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October 29, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

U

Faculty Gets
Revamped
Newsletter
Monthly Explains
Employes' Duties
A revamped eight-page newslet-
ter featuring inside stories on the
complex functions of the Univer-
sity's 7,000 employes was issued to
faculty and staff members yester-
day.
Entitled the "University Rec-
ord," the newsletter was first pub-
lished from 1891 to 1895, prima-
rily to explain the University to
alumni and the press. It was re-
vived during 1938 to 1944 for the
teaching faculty only.
** *
THIS YEAR the "Record" has
been reissued by the University In-
formation Services and will be
published monthly, carrying news
of University policies, administra-
tive measures and departmental
news to all members of both the
academic and nonacademic staffs.
In a statement appearing on
the front page of the initial is-
sue of the newsletter, President
Alexander G. Ruthven pointed
out that carrying out the func-
tions expected of the University
by the State, "depends upon the
coordinated efforts of more than
7,000 persons."
"Teamwork is absolutely nec-
essary in an organization like ours,
and you have that only when the
members of the team understand
each other, the object of the game,
and the reason behind each play,"
he said.
* * *
FEATURED ON THE front page
of the current issue of the newslet-
ter is a story explaining the tre-
mendous job done by one depart-
ment which plays a vital role in
the lives of all University staff
members-the Payroll Offnce.
The story describes in detail
the intricate process of writing
more than 10,000 paychecks
every month.
The inside pages are highlighted
by features on the Romance Lan-
guages, new oral laboratory in
South Wing, the University's Sta-
tistical Research Laboratory, the
proposed $20,000,000 Medical Re-
search Center and a statement of
the purposes of the School of Busi-
ness Administration by Dean Rus-
sell A. Stevenson.
IN ADDITION, articles about
individual faculty and staff mem-
bers and calendars of coming
events are included in the publica-
tion.
CIO Farm Union
Merged with UEW
CHICAGO - () -- The CIO
United Farm Equipment Workers
of America announced yesterday
that the union has merged with
the CIO United Electrical Work-
ers.
Both unions are left wing units
of the CIO. They are threatened
with 'expulsion from the CIO at
the CIO convention in Cleveland
next week.

-Daily-Waily Barth
A "HALLOWE'EN" SUCCESS-Members of the newly organized Journalism Society are in high
spirits as they gather around a cider-filled punch bowl at their first social gathering of the year.
The party, a Hallowe'en record dance, was held at the League last night.
DOCTORS SAY HE'S WELL:
Thomas To Stand Trial for Fraud

(4'

WASHINGTON - (P) - Rep.,
J. Parnell Thomas (Rep., N.J.)
yesterday was ordered to stand
trial next month on fraud charges
after a federal court was advisedl
the long-ailing lawmaker now is
well enough to handle "two to
three high-balls before dinner
and three to four cigars daily."
This report on Thomas' condi-
tion was included in a detailed
clinical, analysis prepared by two
private physicians here. They ex-
amined the 54-year-old Congress-
man last Wednesday at the re-
quest of Federal Judge Alexander
Holtzoff.
HOLTZOFF promptly ordered

that Thomas be on hand Nov. 7
when the twice-deferred fraud
hearings are scheduled to get un-
derway.
Thomas, one-time chairman of
the House Un-American Activi-
ties Committee, was indicted
Nov. 8, 1948, charged with con-
spiring to defraud the govern-
ment out of $1,698.37 by pad-
ding his office payroll and
through "kickbacks" from his
employes.
If convicted, the 54-year-old
lawmaker faces a maximum of 32
years in prison and fines amount-
ing to $40,000.
HOLTZOFF ALSO ordered,

Museum Plans To Highlight
American Art Next Month

(4>

The November spotlight of the
University of Michigan Museum
of Art will be focused on "Con-
temporary American Painting,"
according to Prof. Jean Paul Slus-
ser, director of the Museum.
The exhibition, which will be dis-
played in the galleries of Alumni
Memorial Hall, will include 24
modern paintings from the Cran-
brook Museum of Art as well as 20
canvases from the Museum of
Modern Art in New York.
INCLUDED in the Cranbrook
group are "Near the Sea" by Max
Weber, "Chandelier" by Karl Zerbe
and Reginald Marsh's "Coney Is-
land."
"Fisherman's Wife" by Doris
Lee is also among the Cran-
brook paintings to be exhibited.
Miss Lee is well known to Ann
Arbor art enthusiasts through
her works for the Michigan on
Canvas exhibition which was
displayed at the Rackham Gal-
leries last year.
Among the outstanding paint-
ings assembled and circulated by
the Museum of Modern Art are
those of Stephen Greene, Carl
Hall, Henry Koerner, Arthur Os-
ver, Charles Seliger and Dorothea
Tanning.
THE WORK of all these artists
is both varied and personal and
reflects the freedom of approach
that painters now inherit from
the experimentalism of the early

For the BEST
in BOOKS

twentieth century," Prof. Slusser
said.
"Realism is dominant in most
of the canvases but the objects are
seen in a context of mood and
ideas," Prof. Slusser explained.
Typographical
Union Guilty of
T-H Violation
WASHINGTON - (P) The
National Labor Relations Board
yesterday unanimously held the
AFL International Typographical
Union guilty of violating the Taft-
Hartley Act.
The Board said the big printers
union had set up illegally a "bar-
gaining strategy" which tried to
impose closed shop conditions in
the newspaper publishing indus-
try.
THE TAFT-HARTLEY Act bans
the closed shop under which only
union members can get jobs.
The Board ordered both the
ITU and its Chicago Local No.
16 not to try to force "discrimi-
nation" against employees in vi-
olation of the Act.
The Board ruled in two cases-
charges growing out of the22-
month Chicago newspaper strike
which was settled last month; andE
charges filed by the American
Newspaper Publishers Association
on behalf of its 800 newspaper
members.
*" * *
THE "BARGAINING strategy"
which the board condemned was
an attempt to impose "conditions
of employment," under which ITU
members would work without a
contract.
The Board called this an ef-
fort to compel employers to
maintain closed shop conditions
"by the use of a continuing
threat to strike."
Actually the ITU and its top of-
ficers have been under a federal
court injunction since March 27,
1949, forbidding them to engage in
the bargaining practices which
were alleged to be violations of
the Taft-Hartley Act.

Thomas former secretary, Miss
Helen Campbell, to appear for
trial Nov. 7. She was indicted on
a conspiracy charge at the same
time Thomas was and, if convict-
ed, faces a maximum of two years
in prison plus a $10,000 fine.
Both have been free under
bonds of $1,000 and $500 respec-
tively ever since the indictments
were returned by a federal grand
jury here last year.
The medical report on the pres-
ent state of Thomas' health was
ordered by Holtzoff after defense
attorneys sought to win another
trial delay on the grounds their
client was not physically equal to
it.
* * *
THE COURT selected two local
private physicians to make the
check-up after the Army refused
to handle the medical examina-
tion at Walter Reed Hospital
where Thomas was operated on
for a stomach disorder last spring.
The judge did not make pub-
lic the report the two doctors
submitted.
U. S. District Attorney George
M. Fay told reporters however
that the physicians joined in the
conclusion "that the defendant
has made a complete recovery and
is in physical condition to stand
trial at this time."
* * *
THE REPORTS, made by Drs.
Charles S. White and Wliam Earl
Clark, later were filed with the
court clerk and made a part of
the official case record.
The doctors said their study
showed that Thomas had suffered
from dyspepsia for about nine
years and that beginning in 1940
he began to have hemorrhages
from the gastro-intestinalrtract
"probably due to ulcers."
Grad Outing
Tomorrow
The Grad Outing Club will hold
a Halloween party at 2:30 p.m. to-
morrow.
Plans include a picnic supper, a
bonfire and games.
Since the party will be held some
distance from Ann Arbor, all grad-
uates with cars are urgently re-
quested to come, according to Kurt
Stern, Grad.
Members will meet at the north-
west corner of the Rackham Build-
ing.
* * *
Graduate Council
Officers Elected
Frederick Cook has been elected
president of the Graduate Student
Council.
Other newly elected officers are
Melvin Marcus and Paul Roten,
vice-presidents; Lenore Frane, re-
cording secretary; Edith Kovach,
corresponding secretary; and
Lloyd Partridge, treasurer.
Meetings of the Graduate Coun-
cil are open to all interested grad-
uate students.
11U I N 1111

New Heads
Of Infirmary
Quit Places
County Officials
To HoldHearing
The acting superintendent and
matron at the County Infirmary,
resigned suddenly Thursday night.
The couple, Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Dailey, submitted their res-
ignation to the County Social Wel-
fare Commission exactly nine
months after their appointment
to the positions.
DAILEY HAS been asked to ap-
pear before the commission next
Tuesday. As yet his resignation
has neither been accepted nor re-
jected.
Dailey said, however,, that he
has turned all, his keys over to
Head Nurse Mrs Dorothy Chud-
inski and "she's taking over."
The Daileys claim to have "a
hundred reasons" for quitting
their posts. Chief among these is
the fact that as yet they have not
been confirmed by the Welfare
Commission.
THE DAILEYS were selected
from a field of 14 applicants for
the post vacated by Mr. and Mrs.
Kennett. The Kennetts resigned
due to "unpleasantness" resulting
from criticism of their manage-
ment.
According to Dr. Edwin C.
Ganzhorn, county physician,
the supervision at the Infirmary
has "improved practically 100
per cent" since the Daileys took
over.
Comment on the situation was
not obtainable from either the
Welfare Department, the Welfare
Commission or the Board of Su-
pervisors.
The Daileys expect to remain at
the infirmary for about a month,
the time necessary for the com-
mission to hire replacements.
IFC's Talent
Show Will Be
Free--Tinker
The IFC Talent Show, to be
held December 1, will be free to
the public, Dick Tinker, '51 A&D,
IFC publicity chairman, empha-
sized yesterday.
The IFC had previously stated
that "proceeds from the show"
would be used. to finance 'its an-
nual Christmas Show for Ann Ar-
bor children. The Daily printed
this statement in Tuesday's issue.
* * *
TINKER declared that the IFC
will finance both the Talent and
Christmas Shows "out of its own
pocket.
Any student, whether inde-
pendent or affiliated, may enter
the Talent Show, Tinker said.
He asked applicants to mail a
card stating name, type of act,
address and telephone number
to IFC, Rm. 3C, Union.
The 10 best acts in the Talent
Show will enter the annual Christ-
mas Show, to be held later in De-
cember. The best acts will be de-
termined by audience applause,
Tinker stated.
THE THREE best acts in the
Christmas Show, as judged by Ann

Arbor children, will be awarded
prizes.
"Campus support is urgently
needed in the Talent Show, in or-
der to make the Christmas Show a
success for Ann Arbor children,"
Tinker said.
Eight Ton 'Baby' Whales
The giant sulphur-bottom, or
blue whale may be 100 feet long
and weigh as much as 150 tons.
This is about fifty times more
than an elephant. Even the new-
born baby whale sometimes weighs
8 tons, which is heavier than two
large elephants.
SET THE STYLE ON CAMPUS
with a matched sweater and skirt
of imported woolens.
Make your own $50.00 ensemble
for only $12.95 complete.
We supply the "Makings"
Hand-Loomed Wool Cloth
Yarn Dyed to Match
Free samples in 10 colors
LOOM-SETS
Box 251, G.P.O., New York 1, N.Y.

Nehru Inspects Tractor

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1949
Shah of Iran
To Visit Here
In November
Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Shah
of Iran, is expected to arrive in
Ann Arbor for a visit with his
brother, Mahmoud Pahlavi, on or
around November 26.
Mahmoud Pahlavi is a graduate
student in the School of Business
Administration.
EXPECTED TO arrive in Wash-
ington, D.C. November .16, the 30-
year-old sovereign of oil-rich Per-
sia will make the journey aboard
President Truman's private plane.
As yet Shah Pahlavi has not
left Tehran, his capital in the
Near East.
International Center officials
said yesterday that an invitation
had been extended to the Shah to
visit Ann Arbor.
NO FORMAL reply has been re-
ceived as yet, but they said that it
had been indirectly indicated that.
he would arrive November 26.
The "adam's apple" received its
name from the belief that a piece
of the apple that Eve gave to
Adam stuck in his throat.

,A

Today's
Pro grams
MUSIC-6:30 p.m., NBC Sym-
phony conducted by Arturo Tos-
canini-Berlioz excerpts from
"Romeo and Juliet," Debussy,
"La Mer"-WWJ.
7:30 p.m. Vaughn Monroe -
.WJR.
FOOTBALL-Bill Stern covers the
Mich.-Ill. game-WJR.

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VISITS TRACTOR PLANT-India's Prime Minister Jawaharlal
Nehru (right), making a good will tour of the United States, dons
safety glasses as he gets a closeup view of a large tractor pointed
out by Fowler McCormick of the International Harvester Co.

Riding Horses For Hire

4

01

Buy at

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counsellor
Roger Williams Guild, 502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study Class.
11:00 A.M.: Morning worship. Sermon, "Protes-
tant Foundations."
6:00 P.M.: Guild Program. Nancy Richardson,
Field Secretary of the American Friends Service
will speak about "Summer Service in Mexico."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 H i ll Street
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
9:10-10:00 A.M.: Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and Trinity
Churches.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. supper meeting in Zion Parish
Hall, program following. Speaker-The Rev.
David Holland of Detroit on "Why Do We
Have a Liturgy?"
7:30-8:30 P.M. Tuesday: Discussion of the De-
nominations of the Christian Church at the
Center.
-4:00-5:30 P.M. Wednesday: Tea and Coffee
Hour at the Center.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D. and W. H. Henderson,
Ministers
Maynard Kle.in, Director of Music
Mildred Beam, Director of Church School
9:30 A.M.: Westminster Guild Seminar in Reli-
gion. Coffee and rolls at 9:00 A.M.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Dr.
Lemon, "Memo from the Unseen."'
5:30 P.M.: Guild supper in Social Hall.
6:30 P.M.: Student panel on "Why I am a
Christian.".
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
10:30 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services in the
ballroom of the Michigan League building.
Oct. 30-Everlasting Punishment.
10:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial meeting.
A free Reading Room is maintained by this church
at 211 East Washington St.,nwhere the Bible
and all authorized Christian Science literature
may be read, borrowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily except Sundays and holi-
days from 11:30 A.M. to 5 P.M., on Saturdays
to 9 P.M.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN
(Disciples of Christ)

Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Earl Grandstaff, Acting Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:45, A.M.: Student Class.
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Nursery for children during the service.
Guild House, 438 Maynard St.
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Associate
Student Guild-6:00 supper at the Congregational
Church. Rev. Harold Sullivan, Clinton, Mich.
will speak on "Personal Religion in Action."
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Chaplain
John R. Hetzberg, Director of Sacred Music.
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Reformation Sun-
day. Sermon: "On Acting as a Protestant."
Anthems: "A mighty Fortress is our God"-
Luther-Eccard; "Jesu, Priceless Treasure "-
Bach.
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.: Study and Discussion, "The Case for
Christianity"-C. S. Lewis. Leaders: Mrs. Ger-
ald McCarthy, Dan Kirk, Philip Bedient.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Student Directors-Rev. H. L. Pickerill,
Miss eon Garee
Music-WayneGDunlap, J. Bertram Strickland
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Nursery is maintained.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on "Sunset at Noon."
6:00 P.M.: Student supper. Rev. Harold Sullivan
will speak on "Personal Religion in Action."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor .
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study. 1 Cor. 6.
10:30 A.M.: Morning Service, in new chapel.
Reformation Sermon by the Pastor, "A Chris-
tian's Theological Method."
5:30 P.M.: Supper anol program of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club. Gamma Delta Initia-
tion and Founders Day Ceremony.
9:15 P.M. Tuesday: Social Hour.

EXCEPTIONALLY FINE
NEW HORSES
Instructions Available
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
GENE BLAND, Mgr.
3250 E. Huron River Dr. Ph. 7772

CHURCH

Yellow& Checker Cabs
Operated by the
Ann Arbor Taxicab & Transfer Company.
Ann Arbor's Only Taxicab Co.,
Authorized by the
Michigan Public Service Commission to
Operate Between Ann Arbor and Willow Run
PHONE 4244
24-HOUR SERVICE
CABS AVAILABLE FOR CHARTER

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IT'S COMING SOON!

TA 1 4r

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Avenue
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale, Pastor
Rev. Walter S. Press, Pastor
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
I A- A A AA .- AA, ; - n WnrXA i.L.2. n mr,.. ...O,.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1017 o-nn S.. fL..... 3 fQ

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