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October 31, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-31

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Perry Named Lineman of Week in AP Gr

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I

THE MORNING LINE
By TED PAPES
Daily Sports Editor
LAST Sunday's National Football League contest between the Detroit
Lions and Chicago Bears was billed as a clash of title contenders,
but somehow the result left 36,950 Briggs Stadium customers skeptical
of the chances for either club.
For the Lions the 28 to 23 setback may have been the end of the
line as far as 1951 is concerned. Their record now shows two defeats
and a tie in five tries. They would have to be near-perfect in their
remaining seven battles and that's almost impossible in the pro game
as it is played today.
It's pretty difficult to figure just what Detroit's trouble has been
after getting off to an excellent start by winning it's first two games.
Layne Not Dependable,
"UARTERBACK BOBBY LAYNE simply looked too inconsistent in
Y his passing Sunday. The fact that his offensive line failed to
hold up for his protection and that his receivers couldn't shake loose
from the Bear secondary had a lot to do with the former Texas All-
American's dismal showing.
The Detroit ground game isn't good enough to take up the
slack. Even the great Doak Walker is in a slump, and the other
backs can't seem to gain any yardage up the middle. Lion rush-
ing was unimaginative both against Chicago and Los Angeles
two weeks ago in another losing effort.
These passing and running shortcomings make it too difficult
for Detroit to sustain a goalward drive with clutch plays on third
or fourth down. Inept downfield blocking on kick returns is another
sore point with coach Buddy Parker.
Over in the Bear camp times aren't much more prosperous,
even though the Halasmen are currently leading the pack in their
National Conference with a 4-1 record on the season.
The famed Monsters of the Midway were only a shadow of their
former selves in the Lion game, and their other victories have been
close decisions, without signs of slick gridiron trickery and mastery
once characteristic of Chicago entries.
Injuries Plague Bears
HJANDICAPPED BY THE ABSENCE of three -key players, Johnny
Lujack, Whizzer White and Al Campana, the Bears just barely
stumbled through their last two contests. They'll have to be twice
as good to stay on the same field with the Los Angeles Rams and
Cleveland Browns, both future opponents.
Halas U. is presently made up of a curious alliance of fresh
youngsters and aging veterans of the Bulldog Turner vintage. The
defensive unit was guilty of high, insecure tackling all afternoon
against the Lions, and the pass defense was alternately hot and cold.
The ends are a little slow, even when they break into the
clear, but they did manage to hold onto enough long passes to
throttle Detroit.
Punting specialist Fred Morrison was the red-faced author of
a 16 yard boot early in the game, a mistake which could cost a cham-
pionship in professional wars. Chicago is weak on field goal produc-
tion too, demonstrated by George Blanda's 18 yard failure followed
by a blocked attempt later in the gai'e. It will be remembered that
Cleveland won the loop laurels last year on the strength of an educat-
ed toe, Lou Groza's.

Versatile End Also Ranked
Locally as Best '111' Player

By HERB COHEN
'Lowell Perry, Michigan's fabu-'
lous offensive end and defensive
safety man, was yesterday voted
the lineman of the week in the
weekly Associated Press survey.
Perry was cited by the scribes,
both nationally and locally, for his
fine offensive work in Michigan's
54-27 rout of Minnesota.
* * *
IN THAT GAME, which found
the Wolverines playing primarily
as a team and not as eleven in-
dividuals, Perry along with Wes
Bradford and Tom Johnson had
a little more to do with the lop-
sided win than most of the others.
Perry was truly one of the
Wolverine's inspirations as he
caught two touchdown passes,
one good for 71 yards and the
other for 25. In addition he re-
turned a Minnesota punt for 75
yards behind perfect blocking to
cross the double chalk line for
a third time.
Both of these scoring heaves
were thrown by Ted Topor, who is
now an additional passing threat
in the Wolverine backfield. Pre-
viously to this week Bill Putich
and Don Peterson had done most
of the Michigan passing, with
Putich almost always passing to
Perry.
TOM JOHNSON, stalwart Mich-
igan tackle, was also mentioned in
this week's AP poll.
As usual he headed a Wolver-
ine line which deserves equal
credit for last Saturday's win.
He played both offensive and
Hogan To See
Full Service
In Ryder Cup
PINEHURST, N.C. -()- Cap-
tain Sam Snead announced three-
fourths of his lineup for the Ryd-
er Cup Scotch foursome matches
yesterday and said National Open
champion Ben Hogen would see
double duty against the British
golfers this week-end.
"Hogan definitely will play in
both the team and singles mat-
ches," said the PGA titleholder
from White Sulphur, West Va.,
who leads U.S. Forces in this in-
ternational competition.
HOGAN, RELATIVELY inactive
since he won the National Open
at Oakland Hills in June, had in-
dicated he might want to play on-
ly one day."
He checked in yesterday, how-
ever, and notified Captain Snead
he's ready for full service, if
needed.
"I'm a little rusty but I feel I
can get my game in shape in a
couple of days," he said.
* * *
SNEAD SAID HOGAN would
team with his old sidekick, Jimmy
Demaret of Jail, Calif., in Fri-
day's foursome while Snead him-
self will pair with Lloyd Mangrum
of Niles, Ill.
The other definite tandem is
Jackie Burke of Houston, baby
of the U.S. Ryder team, and big
Clayton Haefner of Charlotte,
N.C.
"I don't know how we'll line up
for the fourth spot," Sneadsaid.
"We'd like to use all ten men on
the squad so the two who play as
the other team in the Scotch four-
somes probably will sit out the
singles.
Four team matches are sched-
uled Friday and eight singles set
for Sunday. There is a layoff Sat-
urday while everybody goes to the
Tennessee-North Carolina football
game at nearby Chapel Hill, N.C.
The other two U.S. players are
E. J. (Dutch) Harrison and Henry
Ransom, both registering from St.
Andrews, Ill.

defensive tackle and time and
again broke through to trap
Gopher backfield men for long
losses.
Wes Bradford, who may have
played his last game before being,
inducted into the service, also
played one of the better games of
his career.
S* *
IN THE FIRST stanza after Ron
Engel had run the kickoff back 94
yards to pay dirt, Bradford took

Wolverines Il GRID BRIEFS:
Work to Halt ATO Smas
- - Delta Chi Si
Illini Attack D
By DICK LEWIS
Bradfo rd to Pla One of the most diversified of-
PlaOy fenses seen in intramural football
Another Game in a long time planted Alpha Tau
Omega in the semi-final round of
the first place fraternity playoffs
The key to a Michigan victory yesterday.
over the Illini Saturday afternoon The powerful ATO aggregation
appears to lie in the possession of racked up seven touchdowns while
a strong defense capable of halt- defeating Triangle, 51-0.
ing- the vaunted Illinois attack. * *

lFoot Injurv
ies Triangle; To Sideline
igma Phi WinMcEwe

onto a twenty yard pass for the
second counter. Bradshaw alsoI
added the extra point.
Third place playoff action saw
Phi Sigma Delta move into the
semi-final round by outlasting
Beta Theta Pi, 6-2.
After a scoreless first half, Phil
Barad gathered in a 25-yard pass
from Bob Horwitch for the six
points.
Three touchdown thrusts by Bob
Weber handed the Nu Sigma Nu
'B' team its second success of the
professional fraternity campaign,
a 20-0 defeat of Alpha Rho Chi.

Don McEwen. Michigan's in-
comparable distance runner, will
be unable to defend his Western
Conference Cross Country Cham-
pionship, track coach Don Can-
ham disclosed yesterday.
The affable Canadian, who had
taken the hill and dale laurels two
years in succession. has been tem-
porarily sidelined by a minor foot
injury, and will be out of action
for perhaps the rest of the cross
country campaign. He Was sched-
uled to compete in the Big Ten
meet at Chicago on November 16.

With this in mind Coach Bennie
Oosterbaan gave the Wolverines a
lengthy session on the art of halt-
ing the opponent in yesterday's
practice at Ferry Field.
ATTENTION was focused on
building up a defense designed to
stop the running of Johnny Kar-
ras and Company. although pass
defense was not completely ne-
glected.

i
f
t
f
S
L

If Michigan is able to hold
the Illini in check it will do
what no other team except Wis-
consin has come close to doing.

