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October 20, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-20

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER: 20, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1951 PAGE

Waldorf 's Bears
Tennessee Encounters Alabama;
MSC Goes East To Meet Penn State

Ri

e, Commack, Williams Bear Brunt j
Of Iowa's Dangerous Running Attack

CIRISIEK05

NEW YORK--P)-The Univer-
sity of Ca]fornia's Golden Bears
put their No. 1 national footbaal
rating smack on the line today
against the ever-dangerous Tro-
jans of Southern California.
For that matter, so do all of the
other highly-ranked college out-
fits, risking reputations and votes
in big games from coast to coast.
A SELLOUT throng of 81,500 in
Berkeley's Memorial Stadium will
watch the Bears go after their 39th
consecutive regular season victory.
Coach Lynn Waldorf's high-scor-
ing California club rules a two-
toucdown favorite over the men
of Troy.
Another capacity crowd of
45,000 at Birmingham will sit
in on the game between Ten-
nessee, the No. 2 team, and
thrice-defeated Alabama. Ten-
nessee is favored by two touch-
downs in a traditional game for
these Southeastern Conference
rivals.
First place in the Southeastern
Conference is at stake in Atlanta,
where 35,000 will turn out to see
-. Auburn engage favored Georgia
Tech.
S* *
AT COLLEGE Park, Md., Mary-
land faces a stern test in North
Carolina. Maryland is listed No.
7 in the land.
Eastern fans will get a chance
to see why Michigan State is
rated No. 3 when the Spartans
tackle Penn State before a ca-
pacity crowd of 30,000 at State
College, Pa. Michigan State was
the No. 1 team until displaced
this week in the Associated. Press
poll by California.
Another intersectional fray be-
tween Pitt and Notre Dame at
Pittsburgh will lure a sellout
crowd of 60,000 into Pitt Stadium.
Notre Dame, hoping to come back
after being defeated by Southern
Methodist last week, hasn't lost to
Pitt since 1937.
Illinois, which invaded the East
last week to beat Syracuse, travels
West this time to tangle with
powerful Washington at Seattle.
Illinois, the No. 8 team, is a five-
point favorite in the game which
. is a 55,000 sellout.
Cornell is at Yale tomorrow,
while unbeaten, untied and un-
scored upon Columbia goes to
Philadelphia to meet Ptennsyl-
vania.

AEPi Seven.
First Victim
Of Theta Chi
esleyans Romp;
Hawaiians Score
By DICK LEWIS
Two first half touchdown passes
from Roy Haukinson to Ty Ricki
gave Theta Chi its first gridiron
triumph of the season, a 13-7 vic-
tory over Alpha Epsilon Pi.
In addition to the Z0- and 10-
yard payoff heaves, Haukinson al-
so hit Bob Moeller in the end zone
for the thirteeneth marker. A thir-
ty yard pass from Warren Robbins
to Larry Gray accounted for the
sole A E Pi touchdown. Bob Satin
added the extra point on another
throw from Robbins.
* * *
INDEPENDENT play saw Wes-
leyan trounce Roger Williams, 22-
0, for its third straight win.
Dave Church inaugurated the
romp by gathering in a 30-yard
Bob Heller pay dirt aerial.
Church, in turn, intercepted a
Williams pass and ran 40 yards
for the second tally.
Ed Wolven added the final Wes-
leyan touchdown by turning end
for forty yards. Wolve'n also
counted with an extra point on a
toss from Howie Berkman, who
had scored a one-pointer earlier.
The hard-charging Wesleyan line
trapped a Williams back in the end
zone for a safety and the final
two points.
Hugo Seto capped a twenty-five
yard drive to score from one yard
out, thereby giving the Hawaiians
a 6-0 win over Nakamura. The
pay-off tally was set up by a
twenty yard pass from Seto to Cle-
ment Tam.

(Continued from Page 1)
But it's been a far different
story since then. While the Wol-
verines hold an overall edge of
ten victories to two for Iowa and
one tie, all but two of the eight
games since 1902 have been set-
tled by not more than eight points.
And that was a 10-2 Hawkeye vic-
tory in 1924, the last time they
were able to beat the Wolverines.
TODAY'S GAME promises to be'
just as close as its predecessors:
Although Iowa lost its only Big
Ten game to Purdue, 34-30, two
weeks ago, the Hawkeyes have ex-
* * *

for an average of 170 yards per
game.
Five of Britzmann's aerials
have gone for touchdowns,
three of which came at the ex-
pense of Pittsburgh in a 34-17
Iowa triumph last weekend. His
12 completions (of 25 attempt-
ed) against the Panthers tied
the Iowa record made by Glenn
Drahn against UCLA in 1949
and his passing yardage was just
seve yards short of the Hawk-
eyes' mark.
The sophomore signal caller also
scored once himself on a quarter-
back sneak, but the big running
attraction was Williams' 47 yard
scamper that produced another
six points.
* * *
DEFENSIVELY, Iowa has held
opposing runners to an average
of 72.3 meager yards per game,
* * *

GEORGE RICE
. . . sophomore flash
hibited an offense that is capable
of blowing the top off any team
that would be so foolish as to
under-rate them.
Heralded as the most versa-
tile and explosive attack pos-
sessed by Iowa in recent years,
it relies on the standout run-
ning of George "Dusty" Rice,
Loranzie Williams, Don Com-
mack and Bill Reichardt, second
best ground gainer in the Big
Ten last year.
With Williams and Rice averag-
ing 7.6 and 6.3 yards per carry re-
spectively, this foursome has ram-
bled for an average of 283 yards
per game in three outings this
year.
* * *.
IN THE AIR lanes quarterback
Burt Britzmann's passes have
found their mark 49% of the time

DON COMMACK
. .. another speedster
which ranks as fourth best in the
nation. In the air, however, the
Hawkeyes have permitted 39 of
69 passes to pass through for com-
pletions, and, with Michigan's aer-
ial warfare beginning to pick up,
this could be a deciding factor this
afternoon.
But Oosterbaan' is not selling
Iowa short. This he emphasized
to his players at the end of a
light drill at Cedar Rapids yes-
terday.
Michigan spirits, however, were
high. The only unhappy notes

were the absence of wingback
Frank Howell, who remained in
Ann Arbor with an ankle injury,
and the realization that Wes
Bradford would be starting at
right half for the last time for
awhile, now that he has to re-
port for induction into the army
next Tuesday.
BUT THE REBIRTH of the
Michigan passing game - with
leaping Lowell Perry hauling them
in from either Don Peterson or
Bill Putich - and the improving
smoothness in the backfield-fea-
turing the running of Putich, Pe-
terson and Bradford-are the en-
couraging factors for the task at
hand-to beat Iowa.
Add to that the presence of the
indestructable Tom Johnson, who
successfully fought off an attack
of the flu this week, and the pos-
sibility that Ted Topor will be
backing up the line again in ad-
dition to playing quarterback and
you have a Wolverine defense that
will be out to give the Hawkeye
defenders a dose of their own
medicine.
Redskins Sign
Todd to Head
Coaching ,Job
WASHINGTON-(4')-Pro foot-
ball commissioner Bert Bell yes-
terday ruled that Heartley (Hunk)
Anderson could not sign as head
coach of the Washington Red-
skins. The Redskins promptly gave
the job to Dick Todd, former Texas
A. and M. star.
Todd succeeds Herman Ball,
who had been head man since the
middle of the 1949 season. Todd
had been one of his assistants.
* * *
BALL WILL stay on with the
Redskin organization in the same
job he had when he started with
them-as a scout. ,
The announcement of the de-
velopments came from Redskin
general manager Dick McCann.
McCann said that Bell had ruled
that Anderson was under contract
to the Chicago Bears, and that
since the Bears now say they want
him back, Anderson could not sign
with another team.
IRONICALLY, Anderson had
held a news conference at the
Redskin office yesterday, and had
explained what plans he meant to
carry out when he became top
hand.
Anderson had been line coach
for the Bears for 11 seasons, but
quit this year to sell steel in
Detroit. But even though he is
no longer with the Bears, his
contract with them still runs
until Dec. 31.
McCann said Anderson will not
SPORTS
GENE MACKEVICH
Night Editor
return to the Bears, but will go
back to peddling steel in Detroit.
Todd, 37, was a great high
school football player at Crowell,
Tex., where he scored 318 points
in one season.
Even though he was playing
with comparatively weak teams at
Texas A. and M., he still managed
to stand out, so much so that he
went into pro ball weighing but
170 pounds.

-T

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78 RPM RECORDS-4 albums totaling
32 records. Excellent condition. Opera
by Gounod, Debussy and Ravel. Give
away for $16. Phone 2-5530. )44

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I

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FACILITIES for banquets, parties, meet-
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ROOM FOR YOUNG MAN-Corner of
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ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS TOURIST HOME--Rooms by
day or week. Bath, shower, television.
518 E. William St. Phone 3-8454. )2R
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Call 2-7108 or 2-9410. )20R
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I

MOSTLY MICHIGAN'S:
Hawkeye Tussle Recalls Past Glories

Continuous from 1 P.M.
Weekdays 44c to 5 P.M.
Last Times Today
(2XA
-NX-
Starts Sunday --
SKIES!.

,, _

In the Midwest, Indiana is at By HERB NEIL
Ohio State, Michigan plays at When Michigan engages the
Iowa, Wisconsin at Purdue, and Iowa Hawkeyes this afternoon it
Colorado at Kansas State. Navy, will mark the first time the two
trying to get in the win column, teams have met in five years and
meets Northwestern at Evanston, the first trip to Iowa for Wolver-
ine gridmen since 1937.
The Hawkeyes, who have not
defeated the Wolverines since
1924, have been able to garner
only two victories at the expense
of Michigan, while losing ten
times since the series was inaug-
urated in 1900. The 1929 game
ended in a scoreless tie.
THE WOLVERINE victory over
the Hawkeyes in 1902, established
a Conference scoring record as
a.Fielding H. Yost's "point a min-
ute" team rang up the astronomi-
cal figure of 107 points against
the hapless Iowans. After tchis
landslide Iowa did not meet Mich-
igan on the, gridiron for another
f ! 21 years.
What will Elizabeth's J Although all the Wolverine
' Jwins have not quite measured
Stow accomplish? I up to the score of the 1902 bat-
tle, one of Michigan's most
Find out in J noteworthy victories over the
Hawkeyes came in 1939 by a
27-7 count.
This battle pitted two of the
Western Conference's greatest all-
E C EGtimegbacks against each other,
Michigao's< Tom Harmon, and
F US E EIowa's Nile KMinnick.
ody J Harmon won the honors for the
LGetourcOpy Ztod yday as he accounted for all of the
Y- Wolverines' point - production,

while Kinnick was throwing a
touchdown pass for Iowa's loie
score.
- * *
KINNICK WAS the first to get
the scoring underway, as he
threw a 50-yard pass to Floyd
Dean less than five minutes after
the contest had started, and then
drop-kicked the extra point to put
the visiting Hawkeyes in front for
the only time all afternoon.
After this early reversal, how-
ever, Harmon quickly led the
Wolverines back into the lead.
The Michigan halfback's pass-
ing sparked a 39-yard drive cul-
minating in Harmon's one-yard
smash through left guard to
paydirt. His conversion then
put the Wolverines even with
Iowa.
Harmon personally accounted
for two more tallies in the second
quarter, one coming on a two-
yard run through guard, and the
other on an eight-yard runaround
end.
*' * *
THE WOLVERINE star's pass
to Forest Evashevski and his end
run of 11 yards had set up the
first score, and his end run from

the Iowa 38 to the 8 preceded his
third touchdown of the day.
Harmon's final touchdown
came in the third quarter on
the most spectacular play of the
day, a 95-yard dash down the
sidelines after he had intercept-
ed one of Kinnick's passes. The
Wolverine halfback's conversion
ended the Michigan and Har-
mon scoring for the day.
The Wolverine victory over the
Iowans cost the Hawkeyes their
first Big Ten championship since
1922, as Iowa finished second to
Ohio State.
* * *;
ALTHOUGH Michigan has no
back this year to compare with
Harmon, the Hawkeyes, who are
still looking for their first Con-
ference crown since 1922, have
the makings of another Kinnick'
in sophomore left halfback "Dus-
ty" Rice.
Rice won the Associated Press
award for "Back of the Week,"
returned a kick-off 100 yards,
scored on a 69-yard running play
from scrimmage, and caught a
55-yard pass for another touch-
down in his first three weeks of
intercollegiate football.

I

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Continues Nightly, Except Monday, Through Nov. 4
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