100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 26, 1950 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBERe 20; 1950

THE MICHIGTAN D A TTV

PAGE THIRTEEN

aaa.u 1raa Vaa8Vn1 Lt1Y1 1

MUSIC GROUPS GALORE:
'U' Bands, Choruses Begin Rehearsals

ID Cards O 8 in eCOT Ie

Musical opportunity - the
chance to participate in group re-
hearsals and concerts--is knock-
ing at the door of every Univer-
sity student who has the talent
Yand the inclination to sing or
play a musical instrument.
Most of the four University
choirs, three bands, two orches-
tras, two glee clubs and the Chor-
al Union will begin rehearsals this
week. Several of the groups al-
ready have started practice.
MEMBERSHIP IN these or-
ganizations is open to all students
on campus.
The choirs, the University
Choir, the Arts Chorale, the
Michigan Singers and the Tu-
der Singers, are under the di-
rection of Prof. Maynard Klein,
of the School of Music.
Designed to make serious chor-
Welcome Back
to
lMicliigan !
It's the same old location, but
redecorated.
'We still have "Butch", Ginny,
Andy, and Tom to serve you,
but we're a year older and
more experienced.
It's still Fraternity and Col-
lege Jewelry, but hundreds of
new items and designs.
Stop in and say "Hello"-We
won't try to sell you a thing.
L. G. Balfor Co.
1319 South University
Phone 3-1733
Home of the
Official Michigan Ring

ale singing available to as many
students as possible, the choirs
rehearse at different times during
the week.
* s
UNIVERSITY CHOIR meets at
3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wed-
nesday, the Arts Chorale from 7 to
9 p.m. Wednesday and the Michi-
gan Singers from 3 to 5 p.m.
Thursdays. Members of the Tudor
Singers are chosen from the com-
panies of the other three groups.
Students interested in parts-
cipating should come to the re-
hearsals to arrange for a tryout
audition, according to Prof.
Klein.
University Choir concerts are
scheduled for Nov. 16 and Dec. 14
in Hill Auditorium. An Arts
Chorale concert is planned for
Dec. 2 also in Hill. The Michigan
Singers will present a concert
Dec. 12 in Lydia Mendelssohn.
FOR THE student who plays a
musical instrument and desires
symphonic experience there are
the University Symphony Or-
chestra and the Repertory Orches-
tra, both under the baton of Di-
rector Wayne Dunlap.
Rehearsals of the Symphony Or-
chestra are held at 3 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday at Harris
Hall. The first public perform-
ance, a special children's concert,
is scheduled for Oct. 18 in Hill
Auditorium.
The Re p e r to r y Orchestra,
which is not a concert group, was
formed to enable students . to
learn the standard Symphonic
Repertory. Rehearsals are at 8
a.m. Monday through Friday at
Harris Hall. According to Prof.
Dunlap, a few instruments are
available for students who have
none of their own.
THE THREE University Bands,
under the direction of William
D. Revelli also will begin rehear-
sals this week. The Marching
Band which performs between

halves at the football games will
drill at 4:15 p.m. Monday through
Friday at South Ferry Field.
One'of the top college march-
ing bands in the nation, the
group will travel to Yankee Sta-
dium to perform at the Army
game this fall
Less spectacular than the
Marching Band, the Symphony
Band emphasizes sound musician-
ship. The band rehearses on a
part time basis at 7:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday during the football season,
when Director Revelli is busy with
the Marching Band. Later the
Symphony Group returns to a
full schedule.
The third band, the Varsity
Band, is a more informal organ-
ization whose main purpose is to
enjoy music. Intermission music
at the basketball games in Yost
Field House is provided by this
group.
* * *
SONGS OF A lighter nature
than those of the choirs form the
repertoire of the Men's Glee Club
under the direction of Prof. Phil-
ip Duey of the School of Music
and the Women's Glee Club di-
rected by Jeanette Floyd Estep.
T r i p s, serenades, broadcasts
and recordings are planned for
both groups.
Tryout time for the Men's Glee
Club is 7:15 p.m. tonight in the
Union Ballroom while the Wo-
men's Glee Club has set its try-
out time for 4 to 5 p.m. today,
tomorrow and Thursday and 7 to
9 p.m. tomorrow in the League.
. r a
THE UNIVERSITY Choral Un-
ion which performs at the Mes-
siah Concerts in December and
at two concerts of the May Fes-
tival with the Philadelphia Sym-
phony Orchestra is under the di-
rection of Prof. Lester McCoy of
the School of Music.
Last season's chorus members
who sang at the last May Festi-
val and had good attendance re-
cords may resume their member-
ship by making application im-
mediately at the office in Burton
Tower, according to the Univer-
sity Musical Society.
Vacancies in ech section will
be filled from new applicants who
are requested by the society to
make appointments for tryouts
at the office.
Engineering
Professors
Write Book
"Unit Operations," the first new
textbook onathessubject in 20
years, written by 11 University
professors, has been published
this month.
Prof. George Brown, chairman
of the chemical and metallurgical
department of the engineering col-
lege, led 10 members of his de-
partment in the writing of the
book.
Collaborating with Prof. Brown
were Professors Donald Katz, Alan
Foust, Robert White, William
Wood, Richard Schneidewind, Jul-
ius Banchero, Lloyd Brownell,
George Williams, Jessie York and
Joseph Martin.
A University alumnus, Prof.
Brown has taught here for 30
years.

ADaily,
PHOTO
FEATU RE
Story by
Robert Vaughn
Pictures by
Al Reid
Ed Kozma

U' Applies
New Photo,
Technique
Unique Process
First in Nation

SHUTTERS CLICK--Cameras are set and two returning students manage to smile as Marilyn
Johnson, 52Ed awaits her turn before the flashbulbs. The cameras, 20 of them in all, required
almost ten times as much space as the regular cameras employed in previous years at registra-
tion.

A HEARTY WELCOME IS
EXTENDED TO THE CLASS OF
1954
WHEN DOWNTOWN, DROP IN AND VISIT
OUR STORE. IT'S ALWAYS A PLEASURE TO
SHOW OUR MERCHANDISE.
WVE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE
Or NATIONALLY KNOWN MERCHANDISE
Mallory Hats
Van Hcusen & Manhattan Shirts, Neckwear, Pajamas
McGregor Sportswear.
Alligator Rainwear
Clothcraft and Winston Suits, Topcoats and Overcoats
Interwoven Hosiery - Wembly Ties
Strodivari Sport Shirts
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
"?IVe Serve to Serve agamn,
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET

CUTTING PHOTOS-The four photographs which are printed
instantaneously in the polaroid camera are cut at the next
station with a special cutting instrument.

The University scored anothe
first during registration week as
more than 20,000 students were
shot in record time.
No casualties were reported
however, and everybody seemed
pleased as 20 polaroid and cam-
era shutters clicked, bulbs flashed
and students received finished
identification photos in approxi-
mately one minute.
The new ID card procesing
system enabled students to pos-
sess their validated cards five
minutes after their pictures were
taken.
* **
UNDER THE old system ID
cards were not distributed until
the second week of school because
the photos were sent to Detroit
for developing and printing.
Not only has this delay been
eliminated by the new system
but the problem of retaking
pictures has also become negli-
gible. The instantaneous print-
ing reveals any defects and re-
takes are made on the spot.
With all 20 cameras in opera-
tion, sixteen to eighteen students
were photographed per minute.
Last Wednesday the camera shut-
ters clicked more than 5,500 times.
After minor refinements are
made the 20 cameras could photo-
graph 7,000 to 8,000 students in
an eight-hour day; according to
Dean Erich A. Walter who is
chiefly responsible (or the intro-
duction of the new system.
THE NEW procedure can be di-
vided into three parts. First, the
picture is taken by means of a
special device developed by Polar-
oid which produces four copies of
each subject.
As soon as the picture is
withdrawn from the camera,
the student carries it to the cut-
ter, where one of the prints is
given him. The other prints are
sent to various University de-
partments.
The student then parries the
print to the next table where it
is affixed to the ID card by a spe-
cial heat process.
The card is then validated with
the official stamp and the student
has It without any further delay.
THE LARGE SCALE use of
the Polaroid camera at Waterman
Gymnasium attracted the atten-
tion of many other universities in
in the mid-west.
Representatives f r o m the
University of Illinois, the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, the Ifni-
versity of Chicago, Purdue Uni-
versity and Western Michigan
have made a careful examina-
tion of the new method.
H. E. Davis, Jr., of the Polaroid
Corporation said last week that
this was the first time the Land
camera has been used on such a
large scale operation or at any
university.
INTRODUCTION of the .new
system, which required an unus-
ually large camera section, caused
few changes in the overall regis-
tration set-up, according to As-
sistant Registrar Edward G. Groes-
beck.
One change however, could not
possibly go unnoticed by men
students who in previous years
received their Union membership
cards in a congested Union office.
The new practice of issuing
membership cards near the
building exit was highly prais-
ed by SL members and a num-
ber of other students.
Another minor change brought
about by the large camera area
needed was the moving of the
fees section into the basement
and the shifting of the student
concessions to the tent outside the
building.
Opinions varied as to the ra-
pidity of the entire registration
process but most students queried
expressed praise for the new ID
card issuing system.

HEAT TREATMENT-By a special heating process Miss Jhn-
son's ID photograph is here attached to her card. This method
of affixing the picture is fast and dependable.

55AFFELL &BUSH
State Street on Campus
/ f \ .4' *:t'
y .
- D . ia4t yA~ $4
on so 75O M 750

PRESSING-An electrically heated pressing machine is used
as the final means of firmly securing Miss Johnson's picture to
her ID card.
Expasion o Journalism
School Continues After Fire;
With a new building and two tute political reporting of both
new faculty members, the jour- state and national issues. He
nalism department is overcom- was a night editor on The Daily
ing the handicap of all its offices in 1929.
nd classrooms being destroyed in Charles T. Haun, night city edi-
the Haven Hall fire last spring tor of the Detroit. Free Press, will
and is continuing its expansion teach pictorial journalism here
program. this semester.
The journalism department's of-
The new faculty members, both fices and classrooms now are lo-
graduates of the University, are ated at 512 S. State. This build-
John V. Field, '33, assistant pro- ing was originally the Zeta Psi
fessor of journalism, and Joseph1 fraternity house and later served

MAKING IT OFFICIAL-Miss Johnson smiles..as her ID card is
validated by the official seal which covers part of her photo-
graph and part of the card thus making it almost impossible
to change photographs.

' f i "": S < t. +t' .>, .:_ . .,.u :,< .., . , ' Y+i,...: r' ..:. _ h: {.SSaa.,ci6oL_: .:Y. r .3R t ..5,.,., t'...... j. NI, .M,
... f. eab.:,,,... ......

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan