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May 28, 1950 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MAY 28, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

...

SWING YOUR PARTNER:

4

Pledges' Profiles Projected

Folk, Square Dancing Club Will Hold Party
At Last Meeting Wednesday in Barbour Gym

"Step right bacI and watch her
smile, then step right up and
swing her awhile."
This is just one of the calls
that will keep couples busy at the
Folk and Square Dancing Club's'
final meeting Wednesday.

"COME AND BRING a guest,"
said Dick Kurland, president of
the club, to the group last Wed-
nesday; "Ice-cream, cokes and
cookies will be here for all !"
Wayne Coon, caller for the

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group, is bringing over some of
the new records he recently pur-
chased in the East and promises
to really "show them a good
time."
Although the Folk and Square
Dance Club only got started last
semester, they have grown stead-
ily in popularity. Each week, ap-
proximately 60 men and women
come over to Barbour Gym be-
tween 7:30 and 10 p.m. for a dance
or two.
* * *
THERE IS A small charge for
admittance which has enabled the
group to increase their supply of
records. Even more will be bought
before next fall.
At the meeting Wednesday,
the club hopes to hear from
several guest callers from the
administration, the Men's Phys-
ical Education Department and
students. The regular caller said
that he would like to get some
dancing in himself.
Mrs. Val Moat is the club ad-
visor assisted by Barbara Moly-
neaux, WAA Co-recreation man-
ager. Assisting Kurland, presi-
dent of the club, are Vance Burns,
Elaine Rothman and Ray Crapo.
DURING orientation week next
semester the club is taking over
Tuesday night to give a Folk and
Square Dancing party, especially
for the new transfer students.
If the weather permits, the
dancing may take place on the
parking lot between the Natur-
al Science and Chemistry Build-
ings. Otherwise it will be held
in the League Ballroom.
Another Folk and Square danc-
ing program will be held on Sat-
urday of Orientation week on the
Palmer Field tennis courts. Co-
recreational sports will be going
on all over the field for half the
new students. The other half will
populate the courts to dance.
* * *
THERE WILL be so many there
that orientation planners have
figured approximately six squares
per court. The club members will
assist with instruction that day
and calling.
With the great return to the old
dances, it looks like social danc-
ing may be taking a back seat for
awhile.
Read Daily Classifieds

-Daily-Alan Reid
PLEDGES' PROFILES-SAE actives Dave Williams and Stan
Steinkamp are shown sketching caricatures of the fraternity's
pledges which were then reflected behind the bandstand at the
chapter's annual "Black and White Ball." This year the tradi-
tional dance' was combined with the house's pledge formal.
*. * * *
Anua'Bac anf Whte.f ll
Champagne Bubbles, Gigantic Airplanes,
Silhouetted Profiles Provide Atmosphere

Tradition Has
Important Role
In College Life
Passers By Witness
Initiations, Stunts,
Parades on Diagonal
By JANICE JAMES
In spite of the claim that Uni-
versity students seem to be par-
ticipating in a factory of mass
education,. fair Ann Arbor sees its
share of traditions each day.
Within the past few weeks, the
Diag, main stem of University
life, has witnessed such startling
spectacles as human trees, a re-
turn of the redskins and even an
evening parade- of oil covered hu-
man forms.
* * *
WHEN MICHAGAMUA held its
initiation last week, the campus
resembled a return to the happy
hunting grounds of yore. Red-
skims abounded, and professors
were forced to start lectures later
than usual because of the aggre-
gate of latecomers to class.
For that matter, the Diag
seems to have become tradition-
al itself for the staging of in-
itiations and publicity stunts.
With stiltwalkers from Frosh
Week-End, canoes from Spph Cab
and even an orchestra complete
with dancing couples - for last
year's Tennis Ball, this crossroad
of campus life has provided in-
numerable bits of diversion for
book-toting students on their way
to classes.
AT ONE END of the Diag may
be found the pride and joy of tne
"slide rule brigade"; the "Engine
Arch!" Tradition says that no
woman is a true coed until she
has been kissed under the arch
by an engineer!
Then too, there's the long
standing rivalry between the
various houses on campus. When
the men of ATO begin plans
each year for their annual
Blackfoot Ball, the members of
Sigma Nu are always among
the first to hear of it-not in a
sane and silent manner, how-
ever.
Sigma Nu's receive the good
news via the monstrous black
feet found adorning the territory
around their house.
ANOTHER long standing rival
of ATO is Sigma Phi Epsilon.
Each year the two houses vie with
each other in a tug of war over
the Huron. Of late, this event
has been climaxed with a thor-
ough dunking for the ATO men.
Competition runs wild when
th Phi Ils aid SAE's meet
every year in their well known
Mud Bowl Game. Intermission
diversion is provided by the
members of Kappa Alpha Theta
and Collegiate Sorosis with their
version of the gridiron sport.
Speaking of females and foot-
balls, the Pi Phi-Tri Delt annual
Powder Puff Game should not be
overlooked.
Tradition certainly doesn't top-
ple on this campus - rather it
grows with leaps and bounds each
year.

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by HERB3 FARJ

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Champagne bubbles bounced
and caricatures cavorted at Sigma
Alpha Epsilon's annual "Black and
White Ball" presented last night
by the chapter's members in the
Ballroom at Willow Run.
Couples garbed in black and
white, the traditional colors of
the ball, danced to a musical at-
mosphere provided by Ted Smith
and his orchestra amidst decora-
tions which also carried out the
theme of the dance.
* * *
THROUGH the large window
located at the end of the ballroom,
dancers watched the arrival of
many of the gigantic planes which
populate the airport.
Located at the other end of
the room was a large cellophane
champagne glass behind which
a machine provided a steady
stream of realistic bubbles. Sil-
houetted caricatures of the pled-

ges were reflected behind the
bandstand.
Intermission entertainment was
provided by the SAE quartet which
presented a variety of barbershop
melodies.
* * A-
"BLACK AND White Ball" has
been a tradition with the SAE's so
long that the brothers themselves
are not quite sure as to its actual
origin.
It is thought to have been
first presented at the University
of Alabama, the home of the
fraternity's founding chapter.
In recent years it has grown to
become a national tradition
among SAE's throughout the
country.
First local presentation of the
dance was held at the Washtenaw
Country Club in 1947 with Buddy
Rich providing the musical back-
ground.
* * *
THIS YEAR the "Black and
white Ball" was combined with
the chapter's pledge formal. Din-
ner at the- fraternity house pro-
vided a prelude to the festivities.
Special invitations were issued'
to the presidents of both the East
and West Quadrangles and var-
ious fraternities on campus. Each
member also invited one guest
couple.
Chairman of the dance was
'John Madden. Dave Williams and
Al Lobley were in charge of decor-
ations.

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