100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 19, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- r- ., - . 9mrmmm9

PAGr MIM

_TIf M-M I A1S _trXiiiv

._.._.. . * ~
- U1NDA1Y, rEBUARY 19, 19541

______________________________________________________________________________ __________________________ ____________________U'________________________________________________________

,--

WORKING GOVERNMENT:
SL Official Spokesm an for' ''Students

Elected semiannually in an all-
campus election, the Student Leg-
islature provides University stu-
dents with an active, working stu-
dent government.
Its more than 50 members, rep-
resenting students from all cam-
pus housing groups, clubs and
associations, act as the official
spokesmen for the student body
in all problems arising with the
University administration and
faculty.
* * *
SL ITSELF is headed by a
seven-member Cabinet elected by
the Legislators each semester. The
Cabinet supervises the adminis-
tration of SL projects and out-
ines general policies for the year.
Working beneath the Cabinet
are six standing committees-
campus action, citizenship, cul-
ture and education, NSA, public
relations and varsity. Every
Legislator is a member of one
of these committees and it is
through them that most projects
are initiated and carried to
completion.
The varsity committee, for ex-
ample, sponsors the annual Home-
coming dance, Varsity Night, pep
rallies and team "send-offs" for
away games.
STRIVING TO promote better
international understanding
among University students, the
NSA committee sponsors educa-
tional drives on campus and has
set up a travel bureau in Lane
Hall where students may obtain
information on NSA's "travel-
study abroad" programs.
Other SL inspired projects in-
clude the nationally famous Phoe-
nix Project, the Better Business
Bureau, the Student Experts pro-
gram and the frosh-soph tug-of-
war.
Any student may run for an SL
seat upon submitting a 150-signa-
ture petition.
THE
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733

-Daily-Wally Barth -
BIG NIGHT FOR SL-Student Legislature officials Hugh Green-
berg, Herb Weingarten and Bill Clark (left to right) hectically
check over final returns on the night ofeall-campus elections
in November in which more than 7,000 students voted.
Speaking Experience Offered
By%, Sigma Rho" Tan Society

Daily Plays
Vital Part in
Student Life
Offiees Housed in
Extensive Plant
Bringing campus information
and world news to more than 20,-
000 readers, The Michigan Daily
plays an integral part in the life of
nearly every University student.
The Daily offices, located in the
Student Publications building, 420
Maynard St., are more complete
than those of any other college
newspaper in the country. They
include offices for the senior staff,
the business, women's sports staffs
and a large city room complete
with a large circular night desk
and an Associated Press teletype
wire.
THE GROUND floor houses an
extensive typesetting and compos-
ing room equipped with four lino-
type machines, a lead casting
unit and a modern photo-engrav-
ing machine.
In addition, the Daily has its
own press room which will soon
be refurnished with a new $60,-
000 rotary press capable of
turning out 17,000 papers an
hour.
Any eligible student may join
the Daily try-out staff as the first
step in working up to key posi-
tions on the junior and senior
staffs. A new try-out class com-
posed of more than 50 students is
organized every semester.
* * *
TRY-OUTS may individually
choose to work on the editorial
or the more specialized women's
or sports staffs. The Daily busi-
ness staff has its own organiza-
tion which is described in another
article.
Daily try-outs work one night
a week reading proofs and writ-
ing headlines and are given a
special training session one day
a week by a senior editor.
At the end of the semester they
are promoted to the sophomore.
staff and given regular "beats" to
cover daily. While on the "new
soph" staff, students learn to pol-
ish their writing style and are giv-
en special instruction by senior
editors.
* * *
DURING HIS third semester on
The Daily a student is made a
member of the "old soph" staff
and receives specializedrtraining
in page makeup and rewrite work.
At the end of this period of ap-
prenticeship each "old sopher"
works as a "Tryout Assistant Night
Editor" in preparation for ad-
vancement to the junior staff.
The junior staff is composed
of seven night editors and seven
assistant night editors who are
responsible for making up the
pages of The Daily one night
each week. In addition, junior
staff members are given the
larger "beats" for news cover-
age.
At the end of a year's work on
the junior staff students are elig-
ible to petition for positions on
the senior staff which is com-
posed of the managing editor, the
city editor, an editorial director
and four associate editors.
Senior staff members are res-
ponsible for training programs
and supervise the work of all of
the staffs.

Experience
In Advertising,
Given by Daily
Business Staff
Handles Finance
By simulating the operations of
a large business firm the Business
Staff of The Daily offers excellent
training in advertising, circula-
tion and finance.
Advertising staff members col-
lect, write, make-up, and promote
advertising, while the circulation
workers assume the responsibility
of distributing the paper to over
20,000 readers. The Finance Staff
handles all bookkeeping and bill-
ing.
* * *
SUPERVISION of the entire
entire staff is the job of the busi-
ness manager, who also acts as
liason officer between the busi-
ness and editorial staffs.
The advertising manager ov-
ersees all advertising and the fi-
nance manager directs the work
of the finance department. The
training of all understaffmen in
their duties as account servicers
is left to the associate business
manager.
Second semester freshmen with
a "C" average are eligible to try
out for the Business Staff. No
related experience is necessary,
but interested students should ex-
pect to devote at least three hours
a week to this activity.
Further information concerning
The Daily Business Staff may be
obtained by contacting Doera Nel-
son, Associate Business Manager,
at the Student Publications Bldg.

; ;

-Daily-Wally Barth
PHOENIX PROJECT COMMITTEE-Members of the student executive council of the Michigan-
Memorial Phoenix Project lay plans for next fall's vast student fund-raising campaign for the Uni-
versity's "living" war memorial. Committee members include, (seated, left to right) LaVerne Sch-
mitkons, Jean Lange, Marv Lubeck, chairman, Ina Sussman, Lois Eiselle, Betty Bridges and Marg
Kennedy. Standing, Bill Bristor, Don Boerma, Jim Brown, Stan Weinberger, George Roumell and
John Waidley. Not pictured, Dick Johnson.
*o*c ** *s * *i *
Council PansStfudent Poenix Drive

11,

Sigma Rho Tau was founded to
give engineers, architects and
technologists an opportunity to'
improve their speaking abilities.
Members meet to speak or con-
verse with each other in small
congenial groups. They welcome
the type of training this offers, be-
cause of a belief that a man's
success depends partially on his
ability to "sell" himself through
good speaking.
* * *
A BROAD AIM of the members
is to "insure a bond of understand-
ing" between their particular ap-l

plied sciences and the general pub-
lic.
Sigma Rho Tau members devote
at least three hours a week to
their activity.
Meeting Tuesday evenings in
Rm. 2084 East Engineering Bldg.,
they divide up into groups of
about 10, in which relaxation
and better speaking come easily.
All interested engineers, archi-
tects and students of tecnnology
are eligible to join. Carl Hanson,
215 Lloyd House, West Quad, may
be reached for extra information.

A

"Giving birth to a new enlight-
enment, a conversion of ashes into
life and beauty."
With these words from the Uni-
versity War Memorial Commit-
tee's resolution to the Board of
Regents the Michigan-Memorial
Phoenix Project was launched on
May 17, 1948.
* * *
DESIGNED to be a "living" me-
morial to the University's sons
who lost their lives in World War
I, the Phoenix Project will be
devoted to research in the peace-
time applications and implica-
tions of atomic energy.
It will provide the University
with a research center where
physical and social scientists
from all over the world will at-
tempt to find methods of teach-
ing and organizing our society to
adapt itself to the atomic era.
Since its conception by members
TEnsian Staff
Makes Photo
History of T'
Hitting the campus every spring,
the 'Ensian provides students with
a pictorial summary of campus
organizations and activities.
Over six thousand of the year-
books are sold annually, which is
the greatest salesvolume inany
Big Ten school.
KNOWN FORMALLY as the
Michiganensian, the book contains
pictures and stories about scores
of organizations, photos of grad-
uating seniors, and a review of
academic,,sports and social events
of the past year.
The staff is divided into two
main groups - editorial and
business. Each provides fun and
experience for its members, who
must spend the entire year pre-
paring the 'Ensian for publica-
tion.
Special departments of the
staffs include photography, art,
selling, advertising, accounting,
sports, features, copy, schools and
colleges, house groups, contracts,
and publicity.

of the Student Legislature in 1946
the project has emerged from the
embryo stage And a vast national
organization has been set up to
conduct the $6,500,000 fund-rais"-
ing campaign.
STUDENT participation in this
drive will be under the direction
of the recently appointed student
executive council headed by Mar-
vin Luebeck, '51.

. H 'heard about our
NE W
BOOKS
ARRIVING DAILY
CHECK US FOR YOUR NEEDS
z STUDENT SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS
IVAIHUS UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
316 South State Street

V

The 13 members of the council
are now forming their committees
and dozens of students are needed
on these committees to do the
planning and administrating for
the fund drive which will make the
Phoenix Project possible.
Although no goal has as yet been,
set, it will be the largest and most
far-reaching drive ever conducted
on campus, according.to Luebeck.

AS
'-I
A\
HART
SCHAFFNER
& MARX

"I

-m

'p
{04'
Y JO u

N

0 . *
kl f 5 WIAAAJ
) AA44 I
u

'S _
, w
Y M1 .
: ; .
w i ac^ 3 jjj J, c>

You saw
it in
Mvademnoiselle

'4

I

Bewitchery 'neath your favorite suit or with
your skirts . . . a promise with The dlouses
from our spring themed collection of Demure
Lacey nylons to the neatest classics you
could ask-for'
*PURESILKS *SHEERS
*RAYONS *NYLONS
*FINE COMBED COTTONS

4
/,

,,.. 1 n, w
4.
: t~
ti t
::
'.';; ;..{ti 4 ' .4
" ,
:y; ,":
,y .{.
fit : ^k (h'i'
.
:::x
; < ::
:{.
:
f ,t. .
. J

7
4

rrf
7
l!
!% %
i
%/ 4i
I
/i , %
S /
y
r° N
,,,
'
i ' j
i'

MEN'S
100% WOOL
FLANNEL DRESS
PANTS
$ f19

f

M

.

Blythe Spring Hats-

. an enchanting lace
collar to frame your
face. . . a Pretty-Lady
yoke to grace your new
spring suit. Rayon tissue
faille with dyed-to-

(Regular $9.95 value),
ALTERATIONS FREE

F

! )'
a V u
° (
\.

A gay collection of Sonnets
Helmets-flower trims in Failles--
Felts and Straws from 2.00 to 12.95.

match
White,
flower

heirloom face.
champagne, corn
blue, navy.

I L

A

®' k ___A9 __

i
iwr .tea ... ..

-----~

I

L, 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan