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September 26, 1950 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*AGE FOURTEEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER "28, 1954

?AGE FOU1tTEKN TTYESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1950

l ',

Student Decorators in All-Out Effort

.---

Fresh from a variety of summer
occupations, students returned to
campus to face the perennial au-
tumnal job of decorating their
rooms.

Would-be interior decorators in
fraternity houses, residence halls
and apartments struggled with
hammer and nail, paint and brush
all last week in an effort to

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GIFTS & NOVELTIES

broghten up their quarters before
classes opened.
Reports indicated that most of
the major work had been com-
pleted by the time Burton Tower
announced the first eight o'clock
class of the semester. However,
some students were still hard at it
last night as thirsty plaster and
bone-dry woodwork continued to
soak in the paint.
* * *
Paint stores reported near rec-
ord sales and some odd requests.
One dealer recalled a coed who
came in to purchase two quarts of
chartreuse and vermilion for one
wall of her apartment early in the
registration period.
Two days later, the dealer re-
ported, she returned and bought
twow gallons of each { color, ex-
plaining that she liked it so well,
she was going to do the whole
apartment in the same colors.
Be it ever so humble, students
were determined that the year's
lodgings would be no place 11 k e
nom e.

'U' To Hold'
Conference
On Education
Educators from all over the state
will flock to Ann Arbor this week
as the University's Bureau of
School Services sponsors a con-
ference of school board members
and school officials.
Lee Thurston, state superintend-
ant of public instruction, and
State Senator Don VanderWerp
will be featured speakers. The
conference is scheduled for Thurs-
day.
After Thurston and Vander-
Werp deliver morning addresses,
the conference will break up into
eight discussion groups during the
afternoon and conclude with a
dinner session in the evening. This
closing session will be addressed
by Edward M. Tuttle, executive
secretary of the National School
Board Association, who will speak
on "Whose Business is Public Ed-
ucation?"

Special reduced student rates
are being offered for Oratorical
Association lecture series tickets
this year, for the first time.
Students may purchase season
tickets at $2.40 for unreserved se-
cond balcony seats, and hear such
headliners as David Lilienthal,
Charles Laughton, Lowell Thomas
Jr., and Bennett Cer'f.
* * *
THIS OFFER will include the
entire series for the price of two
single balcony admissions, and a
box office announcement indi-
cated that the bargain offer is go-
ing fast.-
Dynamic David Lilientlhal will
lead off the series this semester
on Oct. 18 with a lecture on
"Atomic Energy for' Peace."
Charles Laughton will be heard
on Nov. 1 in a series of dramatic
dialogues titled, "An Evening with
Charles Laughton."
On Nov, 7, Lowell Thomas, Jr.

will show color motion pictures of
his famous Tibetan t r ip.
"Out of This World: A Journey to
Lhas" will illustrate the pilgrim-
age made by Thomas Sr. and Jr
s " *
WILLIAM LAURENCE, noted
physicist, will discuss "The Truth
About the Hydrogen Bomb," Jan.
16. John Mason Brown, perennial
Ann Arbor favorite will hit the
highlights of current literature
when he discusses, "Seeing More
Things," on March 7.
Julien Bryan will wind up the
series with colored motion pictures
on "England in a Changing
World," March 15.
Season tickets, both regular and
special student rates will be avail-
able at the Hill Auditorium box
office, open -daily from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and from 2 to 5 p.m.
from Sept. 18 to Oct. 18: Main
floor season tickets are $7.80, first
balcony $6.60.

Student Rates Offered
For Oratorical Series

Since
1908

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MURL K. ATEN
State 'Auditor Calls for
Clear Financial Reports

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TEXT OKS

By AL CONNABLE
Public ignorance of state finan-
cial conditions resulting from
party disputes can be greatly re-
duced by clear, condensed, annual
reports, Murl K. Aten, Michigan's
Auditor General, told a forum on
annual reports in the business ad-
ministration school last Thurs-
day.4
Aten and Harry A. McDonald,
Chairman of the Securities and
Exchange Commission, were fea-
tured speakers at the meeting
which attracted business men from
all over Michigan.
* * t
THE AUDITOR GENERAL said
that annual reports on Michigan's
financial operations were avail-
able to all citizens.
McDonald spoke in the morn-
ing session along with Samuel
J. Broad, partner in a New York
brokerage firm. Prof. William A.
Paton of the accounting depart-
ment presided over this session.
McDonald presented the view-
point of the investor regarding an-
nual reports, explaining that the
function of the SEC is to safe-
guard the interests of the investors
and would-be investors. He stated
that there was a need for uniform-
ity and objectivity in company re-
ports.
BROAD VIEWED the presenta-
tion of the annual firm statements
from the standpoint of the public
accountant. He opposed freezing
of accounting principles and pro-

cedures, calling for their adapta-
tion to changing economic prob-
lems and conditions.
The luncheon session, at
which Aten spoke, was presided
over by Dean Russell A. Steven-
son of the business administra-
tion school.
During the afternoon session,
two speakers presented more de-
tailed analyses of the techniques
of preparing annual reports.
Alfred T. Joldersr-a, treasurer
of the Detroit Harvester Co., re-
lated his firm's experiences in the
field of presenting stockholders
and employes with readable and
accurate financial information.
Joldersma emphasized that the re-
ports should be intelligently com-
piled and free of editorial com-
ment.
LAST SPEsAKER of the day was
Samuel E. MacArthur, controller
of the Federal-Mogul Corp. He
presented a series of slides show-
ing the results of a survey he had
made of 142 annual reports.
Presiding officer during the
concluding session was John C.
Beukema, Secretary-Manager of
the Greater Muskegon Chamber
of Commerce.

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