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April 27, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-27

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SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1951

Figers Purchase Bearden
[o Strengthen Relef Staff

Truckmen Travel
Squad of 13 Represents'M
In Des Mioines:Meet Today1
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DETROIT -- (A')-- Handsome
Gene Bearden, whose story-book
exploits won a pennant for the
Cleveland Indians, will now try his
hand at helping the Detroit
Tigers.
The big left-handed knuckleball
pitcher, who was bought yester-
:ay by Detroit from the Washing-
ton Senators for an undisclosed
price, will join the Tigers imme-
diately.
BEARDEN, 30, unimpressive
this spring in exhibition and
league games, will become the Ti-
gers' fourth left-hander.
"I plan to use him as a relief
pitcher and a starter at certain
spots," said Manager Red Rolfe.
Rolfe's left-handed corps al-
ready includes starters Hal New-
houser and Ted Gray and relief-
er Earl Johnson.
"I don't know exactly what
Bearden's trouble has been," said
Rolfe. "But I think he'll be able
to help us."
IF BEARDEN ever attained his
1948 form he definitely would help
the Tigers, who won only two of
their first six games this season.
Last year they finished second in
the American League.
In 1948 with the Cleveland
Indians Bearden was the rookie
sensation of the American
League. He won 20 games and
lost only 7.
Bearden, whose earned run av-
erage of 2.43 was the league's best

that season, had been wounded in
World War II, Service doctors had
told him he would never be able
to play baseball again,
THE COMEBACK kid really be-
came Cleveland's idol when he
hurled the Indians to an 8-3 win
over the Boston Red Sox in a post-
season playoff game after the
clubs tied for first place.
But the next season he was
plagued by wildness and won
only eight and lost eight. After
winning one and losing three
for Cleveland early last season,
Bearden was sent to Washing-
ton on waivers.
With the Senators he won three
and lost five and compiled aft
earned run average of 4.17.
* * * .
THIS YEAR he was hit hard in
exhibitions. The New York Yan-
kees tagged him for six hits and
two walks in his first league ap-
pearance this season. He lasted
only two -and two-thirds innings.
It was reported in Washing-
ton that Bearden has been
bothered by a sore 'arm.
Bearden is expected to be on
hand when the Tigers, who have
been idlb since beating St. Louis
Monday, resume action tomorrow
against the Chicago -White Sox
here in Briggs Stadium.
Rolfe said he planned to start
Gray tomorrow and Newhouser
Sunday in the second game of the
Chicago series.

ners Clear Last Obstacle
To Prompt Chandler Ouster

By BYRLE ABBIN
Still suffering from lack .of con-
ditioning due to complete adverse
weather conditions, a thirteen man
Maize and Blue track squad will
represent the Wolverines in one of
the biggest outdoor relay meets of
the season, the Drake Relays, this
afternoon and tomorrow.
Three, possibly four, relay teams
and four individual competitors
wil carry Michigan's hopes at the
Des Moines classic.
A SERIOUS pulled muscle in the
lower calf of Al Rankin, top Wol-
verine quarter-miler, has put a big
crimp in the relay operations. Ran-
kin suffered the mishap just after
the midway mark in the 440 yard
dash at the Southern Cal, Illinois,
Michigan Triangular last Satur-
day.
Rankin will be definitely lost
to the squad for at least three
weeks, possibly four. Coach Don
Canham has expressed deep con-
cern over Rankin, who was an
important cog in the mile relay
and also the distance medley re-
lay.
The Canadian dashman got off
Franklin Field
Site of Famed
Penn Relays
PHILADELPHIA -VP) - Some
3,000 athletes from 500 colleges
and schools will romp over Frank-
lin Field tomorrow and Saturday
in the Penn Relays' 89 events but
the focal race will be an interna-
tional assault on the carnival's
mile mark.
The race for the Benjamin
Franklin Challenge Cup will bring
together Oxford medical student
Roger Bannister, heralded as the
British Empire's best miler since
Jack Lovelock; National AAU in-
door champion Fred Wilt; four-
time National Collegiate AAU
champion Don Gehrmann and the
fast starting Lt. Stew Ray,.
The quartet of speedsters will
be out to better Glenn Cunning-
ham's relay mark of 4:11.8 made
in 1934.
The mile will take place during
the streamlined phase of the Sat-
urday program. In the space of
three hours, all events will be
either American championship re-
lays or finals of invitation fea-
tures.

his crutches the last few days and
has been taking walking exercises
trying to mend his leg back into
condition in time for the outdoor
conierence meet to be held May 25,
26.
* * *
THIS AFTERNOON two events
are being entered by Michigan, the
four mile relay and the broad
jump.
Del Hyde, Dan Hickman,
Doug Parks, and Don McEwen
wil make up the team composed
of four milers. Ron Soble, who
came through in great style with
a leap of 26' 63" in last week's
triangular will represent Michi-
gan in the broad jump.
Tomorrow -the distance medley
relay foursome, which set the
world's record indoors this year,
will try for outdoor laurels but
will have its, membership quite
differently composed this time.
Joe LaRue is taking Rankin's place
in the 440 yard leg, and George
Jacobi will probably run the half
mile.
JACOBI is taking Chuck Whit-
eaker's place. Whiteaker also has
been botherd with pulled muscle
trouble. Aaron Gordon and Mc-
Ewen will run their usual three-
quarter mile and mile legs respec-
tively.
Captain Don Hoover, Wally
Atchison, Jim Mitchell, and Van
Bruner will compose the shuttle
hurdle/ relay team. Hoover and
Mitchell also will enter the High
Hurdles competition.
Freshman John Ross, who has
established himself as a top dis-
tance runner in indoor competition
this year, is entering the Invita-
tional Mile. His top competition
will be a Purdue frosh, Dennis Jo-
hansen, whose home originally was
in Finland.
* * *
THE OTHER possible Michigan
entrant will be the two mile Re-
lay quarter, with, personnel; the
same as the four mile relay team.
Main competition in the relay
events is expected from Michi-
gan State College, Kansas, Okla-
homa, Oklahoma A & M, and
the University of Arkansas.
One of the feature events of the
meet will be the pole vault compe-
tition between Don Laz of Illinois
and Don Cooper of Nebraska.

NEW YORK - () Baseball's
executive council yesterday clear-i
ed the path for the immediate
resignation of Commissioner A. B.
(Happy) Chandler by yielding to
his demand' that the secretary-
treasurer of baseball, Walter Mul-
bry, go out at the same time.
The decision .was reached after
a lengthy meeting between Chan-
dler and John Galbreath, presi-
dent of the Pittsburgh club and an
emissary of the council, it was
learned from a highly authorita-
tive source. The two talked for
more than five hours last Satur-
day in Cincinnati.
GALBREATH, whose mission
was to "get Chandler to resign
immediately," returned with the
following Chandler ultimatum:

SAFE AT FIRST-Gerry Priddy, Detroit Tigers' second baseman,
slides safely back to first base as St. Louis Browns' First Baseman
Joe Lutz tries to make the putout in the first inning of game
played in Briggs Stadium earlier this week. Tigers won, 7-4.
MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:

Boston Rallies To Top Yankees, 13m7

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ANN ARBOR CUT RATE
113 South Main

By The Associated Press
BOSTON-The Boston Red Sox
outlasted the New York Yankees
yesterday, winning a 13-7 contest
which required three hours and
30 minutes. The 19,120 shivering
spectators saw a total of 20 bases
on balls and 22 hits splashed
around Fenway Park.
The victory was Boston's first
over New York in three games and
cracked a Yankee winning string
of four.
Billy Goodman, league bat-
ting champion in 1950, led the
sox slugging with four hits and
three runs batted in.
The game, though ragged, was
very close until the home half
of the eighth when the sox, who
led by an 8-7 count to that point,
broke loose for five additional runs.
Ellis Kinder, veteran reliever,
received "ie credit for the vic-
tory. He was the only hurler
who pitched well. The right
hander entered the action in the
fifth inning and shut off a Yan-
kee rally. He allowed only two
singles from there to the finish.
Casey Stengel, leading the
champion again after a day in the
hospital with a kidney ailment,
called on four pitchers and none;
delivered for him. Tommy Byrne,I

the starter, left after the second
inning by which time he had
walked four men. Allie Reynolds
came on and lasted until the sixth,
when the home side scored four.
runs through two walks and three
hits and took the 8-7 edge.
Harry Taylor, Boston starter,
was nailed for a three-run homer
by Byrne in the second and was
knocked out in the following inn-
ing when New York gained three
more runs.
SENATORS 2, A's 1
WASHINGTON - Washington
moved into a first place with
Cleveland tonight by defeating
Philadelphia 2-1, on the one-hit
pitching of Connie Marrero, and
home runs by Mickey Vernon and
Gil Coan.
The only hit off Marrero was
Barney McCosky's fourth inning
home after Marrero had retired
the first 10 A's in order.
Vernon blasted Joe Coleman
for a homer in the second inn-
ing, but McCosky tied it up and
that situation existed until Coan
smashed his homer with two out
in the seventh.
The triumph was Marrero's sec-
ond in as many starts.
PHILLIES 2, BUCS 0
PHILADELPHIA - The Phila-
delphia Phillies made only three
hits last night, one off Cris Van
Cuyk in seven innings and two off
Clem Labine in one, but they whip-
ped the Brooklyn Dodgers 2-0 be-
hind the fine eight-hit pitching of
Robin Roberts.
The victory was the fifth
straight for the Phillies and left
the defending national league
champions tied for the lead with
the idle St. Louis Cardinals.
Eddie Sawyer's men used one of
their three hits to score their first
run in the third and the other two
for the second tally in the eighth.

BRAVES 3, GIANTS 0
NEW YORK-Two home runs
in the eighth inning gave the Bos-
ton Braves. a 3-0° win over the
lew York Giants as Roy Hart-
field and Sam Jethroe cracked
round trippers to give the Bean-
towners the win.
The loss was the ninth straight
for the Giants, who were a pre-
season favorite for the National
League pennant.
Johnny Sain won his 100th ma-
jor league game by scattering six
Giant hits, ruining Sal Maglie's
34th birthday party.
Hartsfield's homer sailed over
the head of center fielder Bobby
Thomson who apparently mis-
judged the long drive that land-
ed on the cinder path in deep
center. Sain, awarded first on.
interference by catcher Wes
Westrum, scored ahead of Harts-
field on the homer.
Jethroe followed with a line
drive homer into the lower right
field stands, his fifth of the sea-
son.
KELL READY
DETROIT-George Kell, hard-
hitting Detroit Tiger third base-
man, took the splint off his in-
jured finger today and said he
was ready to play again.
After Kell, whose finger was
broken in March, took part in
batting practice Manager Red
Rolfe said he would decide to-
day when Kell would return to
the lineup.
"I think he's still favoring the
hand a bit," said Rolfe, who may
hold him out of the Saturday and
Sunday series with Chicago and
start him Tuesday against Phila-
delphia.
The Tigers won only two of six
games this season without the ser-
vices of Kell, second leading hit-
ting in the American League last
year.

"I'll go only if Mulbry goes."
Neither Chandler- nor any
member of the four-man execu-
tive council would discuss the
reported decision.
Once close friends, Chandler
and Mulbry became bitter enem-
ies in the course of the uproar dur-
ing the winter in which the 16
major league club owners voted
not to renew Chandler's contract.
Since then, the owners have been
trying, without success, to buy up
Happy's $65,000-a-year pact which
does not expire until April 30, 1912,
CHANDLER, who accused Mul-
bry of being instrumental in his
ouster last December and again
the following March, had laid a
charge of "disloyalty" on his for-
mer side-kick. After learning of
his fate following the 'Miami
Beach meeting of the owners on
March 12, the former Kentucky
Governor and Senator made this
plea:
"Give me the satisfaction of
firing Mulbry before I leave of-
fice."
Under the major league agree-
ment, the commissioner appoints
the $30,000-a-year secretary, who
continues in office at the pleasure
of the executive council. This
means that Chandler, who got
Mulbry the job soon 'after he
named commissioner in April,
1945, could not fire him.
* * *
WHEN INFORMED of Chand-
ler's request, Mulbry immediately
offered his resignation to the ex-
ecutive council. It was refused.
Mulbry then disclosed he had tried
to resign as far back as December,
before the first Chandler repudia-
tion, but was asked to stay.
Reached in Cincinnati, Mulbry
said today he had stayed in his job
at the specific request of the ex-
ecutive council.
Major
League
Standings

4

. .

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

The link is strong
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Cleveland
Washington
New York
Chicago
Boston
Detroit
St. Louis
Philadelphia

W L
6 1
6 1
6 3
5 3
4 4
2 4
2 7
1 9

Pct.
.857
.857
.667
.625
.500
.333
.222
.100

GB
..
..
1
211
5

A.

TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Boston
Philadelphia at Washington (night)
(Only games scheduled)
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE

- Today's Special.
Deep Fried Canadian White Fish
Frenci) Fries Salad

St. Louis
Philadelphia
Boston
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Brooklyn
Cincinnati
New York

W L
4 2
6 3
7 4
4 3
4 3
5 4
2 6
2 s

Pct.
.667
.667
.636
.571
.571
.556
.250
.182

GB
4.
3

A.

Vegetable
*Rolls and Butter
75c

Tea or Coffee

TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at New York
Brooklyn at Philadelphia
St. Louis at Chicago
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
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