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April 27, 1951 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, APRIL , 1951 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

M'Nine Loos for First

in

Today Against Iow
rkci-Two Winless Squads Meet at Iowa City

*

*

*

*

*

Illini, Boilermaker RacqueteersToT

Gl,

Wolverine Consecutive

Victory Skein

Hetzeck-Bradley Duel Looms
Highlight of Initial League Tilt

PETE AND YOGI:
Father, Coach Key to Palmer's Success

Michigan hits the road for its
first conference tennis action of
the season today and tomorrow
with matches at Illinois and Pur-
due.
The Illini, with a veteran-stud-
ded squad, may well give the Wol-
verines their most rugged test of
the season.
** *
LAST SEASON Michigan defeat-
ed Illinois, 7-2. for one of their
finest dual victories of the season.
But when conference time rolled
around, the Illini used their pow-
There still remain open a
few positions for freshmen in-
terested in becoming sophomore
football managers for the 194
season. If interested, report to
Ferry Field any afternoon after
3:00,
--,Lee Stock
er in the number five and six posi-
tions to shade the Wolverines jor
second position in the champion-
ships.
Captain Al Hetzeck will come
up against his last season's an-
tagonist, smooth-stroking Son-
ny Bradley, in what should be
a great match. Hetzeck beat

Bradley, 6-3, 6-2 in their 1950
meeting.
Two Wolverine first-year varsity
men will face acid tests when Jack
Smart and Gene Barrack meet a
pair of seasoned veterans, Bob
Bennorth and Jim Moses, in the
number three and five singles.
only holdover{
STEVE BROMBERG, Michi-
gan's only holdover other than
Hetzeck, will also face strong op-
position in Gene Buwick, who play-
ed number three last season and
moved up to number two this year.
The Illini have won their only
previous match, an 8-1 conquest
of Washington University of St.
Louis last week.
Michigan's traveling squad, that
left Ann Arbor yesterday for the
long ride to Champaign-Urbana,
consists of Captain Hetzeck, Brom-
berg, Smart, Mike Schwartz, Bar-
rack, and Bob Curhan.
AFTER THE ILLINI clash, the
netmen will move over to West
Lafayette, Ind., tomorrow to meet
Purdue's mediorce aggregation.
The Boilermakers have never been
a power in Big Ten tennis, and are
not figured to stir up much dust
this season.

By GENE MACKEVICH'
Good teaching can, lead to a
success story. *
Pete Palmer, Michigan's number
one catcher for the past two cham-
pionship seasons, attributes a great
deal of his baseball knowledge and
know-how to his two favorite in-
structors: baseball coach Ray Fish-
er and his father, who at one time
was a sports great in his own right.-
* * *
WHEN PETE was attending'
Park High School in Indianapolis,
Ind., his greatest baseball tutor and
most ardent fan was his father,
who, incidentally, was a math
teacher at this boys' school. Pete
received nine high school letters:
three each in baseball, football,
and basketball.
His father constantly guided
him along his baseball career.
"Dad would change me from sec-
ond base to third, and then send
me out Into the outfield," he
said. "But finally, he made a
catcher-out of me. Dad would
always tell me that a team is 1
only as good as its catcher.
"In my sophomore year at Mich-r
igan, coach Ray Fisher picked mec
up and began to make me think

k +k <

ATTENTION MR. CRISLER!

Survey Shows TV

Aids Grid Crowds

v

By E: A. WHIPPLE
"Television of football contests
is good for grid attendance," claim
the boys who "ought to know," the
Radio-Television Manufacturers'
Association.
This organization parlayed a
cash output into a comprehensive
survey called "The Long Range Ef-
fects of Television and Other Fact-
ors on Sports Attendance" which
was published last year, and offers
some eye-opening information to
those who believe that TV slashes
grid crowds.
THE SURVEY concludes that a
higher percentage of schools in
TV areas than in non-TV areas
increased attendance in 1948 in the
Western Conference area. How-
ever, the industrialists charitably
admit that this was probably due
to better performances.
Also, there is no indication

that television hurts small col-
lege or high school attendance.
Of the 31 schools surveyed in
the Midwest TV areas, 20 increas-
ed crowds in 1949, and 11 decreas-
ed. The 17 colleges in the non-TV
sections did equally well-eleven
increased and six decreased.
* * *
HENCE THERE seems to be
little argument for any change in
the unrestrained television of.
games by the Western Conference
in 1949.
However, a slight fly creeps
into the rosy unlimited TV oint-
ment with the survey's declara-
tion that there occurs a tempor-
ary decrease in football attend-
ance by persons in their first
year of television ownership.
But, all is well again after the

novelty wears off, according to the
manufacturers, by showing that
attendance returns to normal in
about one year.
S* * *
AND, HOLD ONTO your lids,
owners of two or more years have
higher attendance than non-own-
ers.
To support these conclusions, a
poll of 3,000 1949 University of
Pennsylvania grid fans revealed
the following: 39 per cent of new
owners go to games frequently; 40
per cent of non-owners, and 46 per
cent of TV owners of more than a
season go to games often.
This temporary loss in attend-
ance among new buyers, indicated
by the public opinion surveys, is
not reflected in national attend-
ance statistics.

ti
c
a
ri
it
b
IA
n
e
p
n
c

PETE PALMER
...veteran backstop
* * *
baseball." Since he has been
"thinking" baseball, Pete has done
rather well for himself as a first
class Wolverine receiver.
* * *
HE ENTERED Michigan in Sep-
tember, 1947. His first year on
campus he won football numerals
and at the decision of his coaches
returned to the gridiron the follow-
ing spring instead of going out for
baseball.
During his sophomore year,
the backstop from Indianapolis
played football, basketball, and
baseball. He held down a varsity
quarterback position in the fall,
and received J-V numerals dur-
ing the basketball season.
In the spring, Palmer finally
went out for baseball. Fisher recog-
nized him as a young, inexperienc-
ed receiver with a great deal of
potentiality. He was promptly
made the team's second string
catcher, behind Harold "Tubby"

Raymond, now football coach at
the University of Maine.
* * *
THE FOLLOWING year he con-
centrated on baseball, which has
always been his favorite , sport.
That season he batted fifth in
the lineup, hit .340-which was
one percentage point behind the
team batting champ, Gerry Dorr-
and had 11 RBI's to his credit.
Now, as a senior, the six foot,
195 pound blond is looking for
his finest Wolverine season. Pal-
mer hopes to be able to improve
on his 1950 rating when he was
selected on the second string all-
Big Ten team.
Pete's greatest sports thrill came
last October when the Wolverines
met Army in Yankee Stadium.
"They led us down a long passage-
way to what I thought would be
some out - of - the - way dressing
room," he began. "But to my com-
plete surprise they assigned us
lockers belonging to the Yankees.
I sat in front of one with the name
of Yogi Berra on it. Yes, Yogi and
I shared the same locker . . . and
he gets $30,000 a year," he con-
cluded.
A "PHYS-ED" MAJOR, Palmer
hopes to become a major leaguer
some day. He maintains that hav-
ing a professional baseball contract
is like getting a doctors degree in
some other profession. When ask-
ed which major league team he
would most like to play for, the big
blond quietly answered: "Any one
of the 16 would be fine."
This year's pitching staff, for
the most part, is young and inex-
perienced. But Coach Fisher is con-
fident that Palmer has learned how
to handle these pitchers well and
as many know, it is the catcher
who is largely responsible for a
pitcher's effectiveness or lack of it.
But Coach Fisher firmly believes
-as do many others-that this
season his pitchers will be in good
hands.

By BOB LANDOWNE Merlin Kurt, a returning sen- Fisher will send Bob Larsen
Victoryless in their curtailed ior, seems to be Coach Otto the mound today to give the ]
initial home stand, Michigan's Vogel's only choice for the first hander his second conferm
baseball squad will invade Iowa base position. start. 'Five other hurlers
City today and tomorrow for a Michigan Coach Ray Fisher al- traveling with the teambut.S
two game series in which both the so has a few problems as indicated urday's starter is still somew
Hawkeyes and the Wolverines will by the recent slumping of. his of a questionmark,
be looking for their first confer- charges,FrnHoelwlgtth
wThird place finishers in 1950, THE INJURY to Al Weygandt in center field and some shuff
Iowa also has an 0-2 record in Big will only add to his woes which will have to be done in case W
Ten play this year as a result of a seem to center around the lack gandt can not play at first.
double loss to Northwestern last of hitting evident in the Illinois Bill Mogk may be Weygar
weekend in Evanston, series when they were able to
* * * gather only- a total of seven hits, replacement, leaving Gil Sabuc
THE HAWKEYES had previ- Weygandt has made the trip second, or Pete Palmer may r
ously lost to the weatherman two to Iowa City but his ability to first giving Line Painter a cha
games with Illinois, twice conquer- start is still doubtful, at handling the catching dutie
ors of Michian.
Iowa has nine returning let-
termen from last year, which.
includes three pitchers, their en- ORUY FOR NOW - OR FOR NEXT FALL
tire outfield, captain and catch-
er John Dinzole, as well as ex-
perienced first and third base-
men.
Their mound corps is led by
grid quarterback, Glenn Drahn,
who had a 4-0 conference record
last year, and he is supported by OUR ENTIRE STOCK
two senior lefthanders, Bruce OF HIGH EST QUAL I TY
Marsh and Dick Orth.
THEIR OUTFIELD is well pa- Topcoats
trolled by a trio of seniors, George
Hand, who bats cleanup, in left,
Rex Vana in center and Charlie
Cebuhar in right.
2&0%
The latter two have been con-
siderably weak at the plate so
far this year and may be re--OFF
placed by Duane Brandt who is
batting .370 to date and Frank REG. $35
Bok, occasionally used against COATS . [.
lefthanded pitching.*'*
Though the Hawkeyes lost star REG. $45
second baseman Jack Dittmer, COATS
they still can field a strong in- CA . -
field by moving last year's short-
stop, Bob Christoph, to third and REG. $55
moving in Tom Stenger at short, COATS .... .
STENGER was a utility man
last year and will probably be aid-
ed at the keystone sack by Jack U
Hess who is batting .313, consider-
ably higher than Herold Greene, 217 East Liberty Phone 2080
another second base possibility.

I

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