100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 27, 1949 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

~TUESDAY, SEPTEMBERl 27, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,~*

BABY BUZZ BOMBS:
Scientists Use Rockets
In MeteorologyTests

Registration 1lues

Rockets haveu ses other than
breaking altitude records and go-
ing off at wrong times, according
to experiments being made by
University scientists in New Mex-
ico.
The experiments, using Aerobee
rockets (similar to the German
V-2 but smaller, will be to deter-
mine the variations of atmospher-
ic pressure and temperature be-
tween day and night.
G.J. Bills Will
EXpir"E in 1956
The two veterans' bills, the GI
Bill and Public Law 16, will expire
July 25, 1956.
Also applications for loans guar-
anteed by the government will not
be accepted after this date. Read-
justment allowances under the
n.52-20 Club will also expire July
25, 1956.
Exceptions to the ending of gov-
ernnent benefits at that time will
be men who enlisted or re-enlist-
ed after Oct. 6, 1945 and before
Oct. 6, 1946. The benefits for these
veterans expire nine years after
their discharge.

LATE THIS MONTH, the scien-
tists will fire two rockets at the
Air 'Force Proving Grounds at
White Sands, N. Mex., one in the
daytime and the other at night,
according to Nelson W. Spencer,
research engineer in the Univer-
sity's Engineering Research Insti-
tute.
Spencer is supervising the
project, in cooperation with the
Air Material Command division
of the Air Force. The high alti-
tude research work has been in
progress several years, and its
results are expected to aid in the
design of military equipment
and to add to fundamental
knowledge of weather factors.
Before the work began with the
rockets, direct observation of the
atmosphere was confined to bal-
loon ceilings of 20 miles above the
earth, Spencer said. The rockets
will enable similar observation up
to 100 miles high, he added.
* * *
EACH OF THE rockets in the
September firing will carry about
100 pounds of electronic equip-
ment and built by research engi-
neers and graduate students. The
equipment will measure atmos-
pheric pressure from ground to
the maximum height that the
rockets reach.

f..
m }~

Complete Stock of
All-Wool
~
Spi
COAT 'S
Plain or Fancy
OFF
NAVY "T" SHIRTS 50
White, regular 69c value... C

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PILE-UP-Students in the School of Business Administration have
tense looks on their faces and hopeful schedules in their hands as they wait for a chance to
elect such courses as accounting, marketing, tax problems, money and banking and personnel man-
agement problems. The strain of registration has begun to show as students try to talk their way
into closed sections while stony-eyed classifiers refrain from weeping at the hard-luck stories. One
student can only stare vacantly into space and dream of registering first thing Wednesday morning,
when he needn't worry about having all 8 o'clocks, 12 o'clocks and night and Saturday classes.

Y
'
{
..
t.

University of Miehigan
F L Y I N G C L U B
announces opening of fall membership
FLY CHEAPLY, LEAVE ANN ARBOR FAR BEHIND
FOR PLEASURE-FILLED WEEKENDS
" Put New York 4 hours away.
9 Make St. Louis 21/2 hours away
* Washington within 31 hours
Shorten the World!
See Your Old Flame or The Folks Weekends
L EARN TO FLY'
Listen to the Flying Club Record Mart on WPAG at 4:15 Daily
-1:00 and 3:00 Sunday
All campus invited to next meeting, Wed., Sept. 28, 7:30 P.M.,
at 1042 East Engineering Building

CAMPUS SPOKESMEN:
SL Starts Fourth Year
Of Student Government

Corduroy Slacks and Sport Coats

Student Legislature, government
for 20,000 students and their or-
ganizations, will begin its fourth
year next week.
Elected to two-semester terms
by the students twice a year, each
of the 50-odd legislators repre-
sents 400 students.
Organized on a Congress-Cab-
inet principle, the Legislature
meets bi-weekly to discuss student
policies and projects.
The cabinet, composed of offi-
cers elected from the Legislature
and two representatives-at-large
is the axis of the group.
* * * .
THE CABINET members con-
sider all proposed legislation and

"Bill" Lyons
Welcomes back both
Old and New patrons at
his new location,
1209 South University,
opposite the parking lot.
Lyons Barber Shop
1209 South University

decide which will be presented
at meetings. The cabinet also acts
as coordinator with the adminis-
tration,,other schools and the gen-
eral public.
Members of' the Legislature
serve on standing committees
which do the work of the gov-
ernment.
The Campus Action Committee
most directly reaches the students,
by conducting polls and investi-
gations for the information of the
Legislature and students.
SCHOOL SPIRIT IS the con-
cern of the Varsity Committee.
The Homecoming Dance and ac-
tivities are directed by this group,
as well as smoothing out seating
troubles for students at football
games.
Cooperating with the Wolver-
ine Club, the Varsity Commit-
tee also sponsors pep rallies and
team sendoffs and welcomes.
Representing the University na-
tionally and internationally, the
National Student Association Com-
mittee keeps up on activities of
the parent group.
THE COMMITTEE also enforces
the Student Bill of Rights, adopt-
ed by NSA. As a part of this, the
Committee on Discrimination is
now investigating discrimination
in dormitories, professional schools
and the community.
* * *Y
THIS COMMITTEE also con-
cerns itself with suggesting new
courses in the University.
The Social Committee plans the
social events of each weekend dur-
ing the year to prevent conflicts
with the many student groups, but
provide a full bill of entertain-
ment. A calendar of events is on
view in the Office of Student Af-
fairs in the Administration Build-
ing for registering dates for activ-
ities.

Pleats and zippers, grey,
brown, tan, green
and beige ...........

$795

ANN ARBOR

iT i

CLOTHING

1 13 South

Main

Phone

r ''

1

ALL COLORS
and SIZES ...........

mmm"

HELLO

I

i

"""""""
"'""""

MERLE NORMAN

Cosmetics

There

a U

Let its choose your color for you.
Courtesy Demonstrations.

May we
help you
contact
20,000
students?

VOGUE BEAUTY
SALON

300 S. Thayer

Phone 83841

P"S o m eb o d y 's".
and"Nobody $
and*
WE LIVE in bitter competition, whether it be for a girl's smile, a
better academic mark, or a Michigan vs. Stanford game.
Now that you mention "Men's Wear," it's Saffel & Bush that
leads the Michigan parade of better dressed men.
Just come in and BROUSE AROUND! "Seeing is believing."

For just a few pennies a day, a Michigan Daily

classified ad

can SELL, FIND, FIX, RENT,

-Here's a celebrated newspaper that offers you a wealth of
background material for your studies-"exclusives" about subjects
you are studying-and at a special low rate.
Full-page daily features on vital topics-from China to labor
unions-are rich theme sources .. . good for that "plus" mark
on exams, too. The latest word in scientific discoveries is also a
regular Monitor specialty.
A special "Washington Letter" in the Saturday Magazine
Section; widely quoted, forthright editorials; up-to-the-minute re-
views on books, art, theater; a business page and the literary
Home Forum page, are some exclusive Monitor benefits for you
to enjoy and use every day.
Take advantage of the college offer today. Only $6.50 for
9 months or $3 for 3 months. This offer lasts until November 15.

BUY, any article you wish!

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan