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May 28, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

si

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAYo .t. iWA.Y R.vv~5

v-

!

State Jobless
EVERYTHING Cut by_18,000
DETROIT - (AP) - The total of
M i ch ig an's unemployed was
whacked 18,000 in the month end-
ing Apr. 15, the State Unemploy-
ment Compensation Commission
Only 203,000 out of a total labor
force of 2,401,000 were looking for
jobs Apr. 15, the MUCC said.
WROf the totals, Detroit had 1,166,-
000 at work and 114,000 idle, in-
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE cluding 78,000 thrown out of jobs
by the Chrysler strike.
316 South State Every major city reported a drop
in unemployment between Mar. 15
and Apr. 15.
SUMMER ISSUE
ON CAMPUS
At Local Book Stores and Music Shops
June 1st 35 cents

PEAK-HEADS STRIKE IN NIGHT:

Pinnacles Holds Traditional Tapping

Pinnacles, little-known but vast-<
ly influential campus honorary,
has struck in the dead of night.
A swarm of hooded and blind-
folded members of the society last
night carried off a large contin-
gent of worthy student nonentities
to the court of the Mighty Peak-
Headed One in their traditional
tapping ceremonies.
* * *
GASPS OF astonishment were
the order of the day at fraternity
and independent breakfast tables
as the empty chairs were totaled.
It is believed that this year's
quota was the largest number of
men ever tapped by the highly-
secret Pinnacles honorary.
The criteria which the honorary
uses in selecting its members have
long been a tightly-kept secret.
But it has recently been learned
from a well-informed but uniden-
tifiable source that membership
requirements consist- of:
1. Absolutely no participation
in extra-curricular activities.
2. A general lack of any sort
of distinction whatsoever.
Not much else is known of Pin-
nacles except that the organiza-
tion levies a heavy initiation fee
which is applied toward "The Pro-
ject."
g
FOR MANY years Pinnacles has is
employed its famed "hit-or-miss" p
tapping ceremony in which mem- t
bers of the group stalk, hooded
and blindfolded, into men's sleep-
ing quarters and select their new
members by a process which has
been described by reliable wit-
nesses as "a cross between phreno-
logy and blind man's bluff."l
The only publicity which the

A . L L

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent Iz
typewritten form to the Office of they
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day ,preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. $aturdavs).

SUNDAY, MAY 28, 1950
VOL LX, No. 166
Notices

4
A.

-Day-Burt Sapowitcn
TAPPING TIME-This exclusive Daily photograph catches two members of Pinnacles, obscure,
campus honorary, tapping a new member. The pretesting neophyte was bundled off to the court of
the Mighty Peak-Headed One shortly after this picture was taken. Hooded and blindfolded, the two
Pinnacle members are employing the society's traditional "hit-or-miss" tapping technique.

DMAS

roup has allowed up to this time
s a cryptic poem which has ap-
eared annually in The Daily at
apping time:
"Plopped down plunk with
gurgling grunts,
Pinnacle poo and capped with
dunce.
Chamois our sham; make no
bones.
Sharpness counts when heads
are cones.
Greasy grovel to those an-
nointed,
We tap tools whose heads are
pointed."

Pharmaceutical
Officers Installed
The final meeting of the Ameri-
can Pharmaceutical Association
was highlighted by the installa-
tion of new officers for the com-
ing year.
Dean Charles Stocking, of the
pharmacy school, presided as gen-
eral chairman of the meeting.
The officers are George Bender,
president; Donald Stocks, vice-
president; Gordon Goyette, Jr.,
secretary; and Everett Mac Arth-
ur, treasurer.

a
in
p

Because of the nature of the
case and the ages of those involv-
ed, The Daily withholds their
names.
Rutliven Will
Appearon TV
President Alexander Ruthven
and two University professors will
appear on television and radio pro-
grams today and tomorrow.
President Ruthven will speak on
the Michigan-Memorial Phoenix
Project at 10 p.m. tomorrow over
Station WXYZ-TV, Detroit.
Prof. James Miller, chairman of
the psychology department, and
Prof. Theodore Newcomb, of the
psychology and sociology depart-
ments, will appear on the Univer-
sity of Chicago Roundtable at 1:30
p.m. today.
"Psychological Techniques for
Maintaining Peace" will be the to-
pic of the roundtable. Prof. Walter
Johnson, of the University of Chi-
cago, will also take part.

Health Group
ElectsMurphy
Dr. Melbourne Murphy, admin-
istrative assistant in Health Ser-
vice and lecturer in the School of
Public Health, has been elected
president of the Michigan State
Health Association.
The group, representing all Mi-
chigan health services, elected Dr.
Murphy at its annual meeting in
Lansing.
Officers Chosen
Greene House officers for next
year were chosen in a recent house
election.
The men elected were: Ralph
Greenwood, '52E, president; Phil
Van Houten, '52, vice-president;
Robert Lawson, '53, East Quad
Council representative; Raymond
Decker, '52E, secretary; Robert
Powell, '52, treasurer; and Bruce
Bartholomew, '53, AIM representa-
tive.

Dougherty Chosen
Marshall Holloway, head of the
Los Alamos scientific laboratory's
weapons division, has announced
the appointment of John E.
Dougherty to his staff.
Dougherty has 'been employed
by the University's Engineering
Research Institute and worked on
the development and construction
of the University's synchrotron.

S

.....

Women students will have 12:3G
a.m. late permission Mon., May 29
and 11 p.m. late permission, Tues.,
May 30.
Women's Judiciary Council
The General Library and all the
Divisional Libraries will be closed
Tues., May 30, Memorial Day, a
University holiday.
Orientation Group Leaders: Wilt
the Orientation Group Leaders for
Women's Groups, who attended
the Orientation Meeting on May
16, come to the Social Director's
Office and fill out the cards thate
we neglected to bring to that
meeting.
Student Accounts: Your atten-
tion is called to the following rules
passed by the Regents at their
meeting on February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay 9,ll account ,
due the University not later than
the last day of classes of each se-
mester or summer session. Student
loans which are not paid or renew-
ed are subject to this regulation;
however, student loans not yet due
are exempt. Any unpaid accounts
at the close of business on the last
day of classes will be 'reported to
the Cashier of the University and
"(a) All academic credits wil
be withheld, the grades for the
semester or summer session just,
completed will not be released, and
no transcript of credits will be is-
sued.
"(b) All students owing such
accounts will not be allowed to
register in any subsequent semes-
ter or summer session until pay-
ment has been made." ,
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Hopwood Contests: All students
who have won prizes in the Hop-
wood contests this spring will 'be
notified before noon on May 31.
To All University Employees:
On Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays during the weeks of May
29 through June 9, special noon--r
time showings of the Michigan
Memorial-Phoenix Project slide
film, 12:30 to 1 p.m., 4051 Ad-"
ministration Buildings This is to
acquaint you with the facts be-,
hind your University's atomic re-
search center. There will be no
solicitation of funds. You are ,
urged to attend.
Commencement announcements
will be distributed in the lobby of
the Administration Building on L
Wed., May 31, and Thurs., June
1, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. for all
schools except Law, Medicine and k
Dentistry. This will be the last
opportunity seniors will have to
pick up their orders.
Mens' Glee Club Award Fund.
Applications will be accepted un-
til June 1 for financial aid awards
from the Men's Glee Club Award
Fund. All male students on cam-
pus are eligible for this award. It
is based upon need and participa-
tion in any extra-curricular activi-
ties. Interested persons must sub-
mit a letter before June.1 to W. B.
Rea, 1020 Administration Building,
giving their qualifications and"
needs.
Employment Interviews:
A representative of Snap-Out-
Forms Company (Detroit office) '
will be at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments on Mon., May 29 to inter-
view men for their sales training
program. They prefer business ad-
ministration students who have
had at least one year of account-
ing. The company sells supplies,
forms and records to business in-
dustrial firms. The position does
not involve any travel.
A representative of the Pitts-

burgh Plate Glass Company (De-
troit office) will be at the Bureau
of Appointments on Thurs., June
1 to interview men for their sales
training program.
For further information and to
make appointments for interview, '
(Continued on Page ')
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