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September 27, 1949 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rfHL TVHCHIVL .k DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1949

TE... IG N A_______. 2, 94

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PLETHYSMOGRAPH:
'U' Medical Researchers
StudyInfants'_Breathing

Program Problems

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RABIDEAUa HA R RI

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An instrument corresponding to
a miniature iron lung has been
used by University medical re-
searchers in studying blood and
breathing complications in pre-
mature babies-.
The instrument, called a pleth-
ysmograph, is being used by Dr.
Bruce D. Graham and Dr. Helen
Rent Control
Office Moved
The Ann Arbor Branch Office
of the Housing Expediter has been
moved to Detroit, William C.
Haines, Area Rent Director has
announced.
The rent station which former-
ly existed in Ypsilanti has also
been discontinued. However, the
area rent representative will be at
the Council Chambers of the City
Hall in Ann Arbor every Friday
between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
The closing of the Branch Of-
fico in Ann Arbor does not mean
that rent control has been remov-
6d from Washtenaw County.
Landlord's petitions and tenant's
complaints will be processed
through the Detroit office.
It Wood?
WOODENHEAD, Mass.-If all
the wood used in the United States
in one year were made into planks
twenty feet wide and two feet
thick, it would form a boardwalk
long enough to reach the moon,
according to lumber experts.

S. Reardon to study breathing
patterns of 90 premature infants
when the oxygen content of the
air is controlled. The plethysmo-
graph was developed at Univer-
sity Hospital expressly for this
research.
DR. GRAHAM, resident in ped-
iatrics and communicable diseases
at University Hospital, and Dr.
Reardon, instructor in pediatrics,
explain that the object of the
study is to find out why premature
babies breathe irrgularly. The re-
search has shown that the cause
of this irregular breathing is that
oxygen is not reaching the tissue
of the brain center which controls
respiration.
Previous studies by Dr. James
L. Wilson, University professor
of pediatrics and communicable
diseases, have shown that when
the oxygen content of the at-
mosphre was increased above its
normal 20 percent, breathing
became more regular for pre-
mature infants.
These studies have also shown
that premature babies differ from
normal infants in having lower
temperatures, lower blood sugar,
different energy requirements and
lower carbon dioxide output.
They may also have undeveloped
liver and kidney organs, gelatin-
ous-like skin tissues, undeveloped
blood vessels in the brain tissues,
and undeveloped fingernails.
The Graham-Reardon studies
aim at discovering the causes of
these differences and finding ways
of overcoming them.

MAKES AN ALL-AMERICAN
ATHETE y.A
A T HLE TE*00

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-Daily-Alex Lmnanian
EVERYTHING comes Monday, Wednesday and Friday at nine, according to these coeds whose
doleful expressions were taken in Waterman Gym during registration. The woman on the left
is deciding whether tropical economic botany or Spanish sculpture is more important, while the
middle one is shuffling program cards, wishing she were playing canasta. Coed at right is giving up
entirely, ripping ideal program in half.

Grad Student Gets
Fulbright Award
Grace L. Wood, Grad., has been
awarded a Fulbright scholarship
for study and research in the
Philippines.
Miss Wood is a student of social
anthropology. She will remain in
the Philippines for at least one
year.

TEXTS BOUGHT, SOLD:
Student I3ok Exchange
To Stay Open All1Week

LYON & H EALY

IN ANN ARBOR
(508 East William)

IFC's Student Book Exchange
will remain open all week to sell
and buy used texts.
Located on the third floor of the
Paul Malkus
AttendsCo-op
Paul Malkus, '49, represented
the University at the Fourth An-
nual North American Student Co-
operative League Conference, held
recently in Austin, Tex.
Malkus is a member of Robert
Owen Cb-operative House and
serves on the constitutional com-
mittee of the NASCL.
Students from eight universities
and colleges attended the confer-
ence, representing members of
student housing, eating and book
co-operatives in 42 states.
Welcome
ItoU Mician
and to
the
Young Men's Shop
217 E. Liberty St.
(New location)
QOality Men's Wear
at Reasonable Prices
KUOHN'S
217 East Liberty Tel. 8020

Union, the Exchange is open from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
RUN AS A non-profit organiza-
tion by the Interfraternity Coun-
cil, the Exchange allows students
to price their own books and place
them on sale.
Unsold books may be claimed
from Oct. 3-6 while checks for
all books sold will be mailed out
within two weeks after the Ex-
change closes next Friday. A 15
per cent fee is charged to cover
overhead.
Pointing out that students can
usually buy Exchange books from
one to two dollars cheaper than
in most local bookstores, Exchange
manager Dick Brown, '50BAd.,
said, "We feel that the Student
Book Exchange not only is bene-
ficial to students wishing to sell
their used textbooks, but also of-
fers a splendid opportunity for
students to save money in buying
expensive books."
Although hampered by their in-
ability to find a more central lo-
cation for the Exchange, Brown
feels that they will do an even
greater volume of business this
year thanthe record of nearly $5,-
000 in sales last semester.

"Where the Good Clothes
Come From" ANN ARBOR

BACK TO SCHOOL

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and Back to
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EVERYTHING KNOWN IN ...
" SHEET MUSIC
" RECORDS * ACCESSORIES
" PORTABLES " MIDGET RADIOS

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MEDICAL

.. .DENTAL

. . . PUBLIC HEALTH

BOOKS and SUPPLIES
Our store is especially equipped with text-
books, reference books and supplies for Med-
ical Dental and Public Health Students.
VETERANS' ACCOUNTS CAPABLY HANDLED

;
Above: casually correct
anywhere you go -
this plaid beauty of 100?,Y wool.
Red, grey and black or brown, green
and red.
22.95
At right:
Perfect School Motes
our cloud soft sweaters--of cash-
mere, nylon, or wool jersey . . . and
our smart new skirts of wools, cor-
duroys and wool jersey to mix or
match.
from 3.50
Extreme Right: At a Game-
In the classroom-On a date .
you'll rate an A if you are wearing

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GAMES-CLASSES-DATES . . . and al-
ways the problem of what to wear.. . for
you we've gathered together a terrific col-
lection of casuals that should set your mind
at ease.
* Suits
* coats
" dresses
" jackets
" skirts
*"louses
"illinery
. handbags
* jewelry
* lingerie
,1ore1ost fashions

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