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November 08, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-11-08

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1951

THE MICHIGEAN fDAILY

."IPAVdU . rviA

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' AA~d A Y " J A A. .111E J.133... 33.A 1'x. c

ON THE AIR:
Workshop Trains 'U' Actors

Civic Group To Welcome
AT T T --""_.

LEn

, * * *

By MARILYN FLORIDIS
"Let's try that fade-out again."
These are familiar words
around WHRV,. home of the Uni-
versity Speech Department Radio,
as students go through rehearsals
for the regular Radio Workshop
Drama, heard at 4:30 p.m. on
Thursdays.
The phrase is just one of the
terms with which students in radio
acqaint themselves and adopt for
their own as they learn the inside
know-how of putting on a drama.
The opportunity of first hand ex-
perience is offered them through
this Radio Drama Workshop Se-
ries.
GIVING the student full sway in
the running of the show, Radio
Workshop Drama acts as a train-
ing ground.
Trying to use as many original
University student scripts as
possible, Radio Workshop Dra-
ma further makes use of student
talent by using them as actors,
sound effects men, and directors.
Students act as their own critics
throughout rehearsal, trying to
give the professional touch to
their performance. They not only
work for perfection in their own
work, but make helpful sugges-
tions to co-workers in this learn-
Ing experiment.
Directing a Radio Workshop
Drama is considered one of the
highest honors given a student di-
rector, as this program's top level
of attainment puts it high on the
ladder of productions at WHRV.
* * *
THE SCRIPT for this week's
Radio Workshop Drama produc- I

INew Voters a
Ann Arbor's fledgling voters will
be honored at a unique "birthday
party" next week, it was announc-
ed yesterday.
In an attempt to bolster the
election totals in the 21-year-old
column, the local unit of the
League of Women Voters, a non-
partisan civic organization, is
sponsoring the party next Tues-
day.
ON HAND to welcome the new
flock will be Democratic Gov. G.
Mennen Williams and Republican
Truman Asks
International
Disarmament
(Continued from Page 1)

r,

t Party
State Auditor John B. Martin, Jr.
Representing their respective par-
ties, the state officials will greet
the guests on an informal basis.
City Clerk Fred J. Looker will
register Ann Arbor residents as
voters and provide outsiders
with registration information.
He will also demonstrate a vot-
ing machine.
The purpose of the party is to
make young adults conscious of
the importance of voting, accord-
ing to Mrs. Charles L. Stevenson,
League chairman. League officials
hope to make the party an annual
event, she said.
Some 400 invitations have been
sent out to groups in the Univer-
sity and the city but all persons
who mark their 21st birthdays in
1951 are invited, Mrs. Stevenson
said.
Birthday cake and coffee will be
served at the hour-long affair
which will take place at 8 p.m.
Tuesday in the Ethel Hussey Room
of the Michigan League.
Two Youths
Give Confused
Testimonies
(Continued from Page 1)
IN HIS OPENING statement be-
fore putting Morey on the stand,
defense attorney Ralph C. Keyes
of Ann Arbor said, "This is not
murder in the first degree." He
maintained the youths could not
account for their actions because
of the beer they consumed.
"Voluntary drunkenness is no
excuse for commission of a

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST SATURDAY-Wallet belonging to
R. Saran. Call Virginia Saran, 3024
Stockwell, 3-1561. )42L
FOR SALE
HEADQUARTERS for Levis - Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington St. Open 'til
6 p.m. )3
DRESSES, FORMALS-Sizes 10-12, ex-
cellent condition. Ph. 3-0675 after 5:30.
)52
BUSINESS GIRL wants to sell dresses,
formal, sizes 10 to 12. Call 3-0675
after 5:30. )52
BABY PARAKEETS and canaries; young
male dog, half German Short hair
pointer. 562 S. Seventh St. 4
RALEIGH BIKE-Great condition. Not
too cheap. 521 E. Jefferson. Ph. 2-9464,
Sam Pasiencier. )63
DOUBLE-BREASTED TUX-Size 36-37.
Phone 3-8863. )64
FOR SALE-1946 Triumph motorcycle,
500 cc. twin. Completely rebuilt. Norm
124 Green House, E.Q., 2-4591. )65
DON'T BE caught giftless for Xmas, go
to Burr-Pats now, 1209 S. "U". )5
BARGAIN-High Fidelity Record Player,
also portable radio. Ph. 3-0521 Ext. 444.
) 67

FOR SALE
OFFICIAL Michigan Ring-Use our lay-I
away plan, order now. Burr-Pats,
1209 S. "U". )5
1949 FORD tudor sedan, 58cylinders.
excellent condition. Undersell dealers.-
Call 2-8877. )28
FOR RENTl
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call after 5:30 p.m.
) IR
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
BUSINESS SERVICES
KIDDIE KARE
RELIABLE SITTERS available. Phone
3-1121. )2B
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. Mwrrill's,
314 S. State Lt. )3B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately.-Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5SB
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
EXPERT TYPING. Reasonable rates. 329
S. Main. Phone 3-4133 or 29092 eve-
nings. ) 8B
TYPING-Reasonable rates. Ph. 3-4040.
)16B
PERSONAL
MODERN Beauty Shop - Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P
THE BEST in Diamond Engagement
and Wedding Rings at wholesale
prices. Ph. 2-1809 evenings. L.)E.
Anger. ) 15P

PERSONAL
LITTLE LAWYERS in the snow,
You know where you can got
Can you be afraid to show.
For fear of snow bails we will throw?
M. C.
MISCELLANEOUS
FORGET OUR NUMBER? Of course,
we're in the telephone book-and in
the yellow section under "Subscrip-
tion Agencies." Student Periodical
Agency. )2M
WE HANDLE subscriptions to all per-
iodicals for all University personnel.
To order or to obtain rates, Ph. 2-8242,
Student Periodical. )2M
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED DESPERATELY-Two or four
tickets to Cornell game. 318 Hins-
dale House, E. Quad. )3X
TRANSPORTATION
KNOW OF ANY PARTY driving to Ann
Arbor from N.Y.C. for Thanksgiving
weekend who would take a passenger?
(Share expenses). Call Joan Mintzer,
2-2591. )8T
HELP WANTED
MUST BE EXPERIENCED - Women's
better apparel and ready-to-wear. Ex-
cellent conditions, top earnings, steady
or part time. Hospitalization, paid
vacations. Reply Box 2. Mich. Drly
or phone S. Davis, Detroit, WA 8-9821.
)24H
SALESMAN-Experienced preferred, part
time for clothing, shoes. Apply in
person or by letter. Give hours. Do
not phone. Good pay. Open till 6 p.m.
Sam's Store. 122 E. Washington. )23H
ROOM AND BOARD
YOU GOT INDIGESTION? Why not
eat right. Give 'er a go at 1617
Washtenaw, Tel. 5806. $1.55 day for
lunch and supper. "SECONDS TOO."

-Daily-L. Wilk
YOU'RE ON-Throwing a cue to actors Jim Miller, '53, and Ron
Bornstien, '54, is director Dick Reed, '52, from the control room
as he rehearses this week's Radio Workshop Drama "Rob Roy."
The show is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. today.

* * *
tion, which will be heard at 4:30
p.m. today, on WHRV and WUOM,
is entitled "Rob Roy." Written by
student Anne Grainger, the show
will be directed by Dick Reed, '52.
A particular challenging feature

Fear of Communism Threat
To School System-Edmonson

C

* *' *
of today's script is the fact that
the two students playing two
young boys in this production
must make the transition from a
child's voice to an adult male's
and back to a child's again within
the fifteen minute script.
But this problem is just one of
the many which is presented week-
ly in the student laboratory to de-
velop radio skills-Radio Work-
shop Drama.
Engin' School
Adds Option
A new degree program has been
announced by the engineering col-
lege.

abandon them and join in reason-
able settlements of world prob-
lems."
Until it does, he made it clear:
This buildup of the defenses of'
the free world is one way to se-
curity and peace. As things now
stand, it is the only way open to
us."
The President emphasized that
each stage ce his disarmament
plan would be entered upon only
after the previous one had been
completed.
"And each stage would be con-
tinuously policed by inspectors who
would report any breach of faith,"
he said.
He declared that "if the Soviet
Union and its satellites are really
afraid of the intentions of any of
the free countries, as they say
they are, here is a plan they can
adopt with safety."
HE SAID the American-Fiench-
British plan would give the Com-
munists "the same protection,
every step of the way, that it gives
every other country."
Mr. Truman said Gen. Dwight
D. Eisenhower, on his visit here
this week, gave him "an encour-
aging report of the progress that
is being made" under his com-
mand in Europe. But he said
serious difficulties still remain
and require "vigorous effort from

I

4 4c WEEKDAYS
to 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.

The fear of communism as a
threat to our system of free edu-
cation was pointed out by Dean
James B. Edmonson and Prof.
Stanley E. Dimond of the School
of Education yesterday.
Speaking at the opening session
of the annual Parent Education
Institute, Dean Edmonson called
for continued faith in America's
philosophy and system of free pub-
lic education which has been justi-
fied by the results achieved in the
past.
PUBLIC SCHOOLS are going
Cowan Cites
Banking Ills
Banks face problems in selling
their services, just like any other
business, contends Prof. Donald R.
G. Cowan, of the School of Busi-
ness Administration.
Moreover, since bankers sell in-
tangible service, their selling prob-
lems are among the most difficult
to solve, he reports in an article
appearing in the current issue of
Michigan Business Review, a bi-
monthly publication of the school.
Marketing research can be ap-
plied to the whole area of selling
bank services, and a scientific
analysis can increase markets, im-
prove efficiency and provide

through a trying period because
of the "criticism, doubt, and sus-
picion" surrounding them, the
dean asserted.
The conflict between ultra-
conservative and ultra-radicala
groups in our society will grow
more bitter, Dean Edmonson
predicted, "in which case the
schools will find it difficult to
escape the effects of the con-l
troversy."
Dean Edmonson said that pub-1
lic study and understanding are
needed rather than unreasoning
acceptance or criticism.
s* s 1
ALSO SPEAKING at the annualt
institute, Prof. Dimond emphasized
that there is danger that studentst
will not be able to make the in-
telligent decisions needed in a
democracy because they will not be
as we'll informed as they should
be.
"Teachers are becoming afraid
to permit discussion of current
events or controversial issues in
the classroom," he accused.
"Anotherof the difficulties of
teaching democracy is that so
many adults are not clear in their
own minds about what democracy
is," he pointed out.
"' * , -
PRES. HARLAN H. HATCHER
will address the delegates today.
Other speakers who will discuss
present problems of education are
Prof. Willard C. Olson, Director of
Research in Child Development in
the University Elementary School,
Prof. Garnet R. Garrison of the
speech department, and Betty L.
Kohler of he Department of Eng-
lish of Western Michigan College
of Education.
A general panel discussion will'
be lead by Principal Edith Roach
Snyder of Webster School, Pontiac
and Prof. Howard Y. McClusky of
the educational psychology depart-
ment.

A curriculum leading to the us and from our allies.
Bachelor of Science degree in In- As a result of Eisenhower's visit,
dustrial Engineering is now being he said, "arrangements are being
offered with two options, manage- made to speed up the training and
ment and production, according to equipment of the combined de-
Dean George Granger Brown of fense forces in Europe."
the College of Engineering. He reminded his international
The same in either option for audience:
the first two years, the program "Fighting is going on in Korea,
will give the student engineer a and the threat of Communist ag-
general education in many fields. gression hangs over many other
During the junior and senior years, parts of the world."
special courses will add economic * * *
and business courses to the regular IN THAT situation he said the
technical curriculum. United States and oher free coun-
The management program, with tries are arming because they must.
Prof. Charles B. Gordy as advisor,
will include courses in plant layout
and materials handling, motion Crar To Talk
and time study, wage incentives
and job evaluation, and produc-
tion controls. At Conference
Prof. Orlan W. Boston will di-
rect the production program which prof. Douglas Crary of the geo-
will include courses in fluid me- graphy department, will behone of
chanics, differential equations, the featured speakers at the twen-
thermodynamics, forming pro- ty-sixth annual conference of Mi-
cesses, structure Qf metals, design -it nna ofrec fM-
cstad gnchigan accountants to be held here
for production, jigs and features, Saturday.
production machines, and foundry -
work. Prof. Crary, who recently com-

crime," Keyes said. "However,
where intent is involved, a state
of intoxication should be con-
sidered in the degree of guilt."
The trial's sixth day was a big,
attraction for the hundreds of
spectators who crammed into the
packed court chamber in the an-
cient County Courthouse to see and
the defendants put under fire. CINEMA II D
Scores of onlookers arrived at 9
a.m., munched sandwiches during n
the noon hour and didn't budge
until the 5 p.m. adjournment. Arts
Pell is expected to be back on
the stand when the trial resumes
at 9 a.m. today.Union
Engin' School
E' hpresent with pride
Staff To MleetI
A change in department name SYMPUONIL
will be considered at 4:15 p.m. to-
day when the Engineering college
faculty meets in Room 348 West
Engineering Bldg.
The faculty will discuss a change
in the name of the Department of
Mechanical Engineering to thef u
"Department of Mechanical and
Industrial Engineering."
The faculty meeting will also MlCH ELE MORGAN
consider the establishment of a
Michigan Transportation InstitutePEi fI AR
as proposed by the civil engineer- I E
ing department.
cluOther issues on the nd in-f "A film of beauty and distinction in every respect."
some rules in the official engi- -Winston, N. Y. Post
neering college announcement re-
garding the election of courses, and "An intense and disturbing film.
in definition of non-technical elec-
tives, and possible delegation of -Crowther, N. Y. Times
power to the Executive Committee
to act on proposed course changes
and new courses. HILL AU D. 50c tax included
'Ensian Sets Proof Fri., Sat. 7:30, 9:30
Deadline at Nov.14
The deadline for 'Ensian senior

I

STARTS TODAY!

f
a

greater assurance
Cowan concludes.

of profits,

Prof.

STUDENT
SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
REPAIRED
+..., i RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago Wirerecorders
MORRI LL' S
314 S. State Ph. 7177

Young Republicans
To Hear Coleman
Michigan State Senator, Creigh-
ton Coleman will talk to the
Young Republicans tonight at 7:30
in the League.
The Senator from the Marshall
district will speak to the YR club
on "Your Legislature," relating his
personal experiences after two
terms in the .Legislature.
Senator Coleman, known for his
work on FEPC and old age pen-
sions, is also an attorney for the
American Federation of Labor.

pleted six months study in the
Near East as a member of a Uni-
versity expedition, will supplement
his talk at the conference lunch-
eon in the League with movies of
Iran and Iraq.
The conference is jointly spon-
sored by the Michigan Association
of Certified Public Accountants
and the School of Business Ad-
ministration.
Union Cuts Price
For 'Aid a' Trip
In an attempt to give more op-
era enthusiasts a chance to see the
Detroit production of "Aida" Tues-
day, the Union has reduced the,
price of its theatre trip to $2.75,
Union Councilman Mark Oscher-
witz, '53, announced yesterday.

I

'4

picture proofs is November 14th,
less than a week away, according
to Dave Palmer, 'Ensian General
Sales Manager.
If seniors don't turn in their
proofs by that date, Palmer said,
the Chidnoff Studio which is hand-
ling the work will choose the pic-
ture which will appear in the 'En-
sian.
a ,

-- Coming Sunday -
"A STREETCAR
NAMED DESIRE"

i v j +
a
. - -

i

ENDS FRIDAY

.i_.,... ..

_... ..

TODAY - FRI. - SAT.
Doone
Barbara HALE
Richard GREENE
PLUS
Glenn FORD
Gene
TIERNEY '.

RED-HOT MUSICAL.!
. l . " I. I . .,

feta ~eedf9 (th e ,Wi'q'n
BARTOK: MUSIC FOR STRINGS, PERCUSSION & CELESTA
BLOCH: CONCERTO GROSSO MG 50001
Chicago Symphony, Kubelik -5.95
POULENC: WIND INSTRUMENT MUSIC REB 7
Fairfield Chamber Group -_5.95
RAVEL: TOMBEAU DE COUPERIN REB 8
GASPARD DE LA NUIT-Weiser, Piano ---5.95
SATIE: MASS FOR THE POOR ES 506
SCHOENBERG: VARIATIONS ON A RECITATIVE ___5.95
CHORUS under Randolph-Marilyn Mason, Organ
SCHOENBERG: PIERROT LUNAIRE Dial 16
Narrator, Chamber Group_________5.
STRAVINSKY: PETROUCHKA LM 1175
Stokowski Symphony -- _-_-5.72
SZYMANOWSKI: VIOLIN CONCERTO DL 7516
Uminska; Philharmonia Orchestra-under Fitelberg __-. --3.85

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