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October 20, 1951 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-20

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1951

FOUR

THEi MICHIGAN DAILY

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oston Symphony To Give
wo Performances Here

Rooms Set
For Dec.13
Draft Examt

I.

SENTIMENTAL PIONEER:

Vee p'Niehuss Shows Michigan Spirit

he Boston Symphony Orches-
under Charles Munch will'
in highlight both the Choral
on Series and the Extra Con-
Series when it appears 8:30
. Sunday and Monday in Hill
itorium.
eatured in the Choral Union
lcert Sunday will be Arthur
negger's "Symphony No. 5,"
ch will be performed in Ann
or for the first time. Written
re Debators
o Partici pate
a Clinic Here

for the Koussevitsky Musk Foun-
dation, it was introduced in Bos-
ton by Munch.
4 * *
THE SUNDAY concert will also
feature Symphony No. 6, "Pathe-
tique" by Tchaikovsky, and "Over-
ture to Egmont" by Beethoven.
Scheduled for the Extra Ser-
ies concert Monday is "Sym-
phony No. 4 in D minor" by
Schumann; Suite from "Darda-
nus" by Rameau; "Tod und
Verklarung" by Strauss; and
Rapsodie Espagnole by Ravel.

More than 350 students from 35
ate high schools will take part in
e fifth annual Debate Clinic here
day, sponsored by the speech de-
artment.
Teachers and members of de-
te classes will receive pointers on
chniques of discussion and de-
ate from University speech stu-
ents and professors.
Clinic demonstrations will use
e topic "Resolved that all Amer-
an citizens be subject to con-
ription for essential service in
me of war," which has been
iosen by the Michigan High
chool Forensic Association as the'
,atewide elimination debate topic.
The morning clinic session will
e welcomed by Hayden K. Car-
ith, manager of the Forensic As-
ciation. Prof. William M. Sattler
the speech department will di-
ect and criticize demonstrations
y 14 University speech students.
In the afternoon four members
the Varsity Debate Squad will
emonstrate the "Michigan-style"
ebate technique, followed by a
ritique by Prof. N. E. Miller, Jr.
The University began the first
ebate Clinic five years ago and
nce then has encouraged other
ate schools to hold similar clinics
1 their areas.
-- - - 1

Munch, who succeeded Serge
Koussevitsky three years ago as
conductor of the Symphony, has
had a long and successful career
giving'him a background rich in
world-wide experience. Even now
with his crowded winter season
and Berkshire Festival of July and
-August he conducts as often as
possible in France, Italy, Belgium
and Holland.
The Symphony Orchestra itself,
originated in 1881, has had a long
standing tradition of open Friday
rehearsals for students and people
of limited price. In recent years
this has been extended to Thurs-
day nights since the Friday "re-
hearsals" have long since become
concerts.
In, addition, certain other re-
hearsals are broadcast each week,
and the popular Boston "Espla-
nade" Open Air Concerts during
the summer before the Berkshire
Music Festival are famous
throughout the country.
Local Group
TO Sponsor
Puppet Shows

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The Bureau of Psychological
ervices announced yesterday that
he Dec. 13 college qualification:
est will be given in Rms. 130 and
40 Business Administration Build-
ing, 100 Hutchins.Hall and 101
Economics Building.
Officials pointed out that the se-
ection of rooms was tentative un-
il the Selective Service informs
hem of the number of students
that will be taking the test.
Students will be given their
room assignments by the Selective
Service after their test applica-
ion is sent in.
Test application blanks may be
picked up at any Selective Service
Board. To be eligible for the Dec.
13 exam, the application must be
postmarked not later than mid-
night, Nov. 5. A student cannot
apply for the December test and
then take the one scheduled for
April 24 without filing a new ap-
plication.
There is no age limit in force
for the coming exams because
Congress has lifted the draft age
to 35. Previously, no man over
twenty-six years old could take
the test.
To be eligible to apply for the
test, students must be pursuing a
full time course and must not pre.
viously have taken the test. Any
student, regardless of undergradu-
ate status that meets this require-
ment can apply for tl;e exam.
If a student scores high enoug2
on the test, he may request re-
classification from his local board
However, a passing score does not
guarantee automatic deferment.

By CAL SAMRA
Probably no one on campus has
more of that intangible peculiarity
called "Michigan spirit" than Vice-
President Marvin L. Niehuss.
That spirit isn't definable; it's
hard to put into words. But what-
ever it is, Niehuss has it.
CONSERVATIVE IN dress, quiet
in speech, Niehuss in his new capa-
city as Dean of Faculties, acts like
a man dedicated to the welfare of
the University.
When engrossed in a conversa-
tion, Niehuss will invariably recall
with a kind of sentimentality the
amazing progress of the Univer-
sity during the past 50 years.
Having been with the Uniyer-
sity 30 of those years, Niehuss
points with pride at what he
calls "progressive conservatism"
of this institution.
"We've always pioneered in edu-
cation," the cigar-smoking official
explained, "but at the same time
we've learned to value what we
have."
CITING HIS philosophy of edu-
cation and administration, he in-
sisted that an ideal administrator
should be far-sighted and prepar-
ed with long-range programs, but
at the same time aware of the fact

for the schools and colleges by
which it is carried on.
IN CONTINUAL contact with
the various deans, Niehuss' office
is concerned, among other things,
with appointments, promotions,
faculty salaries, and leaves of ab-
sence.
Finally, Niehuss is ' the' man
(with the headache) behind the
annual preparation and presenta-
tion of the University budget to
the State Legislature. His former
post as an instructor in ecolomics
at the University and as a special-
ist in real estate and land eco-
nomics qualifies him for the job.
Actually, Niehuss will usually
avoid discussing the University's
budget situation. And no one can
blame him, for it encompasses a
lot of hard work and is a brittle
topic.
What does he do in his spare
time? At this writing he's still
thinking about a game of golf with
President Hatcher. Whether either
of them will get out for a round,
however, is questionable.

V.

A

-Daily-Alan Reid
TIME OUT-Campus mailman Arthur Gerstler takes a moment
to look at his part in the forthcoming Student Players' produc-
tion of "Two Blind Mice." Gerstler plays a postman in the satirical
farce which will run Thursday, Friday and Saturday at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
* * * *
Mailman Hits Footlights
In Players' Production

forth scoos ad*ollge b

MARVIN NIEHUSS
. . 'U' Vice-President
that many of his plans will be dis-
carded.
At present, Niehuss is carrying
out his newly-assumed duties in
his usual nonchalant, business-
like manner.
Second to the President in rank,
he quotes his job from the Regents'
By-laws as being: "to exercise
general responsibility for the Uni-
versity's educational program and

t

I .

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

I . . __

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ADATE

'OMORROW?I
Stock up on
the bestgagsin

The stage of Pattengill Auditor-
ium will be animated with char-
acters from Aesop's Fables and the
Nutcracker Suite when the Wash-
tenaw Infirmary Auxiliary spon-
sors two puppet shows at 10:30
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. today.
The Folktale Puppets Studio of
Norwich, Vermont, will present the
two performances.
Several of Aesop's Fables will be
put together to form the first play,
while the second is based on
Tschaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite.
Funds from the ;show will go
towards maintaining the recrea-
tional program at the Washtenaw
Infirmary.
Tickets are 50 cents for adults
and 35 cents for children. They
may be purchased a the door.
FRESHMEN hereby cau-
tion all SOPHOMORES to
either remain at home
Friday night, or if going
out, to travel in a group.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
Campus mailman Arthur Gerst-
ler will acquire a drastic addition
to his route for a three day period
next week.
He will be transported to Wash-
ington D. C., via the Lydia Men-
delssohn stage, where he will de-
liver notices to the Office of Medi-
cinal Herbs in the forthcoming
Student Players production "Two
Blind .Mice."
A NEWCOMER to the grease
paint world, Gerstler literally
walked right into his part. He was
stopped in front of the Chemistry
building one day and offered the
job.
"I guess the fellow had been
watching me," he smiled. "I was
surprised, but not astonished. Up
here anything can happen.-
An affable young man of many
Senior Proofs
Taken Today
Michiganensian picture proofs
will be'1ccepted from 1 to 5 p.m.
today as a special convenience for
seniors unable to bring them in on
weekdays, according to Promotions
Manager Gordon Hyde, '54.
Seniors bringing in their proofs
may make personal portrait or-
ders at the same time, Hyde an-
nounced. The orders are being ac-
cepted on the first floor of the
Student Publications Building.
Next week senior picture proofs
may be returned between 8:30 a.m.
and 5:30 p.m. any week day.
If proofs are not returned with-
in ten days of receipt by the stu-
dent, the 'Ensian staff will make
its own selection of the picture to
appear in the yearbook.

interests, Gerstler decided to go
along with the invitation.t
* * * .
ACTING is one of tne few acti-
vities this native Ann Arborite had
not tried before. A busy resident of
Whitmore Lake, Gerstler is a
member of his district school
board, the head of a cub scout
troop, and on the parent-training
committee for the scouts.
The father of a nine-year old
son, he foresees future work
with the boy scouts as soon as
his boy is old enough to join.
"I have to keep up with him,"
he said.d G
On the artistic side, Gerstler is
also an amateur musician. He
plays both the electric guitar and
the violin!
* * * -
AND ALTHOUGH his job keeps
him on his feet, off hours one
might have to search a long way
up to find him. Gerstler is a pilot,
too, and while some people take
jaunts in the family automobile
Gerstler and his bunch rent a
plane for their pleasure rides.
Gerstler is not at all worried
about his debut.
"I'vehbeen delivering mail for
four years; I'm sure I can handle
the part," he remarked.
The test will come Thursday,
Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.
whenythencurtain will rise on the
Washington office.
Tickets for the performance will
go on sale Monday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn box office. They are
priced at $1 and 74 cents.
IFC Announces
Available Openings
Petitioning is open for two posi-
tions on the newly organized IFC
committee set up to study the anti-
bias measure. .
One position is for a representa-
tive rom afratenity ith ' ds

CINEMA GUILD - "Ivant
Terrible" and a short "Int
Sands of Western Asia" will
shown at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
the Architecture Auditorium
the Cinema Guild.

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Campus
Calendar
Events Today

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in
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NSA ASSEMBLY-The regional
iecutive committee of the Michi-
an regents of the National Stu-
ent Association will meet here to
la na schedule for the regional
ssembly to be held on Nov. 30
nd Dec. 1 and to discuss NSA
rganization.
AUDUBON TOURS -The first
n a series of National Audubon
Screen Tours will be presented by
he Washtenaw Audubon Society
nd the Adult Education Depart-
ment of the Public Schools of Ann
Arbor at 8 p.m. in Pattengill Audi-
orium.
* * *
BEACON - Students from all
he countries of the British Em-
pire and Commonwealth of Na-
ions will have a chance to get ac-
uainted at a picnic sponsored by
he BEACON association. I
After a luncheon at the League
at noon students will spend the
afternoon at the home of Prof.
Hereward T. Price of the English
department.
4 " *
Events Tomorrow
LECTURE - At a communion
breakfast after 9:30 a.m. Mass at
St. Mary's Catholic Church, Prof.
Francis X. Canfield, librarian at
he Sacred Heart Seminary in De-
roit, will speak on Catholic litera-
ure.
HILLEL-Hillel Foundation will
ponsor a Simchas Torah party at
7:30 p.m. at Lane Hall with games,
efreshments, folk singing and
dancing.
Radio Parties
Listening parties will be fea-
tured at both the Union and
the League to hear the broad-
cast of the Michigan - Iowa
game.
Thge 8/8/WI/IhJ

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subjct-Doctrine of Atonement.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.-Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
Ths room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Fridays 7-9
P. M., Saturday 3-5 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Student Center-Corner of Hill & Forest
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services .Zion & Trinity
Churches.
2:30-4:30 P.M.: Community Open House at the
Center-Students welcome. .
5:30 P.M.: LSA Supper Meeting at the Center-
Dr. Yoder and Frank Norman will speak on
their summer experiences in Germany.
Tuesday-
7:30 P.M.: Discussion Group at Center-"What
I Believe."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30rP.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Verduin.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Betty Lou Jockwig, Associate Student Counselor
9:45 A.M.: College class.
11:00 A.M.: Or. John Nevin Sayre, "Christ's Plan
for Peace."
7:00 P.M.: Dr. Slosson "The Relevancy of the
Church to the international Situation.'"
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETINGLane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.

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Coming
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tive from a fraternity with a dis-
criminatory clause, and the other
is for a representative from a fra-b
ternity without a discriminatoryS
clause. The petitions should be de-
livered by 5 p.m. Wednesday tot
the IFC office in the Union. t
Petitions for chairman of thet
IFC Coordinating Committee are
also due at 5 p.m. Wednesday 'in s
the IFC office.
r
R ODisplay Entries d
B EDRYDeadlineMonday
Dormitories and houses plan-
ning to enter homecoming displays
in Saturday'% contest must return
applications to the Student Legis-
lature Building by Monday, ac-
cording to SL member Irv Stenn,_
'51.
Displays will be judged by two
boards of three which will drive
for fall and Home- by the residences in the morning.
Week-end. Long-
I' I
shirt with simulat-
rl buttons and "mi- illAII> I I
Collar . .White,
or coral. 32 to 36. Impatience 1
I I
595 5 Si0i
abiger '
war?

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Discussion Group. "How Can
We Influence Our hildren's Behavior?" E. Scott
Maynes; Chairman. ,
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Services-Rev. Edward H. Redman
on: "The Great Themes of Liberal Religion."
6:30 P.M.: Unitarian Stdent Group "The Qua-
ker Peace Proposals" Dave Leonard, Homer
and Lois Chance.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
Music: Wayne Dunlap, Howard R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: All Departments of Church School
meet.
10:45 A.M.: Public worship. Dr. Parr's subject
will be "The Bi-focals of Faith."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild supper, Memorial
Christian hurch. Speaker, Dr. John Nevin
Sayre, Secretary Fellowship of Recorriliation.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wongdohl,
Eugene Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar, Pine Room.
10:45A.M.: Worship, "Upon What Rock Is Christ
Building His Church?"-Dr. Large preaching.
4:15 P.M.: Bible Study Group, Green Room.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Student
Panel has been formed and fe topic they
will discuss is: "Right or Wrong?"
Welcome to the Wesley Foundation Rooms, open
daily!
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunda yat 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "The Relevancy of the Beatitudes."
Sunday at 4:45: Bible Study.
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Religious Movie.
Tuesday at 9:15: Social Hour.
Wedneseday at 7:00: Choir Rehearsal.
Thursday at 715: Chapel Assembly.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (Nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: "Intelligent Enthusiasm."
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Paterson, Assistant
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 P.M. supper and 6:45
program. Guest speaker, Dr. John NevinSayre,
Secretary of the International Fellowship, of
Reconciliation.
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center Chapel
Willow Run
Reverend Blaise Leval, Pastor
Sunday, October 21st, 1951
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Sermon -- "Meet
Mr. Paul-The Traveller."
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
7:00 P.M.: Free Movie "The Apostle."

..

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.

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YOUNG FRIENDS FELLOWSHIP
Meets Sunday, October 21 at the home of Arthur
Dunham, 1911 Austin. Transportation provided
at Lane Hall at 5:30.
Supper at 5:45, followed by work party to pack
clothes for the American Friend's Service Com-
mittee. Finally, bull session on recent Camp
Mack conference on Pacifism. You are cor-
dially invited.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
218 North Division St. Phone 2-4097
Rev. Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Miss Ada Mae Ames, Counselor for Women
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Nursery - 9th grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Henry Lewis, D.D.

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BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
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