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October 29, 1949 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-29

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OCTOBER 29, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGEFV

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVl~

I

Boxer Marcel Cerdan
Killed in Plane Crash

'M' To Face Conference Leader

College Grid Round-U p

* * * *

(Continued from Page 1)
weight boxing champion, was fly-
ing to New York with his man-
ager, Jo Longman, and his trainer,
Paul Genser, for a title fight at
Madison Square Garden, Dec. 2
with Jake Lamotta.
He lost the world middle-
weight championship to LaMotta
in Detroit, June 18 after in-
juring his left arm in the first
round.
Cerdan, France's leading sports
figure, was in gay spirits when
he boarded the plane at Orly
Field, Thursday night.
"WITH ALL MY strength, I
want to get back that title I so
stupidly lost," Cerdan told friends
at the airport. "For those who say
I'm washed up I can say that,
despite my 33 years and 10 fights,
I feel myself at my peak."
Just before taking off, Cerdan
telephoned his wife in Casa-
blanca, Morocco. "I promise you
I'll bring back the world title,"
hie said.
His wife and two children live
on a farm outside Casablanca,
where Cerdan operated a cafe.
Scores of the boxer's friends clam-
ored outside the cafe for news of
the accident.
CERDAN FIRST invaded the
United States in 1946. Two years
later, on September 21, 1948, he
won the world middleweight title
by knocking out Tony Zale of
Gary, Ind., in the eleventh round
at Jersey City, N.J.
Jake LaMotta of Detroit lifted
the crown from the Moroccan
hero last June after 10 rounds,
An injured shoulder made Cer-
dan's left hand useless from the
first round.
Cerdan had won all but four of
his 105 bouts since he turned pro-
fessional in 1933. A native of Al-
giers, he was the outstanding
IWAGNER'SI

French boxer since the days of
Georges Carpentier.
HARRY MARKSON, director of
the International Boxing Club of
New York, said it would be two
or three days before the organiza-
tion started plans for a bout to
replace the Cerdan-LaMotta fight.
Meanwhile, salvage squads
groped their way about the
charred wreckage last night seek-
ing bcdies of the victims and clues
to the cause of the crash.
Sheepherders in the vicinity said
they saw the plane aflame before
it fell. The craft crashed near the
tip of the peak, 90 miles by sea
north of Santa Maria air base,
where it had been scheduled toj
land for refueling.

Wolverines Must Win Today
To Keep, Title Aspirations A live
Koceski Out; Offesive Burden Again
On Ortmnann; Line Primed to Stop Karras

(Continued from Page 1) 1

CHUCK ORTMAN ... Repeat performance?

OVER HILL AND DALE:
'1'Harriers To Compete i First Meetl

By BILL CONNOLLY
Today, for the first time in al-
most 20 years, a Wolverine cross-
country squad will compete in an
authorized meet.
When the Maize and Blue thin-
clads take to the hills in Cham-
paign at 10:30 this morning to face
a highly-rated Illinois squatd, it
will mark the first time since 1932
that Michigan has officially en-
tered in competition with another
cross-country team.
* *.*
BASING HIS selection on indi-
vidual performances in workouts
that began early in September,
Coach Don Canham. took six dis-
tance runners on the trip south.
The six men who will compete
for the Wolverines are Don Mc-
Ewen, Aaron Gordon, Jus Wil-
liams, Bruce Vreeland, Bill Hick-
man and Shel Capp.
McEwen is an outstanding
sophomore prospect who finished
first in each of the time trials that

Coach Canham held this fall. He
runs with machine-like endur-
ance, and should do a lot to bol-
ster prospects in distance events
for Michigan track teams in the
next three years.
GORDON AND HICKMAN are
also sophomores, and both have
shown up very well in practice
runs held this fall. Vreeland is
another outstanding distance run-
ner who was awarded a Varsity
"M" last spring for his perform-
ances in the mile and two-mile
events.
Capp, like Vreeland, is a Jun-
ior, and with two, full years of
competition ahead of him should
help a great deal to strengthen
Wolverine track and cross-coun-
try squads.
Williams, captain-elect for the
coming track season has long
been known to Wolverine track
fans as a stalwart performer in the
grueling two-mile and mile races
run in the past three years on Ann

