Wakefield starts to swing
his potential big stick in the In-
dian training camp, it will be the
first time he has held the lumber
since early last spring.
Instrumental in Wakefield's
renaissance was Hank Green-
berg, general manager of the In-
dians. Greenberg, who wore the
same uniform with Wakefield at
Detroit, said that Dick "has so
much potential as # hitter that
I'm going to give him what prob-
ably will be his last chance."
The former Michigan home-run
king knew as early as last year
that he would get a chance with
the Cleveland nine. But Tribe
manager Al Lopez balked at sign-
ing the Tiger "bonus baby" late
in the 1951 pennant chase, be-
cause he was dubious about the
outfielder's condition.
IN THE PAST week, Wakefield
has been working out at the intra-
mural building in a preliminary
-M Scores
VOLLEYBALL
Itawalians 6, 1AS Arrows 0
IA E Pi 4, Acacia 2
Foresters 6, Nelson House 0
Phi Sigma Kappa 6, Tau Kappa Ep-
silon 0
Phi Sigma Delta 3, Lambda Chi
Alpha 3
Theta Xi 4, 'theta Delta Chi 2
rATO 3, Sigma Phi 3
Phi Alpha Kappa 4, Psi Omega 2
IDelta Tau Delta 6, Triangle 0
Phi Kappa Tai 5, Zeta Psi 1
SPhi Gamma Delta 6, Kappa Num 0
Sigma Phi Epsilon 6, Alpha Phi
Alpha 0
Theta Chi 6, Sigma Ni t0

when he
Western

ship. Wakefield slugged .368, and
set Big Ten records for the most
total bases (42), most home runs
(5), and most runs batted in (25).
SOON AFTER, he was signed
by Detroit for a $52,000 bonus, and
he lived up to his rave notices by
clubbing .316 in 1943 and a phe-
nomenal .355 in 1944. The follow-
ing year, Wakefield entered the
armed forces, and was never the
same thereafter.
Wakefield never returned to
his pre-war form when he came
back to the Tigers, and conse-
quently spent a few seasons
gathering splinters on the bench.
Detroit sold him to the New York
Yankees at the conclusion of the
1949 campaign.
The flamboyant fielder held out
during the spring of 1950 however,
and the Yankees promptly sold
him to the Chicago White Sox.
RAMBUNCTIOUS Richard
promptly balked at reporting,
whereupon the Yankees optioned
him to the Oakland Oaks of the
Class Triple - A Pacific Coast
League. Wakefield failed to make
the grade with the West Coast en-
try.
In a probationary period last
year, Wakefield tried to prove him-
self for the Oaks as a dollar-a-year
man, but was again released.
LATE HOCKEY SCORES
Detroit 4, New York 4 (Tie)
Toronto 1, Chicago 0

'M' Renews Wakefield To Get Tryout with Cleveland

_________ * * * _________

led the Wolverines to the
Conference champion-

DICK WAKEFIELD
. .. one more chance
* * *
attempt to return to his old form.
He has not been working during
I the off-season.
When Greenberg made the
announcement, Wakefield was
shopping for a new automobile.
His 1951 hard-top convertible
was stolen Tuesday by several
teenagers, and demolished in a
wreck on icy roads.I
Baseball's problem child first
came into prominence in 1941

BIG TEN NEWS:
Badgers Top Statistics
IU Replacement Pending

j
i
t
it
E
i ,
1
1

far more successful, winning four
of the eight games played and
outscoring the foe 159-98. The last
two meetings, 1917 and 1933, end-
ed in 42-0 and 40-0 victories for
Michigan.
* * *
CORNELL holds an 11-5 edge on
the Wolverines due mainly to the
games played in the last century,
when Michigan was just beginning
to experiment with the new game.!
The Big Red thus stands as the
only team other than Army to
hold a series edge on the Maize
and Blue.

PART TIME SALESMAN
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
* Apply in person or by letter
* Please do not telephone
State hours available
Open 'til 6 P.M.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washing ton
Makes a Man Love a Pipe
and a Woman Lovea Man

R EAD and USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

Rabideau-llarris

U

f
:-

bets you a new shirt
that the airplane

cloth collar outlives
the shirt

'".
?

. a

I ,

. fd l

I

dCHAS SIA%
..6.K omh
To-morrow,
hundreds of
cold faced
alarm clocks
will send us
hundreds of
customers.
An hour after they ring
... our cash register will
start.
75c OUT OF $1. for warm
woolen hose.
$2.50 OUT OF $5. for
cozier underwear.

? By T1he Associated Pres
CHICAGO-Wisconsin, nestling
in third placein Western Confer-
ence football standings, dominates
the loop's statistical field.
Official compilations released
today show that coach Ivy Wil-
liamson's Badgers have main-
tained their leadership in both
team offensive and defensive play.
They lead the nation and the con-
ference on defense, limiting their
opposition to an average of 136.2
yards per game.
UNDEFEATED Illinois is run-
ner-up in the defense department
with a 230.3 yards per game, but
ranks seventh in total offense.
Minnesota shares second place in
offense with Iowa.
Wisconsin's offense was
slowed only slightly on a snow-
packed field last week against
Indiana. The Badger offensive
average dropped only 10 yards
to 367.8 yards a game.
Wisconsin made all 10 of the
points that have been scored
against Illinois, the leader, in
three conference games this year.
Statistically, this means the Illini
opponents have averaged 3.3
points a game, and gives Illinois
the best defensive record where it
counts, at the goal line.
* *

has been completing almost half,
11.8.C
Minnesota and Iowa, the run-I
nersup offensively, have been
averaging 322.3 and 322.5 yards
per game, respectively.
* * *
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Don
Veller of Florida State, Chuck
Benett of LaGrange, Ill., high
school and Earl (Greasy) Neale,
former Philadelphia Eagles Pro
Coach, figured last night in specu-
lation over who will replace Clyde
Smith as Indiana University foot-
ball coach.
* * *
SMITH QUIT with two years to
go on his contract - the tenth
Indiana coach who railed to pro-
Smith resigned Tuesday in the
wake of criticism from alumni and
students. Officially, the university
apparently has made no definite
move toward hiring a successor.
duce a winning record during his
tenure. Criticism of Smith began
several weeks ago when Notre
Dame and Michigan walloped the
Hoosiers. .

See Herb trying to sew a label on an Arrow shirt.
Arrow Darts, Pars, and Dovers at

ST'ATE
ST{FFT

ARROW'S
HERB SHRINER
Show Tonight 9 P.M.
WXYZ-Tv

wtz nerl
,-*w MINCE

A

A BIY
J.I BEI{T'Y

4&
)
..
4 t !

_ .
, 2b',5, ?? td
: ?c"... .
,, ; r .
;.? ..;
r

h i r rir~ rr ~ rr r r~r rr~ w q

A Iidu'o

gjc ics liIy ()

,Yes, we're betting our shirt -
if the collar of your Wings
Rocket frays before the body
shows signs of wear, you get
a brand new shirt free! Not
only the longest-wearing, but
the smartest shirt you'll see at
only $3.50. Made of gleaming
white, full combed high count
broadcloth-precision tailored
and smooth as a 3-point land-
ing. Come in and pick up a
few in your favorite collair
styles today.
$350

OUR COLLEGI
are styled t

THE BADGER opponents have 1
averaged 5.4 points a game. 9 Barbers -
Northwestern leads the con-
ference in passes attempted, 28 The Dascola
per game, but has completed
only 9.7 per game. Wisconsin, Near Michiga
averaging 24.4 aerials a game,

ATE CUTS
o please!
No Waiting
Barbers
n Theatre

t lcseup hero
f,

The Thoroughbred of Pipe Tobaccos
Choice white Burley . Smooth and mild

... .

1 I

$7.50 OUT OF $10. for a
sweater to wear at the
office.
And it won't be over fif-
teen minutes until those
two young men looking at
Smithson's coats will be
pulling out check books
and asking for fountain
pens. Everything for a
cold day whether it's in
November or August.
CMITHSON*1

I

I 1
t
MI
I I
3
I
I

IN SEASON
SALE
OF

f . sy
o S
jjf1 v,,.
RF" ;,r 2

Men's Slacks
(Thurs., Fri. & Sat. only)
20 off
Q Q Qi

. '
,
t g
ti ,.
,F c
x l+
:: .,
,
.a
.z
-.
a
. --. .
\t
}'
r. .'.ti ::

Entire stock of Fall and
Winter Slacks
Choose any pair from our
stock of fine Gabardines,
Coverts, Flannels, Shark-
e1 inc nnr3 Prmfnrl - rr-A

-ot
-
'-_

Ii fLn , A o51

III

ii

m ilioi li.2::

I [ - .

-- :

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan