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October 31, 1951 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1951

_________________________________ I

ntellectual
ote Needed
-Shepard
The tendency of peoples of the
orld to face problems emotion-
lly rather than intellectually is
great danger to the maintenance
f freedom, Prof. John F. Shep-
rd, of the psychology department
aid yesterday in a talk before the
ouncil of Arts, Sciences and Pro-
essions.
Prof. Shepard cited the Nazi
egime as an example of the re-
ult of approaching a situation
ithout intellectual consideration.
"INDIVIDUALS are responsible
or new insights," he said, "but it
the reaction of the society
hich determines the effect of
hat insight."
If that reaction is emotional,
he pointed out, a complete loss
of group freedom will be the
result.
"There can be no absolute free-
om, Prof. Shepard said, "there
re always limitations and respon-
ibilities involved in any exercise
f this right." Individual freedom
s mainly the sense of accomplish-
ent which results from satisfac-
ion of the basic drives, he said.
II THIS SENSE of accomplish-
ent is not achieved, frustration
ccurs, such as was evident in this
ountry during periods of extreme
conomic crisis.
"It is in these situations thakt
the psychology of freedom can
be found," he said. "And it is in.
these situations that an emo-
tional outlet will be sought."
Voters, particularly in this coun-
ry, must learn to deal with these
roblems in an intellectual man-
er, if they are to preserve their
reedom, he said.

Senior Picture Deadline Near

--Daiy-^ leid
DEADLINE NEARS-Barbara Lawton, '52, puts her best profile forward for the New York photogra-
pher who is still taking 'Ensian Senior pictures as t he apointment deadline nears. Seniors have until
Friday afternoon, however, and they may sign up f or appointments from 2 to 5:30 p.m. at the Student
Publications Building.
IntroductoryLit Courses Discussed

Soil Reform
Advised by
UN Experts
"The blueprint of action for the
United Nations' agricultural pro-
gram is a Magna Charta of land
reform," Mrs. Ursula H. Duffus
said in a speech yesterday on the
UN's program of land reform.
Mrs. Duffus, connected with the
State Department spoke at Kel-
logg Auditorium yesterday under
the auspices of the School of Na-
tural Resources.
* * *
ACCORDING TO Mrs. Duffus,
a committee of experts and repre-
sentatives from countries in need
of land reform met, under the
leadership of the United States,
and issued a statement of what
they felt should appear in a land
reform program. Their purpose
was to indicate in which direction
a country might work toward land
redistribution, land utilization and
finance, she explained.
Included in their resolution
were recommendations to the gov-
ernments that would participate
in this program.
First they suggested that the
governments should institute
land reform for the small and
medium size farmers. These
farmers should be assured se-
curity of tenure and also have
an opportunity for eventual
ownership.
Proper size of these farms would
be maintained by dividing unduly
large holdings and consolidating
fragmentary ones.
* * *
IN ADDITION, according to
Mrs. Duffus, governments were
advised to "expand institutions
for agricultural credit with em-
phasis on a moderate rate of in-
terest," and not to "overburden
the small farmer with heavy taxa-
tion." They should also legislate
against exorbitant land rentals.
Cooperative organizations for
marketing, packaging, and pur-
chasing of heavy equipment
were advocated.
Mono-crop countries were ad-
vised to diversify their crops.
All the governments were urged
to expand their programs of lit-
eracy and general education. This
last, though not an agricultural
measure is necessary for compre-
hension of modern farming meth-
ods, she added.

ELIKINE

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Yellow cardigan sweater. Call
9322. )26L
LOST-Ladies' lapel watch between Sta-
dium and Vaughn. 412 Adams Hs.
Phone 2-4401.
LOST-A daily assignment spiral not-
book, navy leatherette, in vicinity of
Angell Hall, League, or T.C.B. Im-
portant notes and checkbook inside.
Call Carol Kazahn, 2-5184. )31L
LOST-Brown rim glasses in tan case
and blue pen. Call Evelyn Brache.
3056 Stockwell. )32L
LOST-Composition notebook contain-
ing Far Eastern History notes. Re-
ward. Phone 2-3348. )30L
REWARD - Brown jug missing from
Martha Cook homecoming display.
Desperate for return. Call 2-3225. (315)
)29L
FOR SALE
CANARIES-Beautiful singers' and fe-
males, parakeets and California lin-
nets. 562 S. 7th. Ph. 5330. )
HEADQUARTERS for Levis - Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington St. Open 'til
6 p.m. )
DRESSES, FORMALS-Sizes 10-12, ex-
cellent condition. Ph. 3-0675 after 5:30.
)52
A NEW SHIPMENT of Ronson Lighters.
All styles, all sizes. Burr-Pats, 1209
S. !!U".)5
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE four-room suite for 3-5
men. 1402 Hill. Call' after 5:30 p.m.
)1R
44c Till 5 P.M.
Last Times Today

FOR RENT
FACILITIES for banquets, parties, meet-
ings, dances, receptions, available at
American Legion Home. Ph. 6141. )5F
GIRL WANTED to share lovely two bed-
room furnished apartment. Call 3-0675
6-8 p.m. )8F
ATTRACTIVE 2% room apartment. Pri-
vate bath, stove furnished, near cam-
pus, excellent for student or faculty
couple. Call 2-2400. )22R
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME-Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E, William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
APARTMENT to share with young lady.
Call 3-1511, ext. 2420, days. 3-0413 eve-
nings. ) 23R
BUSINESS SERVICES
KIDDIE KARE
RELIABLE SITTERS available. Phone
3-1121. )2B
TYPEWRITERS and Fountain Pens -
Sales, rentals, and service. l ,)rrill's,
314 S. State fit. )3B
TYPEWRITER Repair Service and Rent-
als at Office Equipment Co. 215 E.
Liberty. )4B
EXPERT TYPING. Reasonable rates. 329
S. Main. Phone 3-4133 or 29092 eve-
nings. )8B

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Experienced. Stencils, thesis
and term papers. 830 S. Main. Ph.
7590.
WASHING--Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )5B
DIAMOND engagement and wedding
rings at wholesale prices. Ph. 2-1809
evenings. L. E. Anger, wholesale agent.
)40
ALTERATIONS-Ladies' garments. Bring
your alterations problems to me.
Catherine near State, 2-2678. )9B
DRESSMAKING, tailoring, alterations,
accurate fittings. Quick service. Phone
9708. ) 13B
CREGIER'S MANUSCRIPT SERVICE--
Theses, term papers typed and edited.
Prices , on request. 315 E. Liberty.
Phone 3-0254. )12B
PERSONAL
TRICK OR TREAT? "Special introduc-
tory offer" or the lower Student-
Faculty rate? Phone 2-8242 and save.
Student Periodical Agency. )2P
MODERN Beauty Shop -- Special on
creme oil permanents-machine, ma-
chineless or cold wave, $5.00, shampoo
and set with cream rinse $1.00. Hair-
cut $1.00. Phone 8100. )13P

a,

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-_Rm- - - - - I -- ---- - - -- - - -- - - - - - - a - ol

I

4.........

(Continued from Page 1)
would force the others to do some
work for a change.
Particularly criticized was the
calibre of teaching in beginning
courses.
Two Naturalists'
Books Published
Two books for the layman na-
turalist have recently been publish-
ed by the University Press.
The first of these, "The Birds
of Michigan," is written by Nor-
man A. Wood, who was curator of
birds in the University Museum of
Zoology until his death in 1943.
"Puffballs and their Allies in
Michigan" by Alexander H. Smith,
University botanist, describes vari-
ous forms of fungi.
'Mat. til 5 P.M. - 30c
Nights - Sun. - 44c
STARTS TODAY
~e **
r appyGO"LyVclc
to N
----- -- Plus - - -
GLENN ANNE 1
FORDOBAXTER
I
[ I
DENNIS JUNE
O'KEEFE - HAVOC
Read and Use

"It seems that many depart-
ments consider introductory and
survey courses as stepchildren and
as a result there is poor teaching
in them, especially from teaching
fellows," one student complained.
AS A REBUTTAL, Prof. Fel-
heim said that this may be be-
cause the students themselves are
not interested and do not attempt!
to give something to the course.
They refuse to read one more page
a week than they are assigned."
When the faculty members
were asked by another student
how long they spend preparing
for a lecture so as to make it
"interesting, even inspiring," no
answer was given.
Many complaints were lodged
against the inability of teaching
fellows to teach. It was suggested
that they take several courses in
instruction before entering a class.

Several faculty members jump-
ed to the defense, noting the diffi-
culty of conducting a recitation
class and saying that they make
up in enthusiasm what they lack
in organization.
Another point attacked by stu-
dents was recitation classes. Many
thought they were poorly con-
ducted and "a general waste of
time." However it was pointed out
that the purpose of such sections
was to take away the feeling of
"bigness" in the University.
AFTER THE MEETING, a spe-
cial committee was appointed to
draw up a report of the conference
for later presentation to the liter-
ary college.
Approximately five more such
conferences are planned for the
school year. the dates and topics
to be discussed at these confer-
ences have not yet been announ-
ced.