Arbor cinders. He is the only sen-
ior who made the trip with Can-
ham.
THE ILLINI are rated as the
second best team in the Confer-
ence, with only last year's champs,
Wisconsin, ranked above them.
Their squad is led by Vic
Twomey, who last year finished
second to Wisconsin's great Don
Ghermann in the Conference
meet held in Chicago.
Behind Twomey are Lawton
Lamb, outstanding sophomore
runner; Bob Downs, who last
spring placed fourth in the finals
of the mile run held during the
Conference Championship; Walt
Jewsbury .and Don Schriefer.
The race will be four miles, run
over the rugged hill and dale
home course of the Illini. This
looms as a point in favor of the
Illinois squad, since the experience
of having thorough knowledge of
a home course is very advantage-
ous in a meet of this type.

leader Don Burson of Northwest-
ern, who has gained 364 yards.
Grange commented on the
shifty sophomore at the Zuppke
testimonial dinner Thursday
night saying, "Karras is the fin-
est back Illinois has had in a
long time. He's the best back
in the Conference I've seen for
quite a while!"
The other two members of the
combination are quite familiar to
Wolverine fans. In last year's 28-
20 victory over the Illini, the main
troublemakers for the Wolverines
were Bernie 'Krueger and Walt
Kersulis.
* * *
THIS QUARTERBACK and end
spearheaded a determined Illini
eleven to a near-upsettover Mich-
igan. The Krueger - to - Kersulis
combination personally accounted
for 216 out of the 256 yards gained
passing by completing 12 out of
21 tosses.
The aerial attack has not been
used extensively this year since
the ground game has been go-
ing so well, but may see lots of
use today against the Michigan
line. In last week's 19-0 win
over Purdue, for instance, the
Illini threw only five passes.
The last one, the only one in
the second half as a matter of
BILL CONNOLLY, Night Editor
fact, was a 20-yard toss from,
that's' right, Krueger to Kersulis
for a touchdown.
SO FAR THIS season Krueger
has passed 61 times and complet-
ed 31, for a neat .508 percentage,
accounting for all but 37 of Ill-
inois' 389 yards gained passing.
Kersulis has been on the receiving
end eight times and is respon-
sible ,3 yards of the total to
lead the Illini.
Just behind Kersulis in this
department is a sophomore,
Ronnie Clark. Clark is another
Orange and Blue player the
Wolverines are going to have to
keep an eye on.
Playing in his first year of col-
lege football, the 20-year-old half-
back is up among the leaders in
almost every department. He is
second in pass receiving with eight
completions for 92 yards.
* * *
IN TOTAL yardage he is third,
behind Karras and Burt Schmidt,
in the list of men who have car-
ried the ball 25 times or more.
Clark has gained 201 yards in 42
attempts for a 4.7 average.
He is second to Karras in the

i

scoring department, having
scored two touchdowns. Karras
has toted the ball across five
times this season.
These men are characteristic of
the Illinois team which has shown
amazing speed and quickness all
season both on offense and de-
fense.
* * *
MICHIGAN SCOUT Bill Orwig
stated after watching the Illini
last week, "Illinois is a team that
is improving from week to week.
It is a young, eager outfit that
wants to win."
The Wolverines will have vir-
tually the same team that took
the measure of Minnesota last
week, ready to go this afternoon.
End Bob Holloway and fullback
Don Dufek, who received minor
injuries in the Gopher game, are
ready to play today.,

By The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS -- From pre-
game indications, sophomores will
be seeing a lot of action in Minne-
sota's football game with Purdue
today.
Purdue's coach, Stu Holcomb,
feels that he might as well give
his second-year men some ex-
perience, because the Boiler-
makers are the underdogs.
Bernie Bierman, Minnesota's
head coach, has been experiment-
ing all week with various lineup
combinations. Just how important)
a part the sophomores will play
remains a mystery, as the Gophers
worked out behind locked doors.
* * *
EAST LANSING-Although the
squad is shot through with in-
juries, Michigan State is the heavy
favorite to pile up an embarrass-
ing score against Temple today.
Reportedly the best man in
the Temple backfield is Paul
Dubenetzky, the passing quar-
terback, who has pitched five
touchdown passes this year.
Temple also has won its last
four games but was not up
against too impressive competi-
tion
The Spartans still have Lynn

Chandnois, the best man in their
backfield, to carry the burden at
right half and at left half, Hor-
ace Smith, well remembered by
Temple as the runner who made
both touchdowns in the 14-6 de-
feat in 1947.
* * *
BALTIMORE - Notre Dame is
favored to roll over Navy here
today and set a modern record
with a string of 33 football games
without defeat. Coach Frank
Leahy, bedridden with influenza,
is due to arrive at the field just
prior to the game.
Coach George Sauer of Navy
isn't sure himself of his team's
spirit after two straight defeats
at the hands of Wisconsin and
Penn.
* * *
MILWAUKEE-Marquette Uni-
versity's homecoming queen will
have to go to the football game
alone. The king has another date
-with his wife and four kids.
The students elected pretty
Jean Smyth, Milwaukee, to reign
over the University homecoming
Nov. 5. Traditionally, the queen
is escorted to the football game
-in this case, with the Univer-
sity of South Carolina-by the
homecoming chairman.
Edwin L. Bemis, Milwaukee, a
medical school senior, was ap-
pointed chairman by the Mar-
quette union board. Bemis is mar-
ried and has four children-Billy,
six months; Bridget, 2; Cathie, 4;
and Eddie, 5.
Mrs. Bemis has decided her hus-
band will take her to the game.
She's already hired a baby-sitter
for the kids.
Late Scores
Villanova 28 Boston College 14
John Carroll 38 Bowling Green 24
Detroit 13 Oklahoma A&M 7
Los Angeles Dons 24 Chicago Hor-
nets 14
Continuous from 1 P.M.
sTi soy
-- Lost Times Today --

OLD OAK CAN BUCK IT:
Franks Guards Michigan
Victory Over 1942 Illin

1,

l I I

11-

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Open 24 hours daily
0
The home of the
50e LUNCH
Washington and
Ashley

(Continued from Page 4)
Keller, a member of the School of
Music faculty. The public is in-
vited.
Events Today
S.R.A.: Saturday Luncheon Dis-
cussion will meet with the Insti-
tute on International Relations
at the Methodist Church at 12:45.
Hillel Foundation -"Dogpatch
Stomp"-barn dance: 8-12 mid-
night. Wear blue jeans. Refresh-
ments.

Unitarian Student Group: All
Hallow's Eve party and Black
Mass, 7:30 p.m., Unitarian Church,
1917 Washtenaw. All invited.
Congregational-Disciples Guild:
Fireside at 438 Maynard. Sue Ta-
bibian will tell about her experi-
ences in a German work camp.
Time: 7:30-9 p.m.
Ullr Ski Club: Listening party,
2:30 p.m., 420 N. Fourth Ave.
Phone 8671.
Michigan Crib Pre-Law Society:
Members desiring to go through
the Washtenaw County Court
House will meet at the League at
8:30 a.m. today.
Weekend Institute: "The United
States-Her World Responsibili-
ties" sponsored by American
Friends Service Committee and
SRA will be held this weekend Sat-
urday and Sunday at Lane Hall.
Westminster Guild: television
party, Saturday afternoon at game
time, 3rd floor lounge, Presbyte-
rian Church. All invited.
U. of M. Hostel Club: Sat.-Sun.,
Oct. 29-30, Halloween Bike to Har-
mony Valley. Meet 8:30 a.m., Sat.
at the League with packed lunch;
and bike, ready for 45 mile cycle to;

hostel. Sleeping bag and pass nec-
essary.
Coming Events
All Business Education majors
and minors are invited to attend a
get acquainted coffee hours at
4:15 p.m., Mon., Oct. 31, Univer-
sity Elementary School Library,
1502 U.E.S. Recent graduates will
be present to discuss problems
which confront the beginning busi-
ness teacher.
I.Z.F.A. picnic, Sun., Oct. 30, 3
p.m. Meet at W.A.B. In case of
rain meet at Hillel Everyone wel-
come.
Graduate Outing Club: Hallow-
een party. Northwest entrance of
Rackham Building. Sunday 2:15-
10:00. Dress warmly and bring
flashlights.
U.W.F. Seminar: Sun., 8 p.m.,
Residence of Barnet Frommer,
530 Thompson St.
IZFA-Hebrew Circle meeting,'
Rm. K, Union, 11 a.m., Sun., Oct.
30.
U. of M. Hot Record Society:
Program featuring some new and
some old jazz, League Ballroom,
Sun., 8 p.m. Everyone invited.

1942 was not an exceptional
year for the Michigan football
team.
That season, the Wolverines lost
three games, including a 16-14
heartbreaker to Minnesota, to tie
for third place in the Western
Conference.
BUT IT WAS a great year for
the might Maize and Blue line,
dubbed by sportswriters as the
Seven Oak Posts, and for Julie
Franks, undoubtedly one of the
finest guards to ever wear a Michi-
gan uniform.
Along with Phil Sharpe, El-
mer Madar, Al Wistert, Bill Pri-
mula, Bob Kolesar and Merve
Pregulman, Julie played on that
immortal line, a line which
would have stacked up well even
against the Seven Mules of No-
tre Dame fame.
The Wolverine backfield was
better than average in 1942, and
included such men as George
Ceithaml, Paul White, Bob Wiese,
and an unknown sophomore, Bob
Chappius. The star of the team,
however, was lineman Julie
Franks, ,the husky Negro who
earned posts df the mythical All-
American elevens of Grantland
Rice and Newsweek Magazine.
* * *
FRANKS was unable to play ball
his senior year because of a seri-
ous illness, but the 187 pound 60
minute guard from Hamtramck
will always be remembered for one
showing in particular, against a
powerful Illinois team in 1942.
Pre-game dopsters had tagged
the game as a hot battle be-

tween two
candidates,
Alex Agase

All-American guard
Franks and fiery
of the Fighting II-

But, on November 1, 1942, in the
Michigan Stadium, Illinois, previ-
ously unbeaten that season in con-
ference play, suffered a 28-14 set-
back at the hands of an improved
Wolverine squad.
* * *
THE HEADLINES in THE
DAILY the next day screamed,
"Seven Oak Posts Earn Michigan
28-14 Win; Franks Outfights
Agase In Front-Line Struggle."
One story began, "Julie had it all
over his All-American guard foe,
Alex Agase."
Franks turned in on that cold
November day what was, per-
haps, the greatest line perform-
ance ever registered by a Wichi-
gan guard. Ray Eliot, Illinois
coach, said, "Franks is one of
the best guards I have seen any
place any time."
And Agase, the guard who was
on the receiving end of Franks'
fine play remarked, "That guy can
play with me instead of against me
from now on
* * *
HIS FINE showing prompted
Jim Craig, an Illini tackle, to say,
"I could only see one guard on the
field, Franks. He just couldn't be
stopped like an ordinary man, it
took the whole side of the line."
This same Julie Franks had
planned to be on hand today in
Champaign when the Wolver-
ines battle the 1949 edition of
the Illinois team.

- Starts Sunday -
HE'S RED HOT IN A
SCREEN SEARING
STORY

I

TODAY and SUNDAY
Continuous from 1 P.M.

I

ORPH E UM
Cinema Triumphs
From All The World

Bergman's
Greatest
Romance
BERG MAN'S BEST
_INCRID BE RGMAN * a.E~S~ ~ H~
Also "Professor Tom" a Tom and Jerry Cartoon All Seats 50c
HALLOWEEN
l1 MIDNIGHT SHOW
1 TONIGHT i11

fi.

theIllnostam
hi

III'

Art Cinema League and SDA
present

Ill

ENDING
TONIGHT
.-

MICHIGAN vs.
MINNSOTA

i

a. ..Ip

I

I

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9

"PYGMALION"

New Hill Auditorium
TON ITE 8:30 P.M. 50c
Box Office Open 2 P.M..

Also MERRIE MELODY "Swallow The Leader"

I

_ __ _
I I

Coming Sunday - "MY FRIEND IRMA"

{II

l('

COMING!

IN PERSON!

LAST
TIMES
TONIGHT

MARJORIE MAIN e PERCY KILBRIDE
in "MA and PA KETTLE"
Also
"BROTHERS IN THE SADDLE"

Here's A Breakfast
You Can't Beat!

2

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GHi

90
HRIEK FILLED
OSTLY FEATURES

,2 -DAYS-2 "SUNDAY
a I and MONDAY
76/ea TPea x Possessed by
M DG a Craving
MY-REASAN } :}.,.Yand
j BRAEN jontroll
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J. D. MILLER'S Cafeteria
offers you a man-sized
breakfast for
only 39c

'WRAYNE KING
AND THE DON LARGE CHORUS
Sponsored By
University of Michigan's Men's Glee Club
at
HILL AUDITORIUM

"The

Mummy's
^I r _I.

"Ghost
of
Fronken-

NOVEMBER 5

(Use this convenient form for ordering Tickets)
-----------------------------
University of Michigan
Men's Glee Club

8 P.M.

annan

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