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LOWELL PERRY
. . . people's choice
the ball on the second play from
scrimmage and scampered 49
yards on the famous "Koceski"
reverse. He eluded several would
be tacklers and crossed the Go-
pher goal line to tie the score.
Later in the second period he
capped another Michigan scor-
ing drive and plunged over from
the three yard line to score the
Wolverines third touchdown.
Bradford turned out to be
Michigan's best ground gainer as
he rolled up a total of 177 yards,
98 of which were gained on ten
carries through the Minnesota
line.
In the eyes of most of the
sportswriters, the best Gopher
player in Michigan stadium was
Paul Giel.
Giel was really the whole show
for Minnesota as he completed 12
of 25 passes for 177 yards. He
also had five passes intercepted
but this was attributed more to
the Michigan pass defense than to
a lack of ability on the part of
Giel.
As adept as he was at passing,
the Minnesota sophomore was per-
haps even more sensational as a
runner. In all he gained a net
total of 104 yards through the
Michigan line on 24 carries. This
represented a gain of 4.52 yards
a try.
The Gopher tailback also got off
four beautiful punts for an aver-
age of 40.5 yards per boot.
AJLJJh

Illinois has crossed the goal line
of its opponents at least four
times in each of its other four
encounters.
THE WOLVERINES employed
several different defensive forma-
tions against the reserves, who
ran Illini plays out of the T-for-
mation for the most part.
The defensive unit halted the
reserves running attack quite
successfully, being sparked by
the line backers who broke
through to stop a number of
plays for losses. Oosterbaan al-
ternated Roger Zatkoff, Ted
Topor, Gene Knutson, and Larry
LeClaire in the two line-backing
positions.
Don Oldham and Dave Tinkham
were at their customary defensive
halfback positions, while Lowell
Perry and Bill Putich handled the
safety assignment.
* * *
THE PASS defense was not as
sparkling as the rushing defense
as reserve quarterback Mark Scarr,
impersonating I 11 i n o i s' Tom
O'Connell, met with some success
in his limited passing attack. This
portion of the defense will no
doubt be given a good working
over in this afternoon and to-
morrow's drills, however.
The offensive team went to
work late in the afternoon, mov-
ing up and down the field against
the reserves.
Michigan's army-bound W e s
Bradford continues to work out
at the right halfback position.
Oosterbaan does not know when
the first-string wingback will be
inducted, but expects him to still
be a civilian Saturday afternoon.
The time of Bradford's induc-
tion hinges on when the Ann Ar-
bor draft board will use him to
meet its quota. Bradford had pre-
viously transferred his induction
from his home town draft board,
Troy, Ohio, to the Ann Arbor
board.
The offense centered principally
on the aerial attack, as Bill Put-
ich threw passes to Perry, Fred
Pickard,aTopor, and the halfbacks.
Topor and Don Peterson also
pitched a few passes during the
offensive maneuvers.

PINPOINT PASSING by Howie
Maturen accounted for five scor-
ing tallies. Maturen, who complet-
ed twelve out of fifteen tosses, hit
Don Fackle' with pay dirt heaves
of 30 and 40 yards, found Don Weir
with a 30-yard touchdown aerial
and a flat pass which also went for
a score. and spotted Bruno Boel-'
stler with a jump pass in the end
zone for another marker.
The versatile passer ran back
an intercepted pass forty yards
for six more points, while Boel-
stler returned a punt the length
of the field for the seventh
counter.
A LAST-MINUTE Sigma Alpha
Mu rally failed to catch Delta Chi,
which eked out an 8-6 triumph.
Delta Chi scored first as Fred
Roneker found Jim Cape with a
five-yard pass in the end zone.
Shortly after, Bill Cortright cor-
nered Dan Fogel in the end zone
for two more points and the win-
ning margin.
Fogel inaugurated the SAM
thrust by intercepting a Delta
Chi pass at mid-field. He then
threw thirty yards to Mort
Friedman for the loser's lone
score.
Jack White connected with two
paydirt aerials and an extra point
toss to give Sigma. Phi a 13-0 win
over Chi Phi.
Don Johnson hauled in a 45-yard
throw or, the first play from scrim-
mage, and Bruce Bradshaw hung

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Alpha Chi Sigma swampe the McEwen captured the harrier
Air Force, 34-0. in the only other honors first in 1949 when he sur-
gridiron activity. prised Don Gehrmann, Wiscon-
sin's two-time distance king, by
Williamns Takes setting a new Big Ten and course
record of 19:44.5 for the four mile
IM Cross-Countrytrek.
Last fall. McEwen turned in the
Williams House captured the fastest four-mile cross country
cross-country trophy for the sec- jaunt ever recorded, winning the
ond straight year yesterday, plac- individual crown in 19:34.1 at
ing five men in the top twenty- Washington Park, the very same
five. course where the championship
Individual honors went to Chuck will be held next month.
Hatch of Hayden House who tour- Coach Canham plans to send a
ed the two and one-half mile full squad against the defending
course in 11:13. champion, Wisconsin.
OPEN 2 A.M. - 2 P.M. DAILY
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