HILL AUDITORIUM-Ann Arbor-THURSDAY, NOV.
TWO PERFORMANCES ONLY-7:00 P.M. and 9:15 P.M.
Conger Group of Michigan Alumnae presents for Benefit of Student,
The BIGGEST Ay
including: Timmie Rogers, Peg Leg Bates,
Stump and Stumpy Patterson and Jackson
and the Marie Bryant Dancers.
ALL SEATS RESERVED: Send check and
self-addressed stamped envelope to P.O. Box
2008, Ann Arbor. BE SURE TO INDICATE
WHICH PERFORMANCE TIME IS REQUIR-
ED. Make check payable to Conger Alumnae.
PRICES: Main Floor $2.40, First Balcony $1.80,
Second Balcony $1.20 (tax included)
SEAT SALE STARTS NEXT MONDAY ..
HILL AUDITORIUM BOX OFFICE.

15
Aid

__ s

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NOW

/0

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

mui~ i pjq s'.1 aU In....L
-Coming Thursday

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
2552 Administration Building before
3 p.m. the day preceding publication
(11 a.m. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1951
VOL. LXII, NO. 31
Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Nov. 23, 2:30
p.m. Communications for considera-
tion at this meeting must be in the
President's hands not later than Nov.
15.
University Senate Meeting, Mon., Dec.
17, 4:15 p.m., in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre for the election of committee
members and for theconsideration of
reports and other business. Matters to
be included on the agenda should be
brought to the attention of the Secre-
tary by Sat., Dec. 1, 1951.
Parking--Hospital Area:
Beginning Nov. 5, all driveways and
roadways in the University Hospital
area will be patrolled by the Ann Arbor
Police Department, and the owners of
cars found parked in "No Parking" sec-
tions of these thoroughfares will be
subject to rules governing their use.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary

Seniors: College of L.S. & A., and
Schools of Education, Music, and Pub-
lic Health:
Tentative lists of seniors for February
graduation have been posted on the
Registrar's bulletin board in the first
floor corridor, Administration Bldg.
Any changes therefrom should be re-
quested of the Recorder at Registrar's
window number 1, 1513 Administration
Bldg.
Union Student Offices will be open
Thursday night from 7 to 9. All men
who have been unable to pick up their
Union membership cards during the
regular office hours are invited to pick
them up at this time.
Approved Social Events:
October 31-
Sigma Delta Tau
November 2-
Alpha Xi Dclta
Couzens Hall
Jordan Hall
Kappa Alpha Theta
Phi Gamma Delta - Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon
November 3--
Adams House
Alpha Chi Sigma
Alpha Kappa Alpha - Alpha Phi Alpha
Alpha Omega
Anderson House
Beta Theta Pi
Delta Tau Delta

Graduate Outing Club
Greene House
Hillel Foundation
Lambda Chi Alpha
Inter Co-operative Council
Nakamura House
Kleinsteuck - Alice Lloyd Hall
Phi Delta Phi
Psi Omega
Sigma Nu
Taylor House
Theta Delta
Winchell House
November 4-
Delta Chi
Graduate Outing Club
Hillel Foundation
Phi Delta Phi
Social chairmen are reminded that
requests for approval for social events
must be in the Office of Student Af-
fairs not later than 12 o'clock noon
on the Monday preceding the event.
Personnel Interviews
Monday, November 5, a representative
of the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation of
Marietta, Georgia, will be interviewing
February graduates of Electrical En-
gineering, Mechanical Engineering,
Aeronautical Engineering, and Indus-
trial Engineering.
Monday, November 5, and Tuesday,
November 6, a representative of the
United States Civil Service Commission
will be talking to any students who
J (Continued on Page 4)

CINEMA GUILD and
WSS F
present
Preston Sturgis4
It
UnfaithfullyYours
Linda barnell Rex Harrison
We ire proud to return to campus the favorite film
of our summer program . . . In our opinion it is
one of the funniest comedies of the last five years.
-THE S.L. CINEMA GUILD
Arch. Aud. 50c tax included
Fri., Sat. 7:30, 9:30

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

"FORCE OF ARMS"

FINAL WEEK

L

"THE SULKY FIRE"
By JEAN JACQUES BERNARD
Discussion will follow tonight's performance
THE ARTS THEATER CLUB
Ann Arbor's Professional Theater

HEAR THEM AS THEY REALLY
SOUND WITH...RELECTRIC
Frdm the unsure fingers of the stu-
dent to the crashing cr4scendo of
the artist Ekotape records every RECORDER-REPRODUCE t
note exactly as at is played, You'll
be amazed at the fidelity of repro-
ductions made and played on Eko-
tape-first choice of musicians and

'x

1111

t AWWW '' '9T ' lr.AW"" A NV'4

Ill

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