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April 25, 1951 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-25

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THE M1Cti1GAPN DAILY

AraiL Za, 1951

1

Stylists Give
Smooth Lines
To Sportswear
Soft Denim Featured
In Feminine Shades
Of Violet, Lime, Pink
By MAXINE RYCKMAN
Designers have come a long way
since Grandmother's day when
"play" clothes must have been
more amusing to the spectator
than the wearer.
Today play clothes, far from be-
ing bulky and unattractive, are
trim and flattering..I
* *
EVEN DENIM has gone femin-
ine. An example of this is the
~new soft, crease-resistant denim
which comes in violet, lime, grey,
cream, pink and white.
The fabric is being shown in
a sun dress fashioned with a
cape collar and also in an as-
sortment of blouses, shorts, hal-
ters, skirts and pedal pushers.
These may be combined to make
a number of ensembles either in
matching or contrasting Colors.
Another sportswear designer has
combined denim with Scotch plaid
in slacks, shirts, shorts and skirts.
* * *
MATCHING BAGS, sandals and
caps are also available i plaid
and denim for the woman who
likes every part of her costume
'to look as though 'it "belongs,"
whether she is dressing for a tea
or an outing.
Knee britches modelled after
a toreador's are making their
appearance on the feminine
sportswear scene. They are be-
ing shown with a long jacket
shirt which has patch pockets
and a wide belt.
The jacket may be worn loosely
or belted. It makes an ideal gar-
ment to wear over bathing suits,
shorts, slacks and pedal-pushers,
as well as over britches,
* * * *
SU DRESSES now come in
such a variety of designs and ma-
terials that they double as every-
thing from afternoon dresses to
around-the-house dresses.
An example of the more cas-
ual type is a halter and wrap-
around dress with a Jacket.
This dress folds flat for easy
packing and laundering.
Nylon sun-dresses are often
suitable for luncheon or afternoon
engagements and they, too, have
the advantage of packing and
laundering easily.
Basic Wardrobe
A basic wardrobe for all-year-
round enjoyment includes only
five items, declares a leading fa-i
shion writer. The basic clothes in-
clude: a soft warm coat, a skirt'i
and blouse, knitted dress, printede
crepe, and a shirtwaist dress.

SURF, SAND STYLES:,,
Swim Suit Fashion Designers
To Stress Lace Cotton Prints
Details to Give Slim, Feminine Silhouette
Ir Bright Colors, Long-Nearing Fabrics

SWIM SUITS HINDERED SPORTS:
Early Bathing Beauties Rendered Immobile
With Cumbersome Styles at Turn of Century

By ATHENA SAVAS
Spring and its bright sunny days
turn the fashion world's spotlight
to thoughts of summer swimming
and bathing suits.
This season, bathing suit fash-
ions are stressing laces and lace
prints for the beach or pool scene.
Some are so skillfully designed that
with a full skirt worn over them,
they are transformed into a day
sun dress or evening dress.
OTHER SUITS of lace printed
cottons, lace overlay on gold or
silver are also new. These laces
are practical as well as startling.
They take to swimming and active
play wear as well at to the water.
In fabrics, nylon and silk vel-
vets lead in elegance. Dull fin-
ished all elastic suits with defi-
nite surface interest are fea-
tured. Many weaves of quick
drying nylons or elasticized fab-
rics' are also popular again.
The one-piece suit, worn with or
without the straps will predomi-
nate along the sandy beaches, ac-
cording to some designers. They
have tried new tricks to make the
suits fit the extra tall or extra
short person with equal comfort.
S * * *
MANY of the swim suits depart
from the strictly classic lines to
give a more feminine approach
through details. The slim silhouette
predominates. Black lace patterns
on nude cotton or taffeta give a
peek-a-boo effect.
Cotton laces against the back-
ground of solid fabrics in a vari-
ety of high shades chart the
color course for the coming sea-
son.
Three outstanding colors are
coral, lilac, and turquoise. They
appear in every type of fashion
from beach to ballroom. Close be-
hind this trio are caviar gray, lime,
and yellow.
ONE DESIGNER features a lux-
urious suit of silk velvet with side
panels and detailsin cut velvet over
natural nylon sheer. The back
of the suit is shirred.
Another light as a feather one-
piece suit is made of nylon lastex
lace. Its slender sheath style fea-
tures an hour glass shaped panel
in the front and back. The suit
is plainly styled but the effect is
neat.
One glamorous suit combines
cotton lace over a skin-tone sheath.
The two materials are shirred to-'
gether with elastic thread.
* * *
A THREE YARD REBOZO of
matching lace may be worn over
the shoulders while in the sun, or
it may be worn with a dress for an
evening dance or party.l
A popular beach ensemble in-

cludes a Chantilly lace pattern
printed in black on a soft cotton
in pastel blue, flesh, or white. A
matching coat is reversible and
lined with terry cloth.
A dry-off -and cover-up garment
to be worn just after coming from
the water, is styled of terry cloth.
A detachable hood and midriff of
satin dyed to match the terry
cloth adds to the atractiveness of
the outfit.
The outfit is one that is useful
not only on the beach but also for
lounging at home or in the back-
yard.
Health Experts
Suggest Steps
To Safe Tan's
By SHEILA COHEN
With the coming of warm wea-
ther and bright sunshine, many
coed's minds appropriately turn to
that often beautifying and lazy
sport of sun bathing.
Students eagerly await the day
when the "lucky ole sun" is out in
full force and there are no after-
noon classes in store.
* * ;*

By JANICE JAMES
When one takes a look at the
sports ensembles worn at the turn
of the century, it appears that the
women of that era either had no
athletic prowess, or if they did
they did not dare to display it.
The maJority of the time, they
were so wrapped up in skirts, long
sleeved blouses and hose, that it
is hard to imagine one of these
"Gibson Girls" ever attempting a
dive off the high board at the local
swimming pool.
* *
PERHAPS they did not dive,
but they did go to the beach. Of
course, the results could not have
been too promising, because their
swim suits were a far cry from
the abbreviated versions popular
nowadays.

Then when milady went to
the beach she took enough
equipment with her to last for a
four week trip. For the jaunt
to the shore the proper costume
consisted of a long linen duster
which reached from the chin to
the ankles.
To prevent the sun frpm reach-
ing madame's fair complexion, a
hat with a brim of tremendous 'di-
mensions was perched atop the
head. Around this' was worn a
veil which tied under the chin and
completely covered the .face.
* * *
SPEAKING 'of milady's head,
this part of the anatomy was
topped by a mass of hair which.
probably had never been touched
by barber's shears. Buns of any

Plenty o Recreation Available
To Amuse Sunmer Students
League, Nearby Parks, Beaches Provide
Varied Entertainment To Fill Leisure Time

WITH HOMEWORK forgotten,
coeds don bathing suits or shorts,
and with blankets in hand, head
for back lawns or roofs.
While the sunbather is broil-
ing, visions of beautiful cottop
dresses shown off to their best
advantage with a smooth, even
tan, may dance through her
head.
But if she stays out too long her
visions will vanish and a lobster-
red complexion will replace the
hoped-for tan.
HEALTH authorities warn that
a large dose of sunshine can lead
to drastic resultstnamely a pain-
ful burn or sun stroke.
Many beauty experts recom-
mend ten to fifteen minutes the
first day with a slow and gradu-
al increase each time.
Early morning hours or late aft-
ernoon hours are regarded as the
best times for sunbathing. At
these times the sun is not at its
strongest, and will not be so likely
to leave the sun bather with that
"par boiled" look.
"We warn women to take their
sun baths very gradually," said Dr.
Margaret Bell, chairman of the
women's physical education de-
partment and physician at Health
Service. "Each year we see a num-
ber of cases of second degree burns
from over-exposure," she added.

DOUBLE DUTY-This tartan plaid bathing suit is suitable for
either swimming or sunning because of its fast-drying and wrinkle-
shed cotton composition. It is styled with a halter top and romper
bottom to give it the youthful look desired in swim suits. The skirt,
made with a deep flounce, is detachable. The beach bag is almost
a necessity for carting towels, sun tan lotion and bathing caps to
the beach. It comes in colors complimentary to the swim suit.
DIFFERENT DRESSES:
New Ideas Influence Cottons
By TRUDY KRAVIS ing dresses with both covered
Dress designers are featuring and uncovered shoulders.
plaids, vivid colors, gold prints, Many of this year's skirts are
and embroidered materials in their full and softly pleated. In con-
new cotton dresses for spring and trast to the fullness a small waist-
summer. I line will be emphasized.
The Scotch influence present in * * *
the winter wool plaids has been LIGHTWEIGHT sweaters in,

By JO KE'IZHV
Contrary to popular opinion sum-
mer school is not a continuous cir-
cle of textbooks, air-conditioned
movies and solitaire.
With a little ingenuity and in-
quiry, plenty of entertainment and
recreation can be found to take
care of those lazy afternoon and
empty evening hours.
Summer is practically a syno-
nym for swimming and there are
many lakes within easy driving
or hard hoofing distance from
Ann Arbor.
S* s
SILVER LAKE has been one of
the most popular places for sun-
bathers and swimmers among the
college crowd for many seasons.
Perhaps its strongest attraction
is the free public bathing beach
and picnic tables. A well-stocked
concessions stand is open during
the day to provide refreshments
between water games and naps in
the sun.
Two public beaches at Whit-
more Lake provide lockers, wa-
ter slides and ddeks for small
fees..
Many of the small sail boats
which are seen skimming along
the lake in the summer belong to
the University's Sailing Club which
summer school students may join.
* * *
CLEAR LAKE, located near
Jackson, offers a county park, a
swimming beach and a view of
rustic outdoor life, for there are
three camps located on the lake.
Another nearby recreational
spot well-known to summer
school students is Portage Lake,
which is also located near Jack-
son. In addition to its public
beach, the lake has been a popu-
lar one in the past for its rent-
ed cottages.
Miniature. golf, speedboats, a
midway and a large dance hall are
found at Walled Lake, where
crowds throng for evening fun in
the summertime. Big name bands
are often scheduled for the dances
which are held every night of the
week except Monday.

FOR THOSE who wish to take
longer trips for entertainment on
the week-ends, there are visits to
the larger lakes on the other side
of Michigan, the Irish Hills, the
zoo at Royal Oak and the amuse-
ments in Detroit.
Also contrary to often-voiced
opinion, the sidewalks in Ann
Arbor do not roll up at 8 p.m. in
the summertime and there is
always plenty of evening enter-
tainment which can be found
not far from the campus.
Night softball g'ames, concerts,
drama at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, student religious gather-
ings, bridge tournaments, square
dances, bowling and picnics 'in the
Arb and Island Park are just a
few of the amusements which can
be found after textbooks are
closed for the evening.
DANCING ENTHUSIASTS will
haveglittle cause to worry about
losing their smooth techniques
during the summer. They will
have an opportunity to keep in
step at the League 'dances which
are held from 9 p.m. to midnight
in the ballroom every Friday and
Saturday nights. Students may
attend the dances with or without
dates.
Sports facilities are available
at many of the city parks for
afternoon and early evening rec-
reation.
Burns Park, located on Wells.
Street offers four tennis courts,
horseshoe pits, two softball dia-
monds, archery and, volleyball
equipment and picnic tables for,
relaxation from -classes. Wines
Field and West Park are two other
places which offer similar recrea-
tional facilities.
A variety of play schedules can
be planned for almost every day
of the eight-week summer session.
They may include canoeing on the
Huron River, golfing on the Mu-
nicipal or University course, swing-
ing a tennis racquet on the Burns
Park, Yost Field or WAB court or
horseback riding at one of the
stables near Ann Arbor.
Biking fans will have an op-
portunity during the summer to
travel around the city via wheels
and view parts of Ann Arbor whichI
they have never seen.1

number and size were wound
around the head at any and all
angles, and covered by a hat at
almost every opportunity.
Once at the beach, milady
quickly retired to the dressing
room, and when she made her
appearance on the beach, there
didn't seem to be too muchdif-
ference in her attire.
True, the skirt was a little short-
er, but what it had formerly cov-
ered was still hidden, only now
bloomers reaching to the knees,
and long black hose finished the
camouflage job.
* * *
THEN, to add to the confusion,
milady donned a pair of high
topped sho'es, which, even if they
did weight her down, certainly did
not allow her feet to get even the
slightest bit wet!
Still guarding her complexion,
the woman of the 1900's tucked
her lengthy locks beneath a cap,
and she could always be spotted
strolling down the' beach twirl-
ing her gayly colored parasol.
Once milady had made her ap,
pearance on the beach, she:strictl9
adhered to fashion, and never
"went near the water." If she did,
she quickly retreated, and thus,
we are still left in the dark as to
the athletic prowess of the women
of those years "not so long ago."
SocialSeason
To Be Varied
This Summer
By TULA DIAMOND
Summer school at Michigan
each year is known for its social
as well as intellectual activities.
Taking time off from books,
summer school students may en-
joy the many varied activities
which the League has planned.
The summer social committee has
three traditional activities which
are carried out every summer:
square dancing, ballroom dancing
and bridge.
The Friday and Saturday night
weekly dances were considered
very successful last year. Friend-
liness and informality are typical
of all of these activities.
The summer social season of-
ficially closes with a big informal
dance. Last year, the annual
"Beach Ball" climaxed the
League's series of summer dances.
For those interested in journa-
lism, The Daily offers many op-
portunities. Because of the ex-
pected shortage of mei.this sum-
mer, women will have an even
greater opportunity to prove their
skill in newspaper work.
The summer season is going to
be a busy one, because SL and the
University also sponsor a dance.
Last year's was a grewt success.
Newt Loken, gymnastic coach
provided entertainment by pre-
senting a program of trampoline
antics during the intermission.
The Speech Department always
provides students with a vailet
of plays which are of educational,
as well as entertainment value.
Summer Suits
Summer suits are the thing for
working women and travelers.
Though light as a breeze and light
in color, they still have all the
tailored trimmness of winter class-
ics. Another fact in their favor is
that they are inexpensive-with
most of them running under $25.

At

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carried over into summer cottons.
Jewels in the form of rhinestone
buttons and pearls will adorn many
cotton dresses. Jewelry may be
worn on the shoulders of the dress,
near the neck or down the front.
* * *
COTTON, SATIN, chambray,
broadcloth, pique and linen are
popular summer materials. Laun-
dering will not be so difficult with
these easy-to-wash-and-iron fab-
rics.
Many dresses have "diminish-
ed" sleeves which leave the arms
bare. Designers are also creat-

colors to match the dress are at-f
tractive and comfortable for cool
summer nights and spring after-
noons. A sundress with matching
bolero can also be a practical
part of the summer wardrobe.
Many new blouses and skirts
are being shown in bright color
combinations to complement a
summer tan. Local stores are
featuring these separates.
There was a time when only
sport dresses were made of cot-
ton. Today stylists are also creat-
ing. dressy dresses in cotton ma-
terial.

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